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Letter from Dora McDonald to David Mays

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora E. McDonald responds to David Mays of Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee. As requested, she encloses a copy of a speech Dr. King gave in Washington. Ms. McDonald also informs that a recording of the speech is available for purchase from the Council for United Civil Rights Leadership.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert Kennedy of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest and expresses his concern for Shuttleworth's safety due to recent threatening activities directed toward nonviolent leaders.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. Jesse Jackson

Dr. King writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson, urgently requesting his presence at a meeting of the Action Committee for Washington.

Edwin B. Allaire's Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Mr. Allaire informs Dr. King that there are many individuals who would vigorously support him in becoming a presidential candidate.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Wiley Bell

Thursday, July 25, 1963

In this letter, Dr. King writes a thank you note to Mr. Bell for his support concerning "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King that he has filed a case in Mississippi "requesting the court to require law enforcement officials to protect civil rights workers and other citizens."

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Invitation to MLK from Randolph Carter

Wednesday, February 3, 1064

Randolph Carter invites Dr. King to be the featured leader in a Conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Telly H. Miller to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

Telly H. Miller, a graduate of the Morehouse School of Religion of the Interdenominational Theological Center and pastor in a West Virginia church, invites Dr. King to their Centennial. Pastor Miller requests that Dr. King deliver the Centennial sermon and explains that his coming will be a "great help" to the community.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

Letter from Juan Mari Bras to MLK

Sunday, February 19, 1967

Juan Mari Bras, Secretary-General of the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, writes Dr. King about Puerto Rican opposition to the Vietnam War. Bras informs Dr. King that his group will be at the April 15th Mobilization Committee Against the War in Vietnam rally outside of the United Nations. Bras hopes to communicate with Dr. King face to face and exchange ideas.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

This telegram forwarded by Rodney Clurman to Dr. King sends word regarding the need for transportation, food, medical supplies and water. Clurman also makes mention of a smallpox epidemic, stating that fifty million may die from the disease. He closes by encouraging the Reverend to wire him if interested in accompanying him to Scotland.

Letter from Rev. William M. Brooks to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

William Brooks, Executive Director of the Gary Neighborhood House, requests Dr. King's permission for his staff to visit the SCLC Chicago office to observe their work being done in the slum areas.

Letter from Mary Ann Quilter to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Ms. Quilter informs Dr. King of a political event taking place on campus and asks him for any campaign literature he can provide and a picture of himself.

Preliminary Outline for a Conference on Democratic Planning For America

This preliminary outline features a number of keynote dignitaries and leaders who will address a number of economic, labor, and social justice issues during the three-day Conference on Democratic Planning for America.

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Friday, April 30, 1965

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

Letter from MLK to J. Martin England

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

Dr. King express his appreciation for Mr. J. Martin England's support.

Letter from Frances Witherspoon to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967

Frances Witherspoon offers his or her thanks and praise to Dr. King's new book and efforts in promoting racial unity.

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King, thanking him for his financial pledge to the college and asking him to join the Morehouse men who have either paid out their pledges or whose pledges are up to date. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Letter from E. Z. Graves to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

E. Z. Graves adversely compares Dr. King, Stokely Carmicheal and Adam Clayton Powell to manure. Mr. Graves attaches an article entitled, "King and Carmicheal Maps Strategy for Summer Attacks on Big Cities."

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1968

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Letter from Alice B. Bye to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Alice B. Bye requests that Dr. King send information and a picture for her school report.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding voter registration.