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KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Robert T. Stafford writes to Dr. King acknowledging receipt of a recent request to support a particular bill. Stafford asserts that he will respect the majority rule of the District of Columbia and possibly revisit the petition at a later date.

Plea for the Poor to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Signing as "A Poor Person," this author urges Dr. King to remember that poverty transcends race. The author requests that Dr. King help the poor of all races, with an emphasis on promoting voter registration for all poor people.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Progress"

Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints pertaining to "Progress" while making reference to a Herbert Spencer.

Banner at "Poor People's March," Washington, D.C. June, 1968

Washington, D.C.

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Note from Dora McDonald to MLK

Tuesday, August 21, 1962
Florida (FL)

In this notice, Dora McDonald informed Dr. King that Rev. Jackson visited the office and that he has a engagement for January 1, 1963.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Tisdale

Thursday, April 5, 1962
California (CA), Alabama (AL)

Miss McDonald informs Miss Tisdale that the information she requested may be found in Dr. King's book, Stride Toward Freedom, or Dr. Lawrence Reddick's book, Crusader Without Violence.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Letter from Joseph M. Hendricks to MLK

Monday, September 10, 1962
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joseph M. Hendricks writes Dr. King requesting a copy of the speech Dr. King gave at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Letter from C. Ray Ballard to MLK Regarding Adam Clayton Powell

Thursday, January 5, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

In this letter, Mr. Ballard expresses disappointment to hear a recent radio report of Dr. King's political support for Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Ballard defines this as a missed opportunity to promote racial justice.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Letter from Ludwig Meyer to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY)

Ludwig Meyer, Chairman of the Frankford Friends Meeting's Forum Committee, invites Dr. King to speak at his organization. Meyer states that if the date of the event is not convenient, he would like Coretta Scott King to be present.

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Boston, MA

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

MLK Addresses Riots and War

Sunday, October 1, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King encourages friends to support nonviolence in order to avoid physical or moral destruction. He explains that the, "SCLC cannot support riots for moral and pragmatic reasons."

Dr. King's Involvement with the Second Emancipation Proclamation

Saturday, March 24, 1962
CANADA

This article states, Dr. King recently announced President Kennedy has request he submit for his signature a second Emancipation Proclamation.

MLK Press Conference Regarding Telegram to President Johnson

Monday, July 24, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Detroit, MI, VIETNAM

Dr. King discusses the social destruction of riots, the high rates of unemployment, and the importance of nonviolence.

Letter from John R. Brescia to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

John R. Brescia requests to be sent campaign materials and a schedule of Dr. King's speaking engagements.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Iowa (IA)

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, February 11, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Benjamin E. Mays invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Founder's Day Banquet at Morehouse College.

Student Permanent Record of Judith Ann Jones

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
California (CA)

The student permanent record of Judith Ann Jones lists her academic progress while attending Chowchilla Union High School in Fresno, California in 1965.

Letter from Kivie Kaplan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Missouri (MO), New York, NY

Kivie Kaplan discusses with Dora McDonald the order of 200 books with autographed signatures from Dr. King. Mr. Kaplan has appointed direction of the order to Miss Roberta Halpern of the Publication Division of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.

S.C.L.C's Rev. Bevel Charges U.S. Gov't With Genocide

VIETNAM

This article, details the work and beliefs of Reverend James L. Bevel, a Baptist minister and field representative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Bevel claims that the United States Government is committing genocide against Negro people.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Wednesday, September 23, 1959
Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Delaware (DE), Maryland (MD), Missouri (MO), Kentucky (KY), Oklahoma (OK), West Virginia (WV), North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Philadelphia, PA, CANADA, EGYPT, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Telegram from Robert J. Brown to MLK

Robert J. Brown writes Dr. King with prayerful wishes, encouraging strength in his fight for civil rights.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

Atlantic City, NJ, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968
London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.

Letter from Carey B. Preston to MLK

Friday, August 28, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL

Carey Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, thanks Dr. King for being the public meeting speaker at their convention.

Letter from Martin Segal to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Martin Segal, the Dinner Chairman of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King asking him to attend the NUL's Equal Opportunity Dinner and accept membership on the dinner's honorary committee. Writing by Dorothy Cotton, Dr. King's assistant, appears at the top right, stating this was the same day that Dr. King would be attending President Johnson's White House Conference in Washington, D.C.

Bible 252

ISRAEL

This exam from a course entitled "Bible 252" lists forty-eight questions regarding Biblical knowledge.