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The American Dream

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Birthday Card from Belle and Cleveland to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Belle and Cleveland entitled, "North, South, East or West."

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King quotes Bernard of Clairvaux on the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Milton Rokeach

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Rokeach concerning the involvement of social scientists and the civil rights movement. Dr. King encourages Dr. Rokeach to become actively involved with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

Letter from Henry J. Dillon to MLK

Saturday, August 20, 1966

Henry Dillon, Vice President of Lithographers and Photoengravers International Union, writes Dr. King. He states, "as long as you choose to support the discredited program and philosophy of this Local...I cannot support- or ask my members to support your organization."

Letter from MLK to Reverend W.E. Gardner

Wednesday, February 28, 1962

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of the First Baptist Church in Long Island, New York.

Letter from Harry J. Cargas to MLK Regarding The Queen's Work

Tuesday, November 19, 1963

The editor of "The Queen's Work," a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society, sends Dr. King a copy of the December issue. The editor informs Dr. King that the magazine goes out to twenty thousand Catholic high school students around the nation, and this issue's focus on interracial justice should interest Dr. King.

Sen. Edward Brooke Press Release

Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts travels to Africa to discuss world affairs and the needs of the country with African leaders. Also, his itinerary for the trip is present.

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

Letter from Mrs. Bonnie Cohen to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Bonnie Cohen, a senior at Eastern Michigan University, writes to Rev. Abernathy requesting his thoughts on the problem of "crime in the streets."

Letter to Augustus F. Hawkins from MLK

Wednesday, March 16, 1966

Dr. King informs Augustus F. Hawkins that he agrees with his assertion that there are malice actions within poverty programs and the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Dr. King states that he "wholeheartedly" endorses the proposal to withhold federal funds from communities that are not allowing proper representation of the poor within their Community Action Programs. Dr. King also informs Mr. Hawkins that the SCLC is continuing to prepare for the Chicago Campaign.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Letter of Gratitude from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

In this letter, Maurice A. Dawkings, the Assistant Director for Civil Rights, expresses gratitude for the work Dr. King does.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

Letter of Support to MLK

Saturday, November 12, 1966

In this letter, a supporter of Dr. King writes to let him know of how good of a job that they feel he his doing.

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

A Tribute to the Organized Labor Movement

Tuesday, March 1, 1960

The Jewish Labor Committee extends heartfelt gratitude to the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) for twenty-five years of fraternal cooperation.

Let's Be Human

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Toward Responsible Freedom

This manuscript describes the state of the country democracy and the challenges resulting from rapid urbanization, social dislocation and complexities of technological existence. Community organization is the solution provided to establish a sense of self-reliance and local democracy.

Letter from Philip Isely to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Philip Isely, Secretary General for the World Constitutional Convention, asks Dr. King to publicly declare himself as an election candidate as delegate to the Peoples World Parliament and World Constitutional Convention. He states that Dr. King endorsed the idea in the past and encourages him to pursue the candidacy.

Letter from Finley Drewery to NAACP

Saturday, June 17, 1967

Finley Drewery writes to the NAACP seeking aid for his upcoming criminal trial. He asserts that the state has no hard evidence against him and that his court appointed attorney is trying to make him pay $3,000 to mount a defense in court.

Secrets of a Happy Marriage

Dr. King expounds upon the secrets of a happy marriage. His first point is that the husband and wife must comprehend the nature of sexes. He describes the dichotomy of a man and woman's perception of contentment. The second point Dr. King makes is that the married couple must have an understanding of the nature of marriage itself. He further asserts that a successful marriage must be built on a mutual compromise. The final contention by Dr. King is each individual must instill the sacredness of marriage.

Letter from Governor John Reynolds to MLK

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Governor Reynolds requests Dr. King to speak at a Conference on Civil Rights in celebration of the centennial year of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Sylvester Webb to MLK

Thursday, December 23, 1965

Sylvester Webb, Sponsor of the Sixth Grade Graduating Class Gift for Edward Gideon Public School in Philidelphia, informs Dr. King that an oil portrait of him was commissioned by sixth grade class. Webb request King's appearance or one of his advisers for the ceremony to place the portrait in the school lobby. Dr. King would later send Reverend Walter Fauntroy of the SCLC's Washington bureau to represent him.

Letter from Wayne Williams to Virgil D. Jones

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

In this letter, Wayne Williams, Director of Field Activities at Fair Employment Practices Commission in Illinois, informs Virgil Jones that they have investigated his charge with the Commission and now want to review the information over with him.

A Promising Day for the City of Selma

In this handwritten public statement, the author addresses the Negro citizens of Selma, Alabama by commending their efforts of non-violence during a one-thousand person demonstration for equal voting rights.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Mr. Brookshire explains to Dr. King the application of the U.S. Constitution to underprivileged groups and urges him to avoid matters of war and peace.