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"VENEZUELA"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry R. Luce

Friday, February 15, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dora McDonald writes to Henry Luce, of Time & Life, in response to his prior correspondence to Dr. King.

Letter from Oakleigh Ross Bush to MLK

Saturday, June 25, 1966
Texas (TX)

Oakleigh Ross Bush discusses the significance of author Joel Candler Harris with Dr. King. Bush also tells Dr. King about a book of Harris' work, which Bush edited. Bush currently is trying to get the book published, but needs a forward written by "an eminent American Negro" in order for publishers to accept the manuscript.

Letter from Congressman Ralph J. Rivers to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Alaska (AK), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Representative Rivers of Alaska informs Dr. King that he intends to sign the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Letter from Sue Jane Mitchell Smock to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Mrs. Smock writes to Dr. King a "note of appreciation" regarding the Nobel Peace Prize and her artwork. A 1964 issue of Time Magazine featured a photograph of Dr. King's living room which displayed a "woodcut print" of Mrs. Smock's work. She also invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a future exhibition in Atlanta.

National Citizens' Commission Report to Congress

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Urban Development Coordinator Shelby Southard, of the Cooperative League of the USA, sends Dr. King a copy of this report to Congress recommending improved foreign aid for urban development. Southard helped author the report, entitled the "National Citizens' Commission on Urban Development." It emphasizes unrest caused by "deplorable social conditions" in cities around the world, and seeks to improve urban development planning.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King alerts Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the brutal treatment against Negroes attempting register to vote in Greenville, Mississippi. He asks Kennedy to intervene in an effort to protect the lives of those individuals working for the right to vote.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 22, 1963
Indiana (IN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Neighborhood Spotlight on Greater Cleveland

Cleveland, OH

This document contains information regarding the Urban League Housing Program, which provides statistical information on the communities in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area.

Telegram from Charles William Butler to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965
Detroit, MI, Baltimore, MD

Charles William Butler, Pastor of New Cavalry Baptist Church, informs Dr. King that he will not be present at a board meeting. The lateness of the invitation and his involvement in Detroit, Michigan prevent his attendance.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Harvey Cox

Monday, August 2, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL)

Andrew Young requests a photograph and biographical sketch of Harvey Cox, a well known theologian. The materials will be used for publicity of a convention that Cox will be making an address.

The Desegregated Heart

Sunday, July 1, 1962

Dr. King praises Sarah-Patton Boyle for her creation of the book, "The Desegregated Heart." Dr. King recommends that everyone reads the book, for it expresses the power of Christian love operating in the human heart.

Letter from Congressman Adam Clatyon Powell to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Harlem Representative Adam Clayton Powell informs Dr. King that all of the "War on Poverty" hearings will be cancelled until furtherl notice.

Letter from Constance A. Price to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Colorado (CO), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Ms. Price writes to Dr. King to request that he makes mention of the blatant injustices committed by the State of Colorado, to its citizens, during the "poor people's campaign" in Washington, D.C.

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), New York (NY)

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

Letter from Edward Thacker to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Arkansas (AR), Hot Springs, AR, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Edward Thacker, former State Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars for Arkansas, expresses his disagreement with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War. Thacker also contends that the eradication of poverty is an unrealistic goal.

Letter from MLK to Paralee Fields

Friday, November 13, 1964
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King writes Paralee Fields to decline an invitation to speak at the commencement for Phenix High School. Dr. King explains that he is very busy with the Civil Rights Movement and has limited time for speaking engagements.

Letter to Mrs. King from Rev. and Mrs. Joseph L. Roberts

Thursday, April 11, 1968
Detroit, MI

In this heartfelt correspondence to Mrs. King, Rev. Joseph Roberts, President Elder of the West Detroit District for the AME Church, expressed sympathy for the death of Dr. King. In the letter, he acknowledges the enclosure of the hard copy of his spoken tribute to Dr. King. Seven years later, in 1975, Rev. Roberts would succeed Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr., as the fourth pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter From Walter R. McCall to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Morehouse School of Religion Director Walter McCall asks Dr. King for a contribution to purchase a piano that will be presented to Morehouse School of Religion.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Indiana (IN)

Dr. Kings thanks Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton for her and Mr. James Peterson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
San Francisco, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Letter from A. Morsbach to MLK

Tuesday, October 18, 1966
New York, NY, ISRAEL

A. Morsbach writes Dr. King regarding his tour to the Holy Land. Having years of experience with group travel, Morsbach informs Dr. King that he plans to check the background of Concreta Tours. He further suggests that King investigate Concreta Tours prior to concluding final travel arrangements.

Monothelitism

Dr. King outlines the principles of Monothelitism.

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Telegram from The United Ministries of Texas Southern University to MLK

Tuesday, May 19, 1964
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

The United Ministries of Texas Southern University thanks Dr. King for his visit to the school to speak on education and the "greater concern for human dignity and social rightness." They feel that Dr. King's appearance has made a significant impact on the school and the students.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. A. Dale Fiers

Friday, September 10, 1965
Indiana (IN), Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

Miss McDonald confirms that Dr. King will speak in Dallas at a meeting organized by the Assembly of Christian Churches. She also requests details about the speaking engagement and encloses a biographical sketch and photograph.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Helga Gulbrandsen responds to a previous letter from Dr. King and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Gulbrandsen expresses regret concerning the Reverend's unavailability for a lecture in the Oslo Group.