Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"VENEZUELA"

The SCLC Hall of Fame Dinner of July 1962

Friday, July 20, 1962

This pamphlet is from the Hall of Fame Dinner for Jackie Robinson. It features several ads from organizations supporting the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Harl Douglass to MLK and the SCLC

Wednesday, March 9, 1966

Harl Douglass writes in disgust at the position Dr. King has taken on Vietnam War. As a once full supporter of the civil rights movement, he believes that Dr. King "is somewhat unstable and he has made millions of enemies for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference....." Douglass warns Dr. King and SCLC officials that if they continue to go down the same track they will lose support of white moderates.

Letter from Linda Robinson to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Linda Robinson, a sixth grade student at Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing her admiration towards him for his work with the Civil Rights Movement.

Secular

Dr. King identifies the origin of the term secular as "meaning 'century,' that in time as distinguished from eternity." He explains that eternal things were more important that the things deemed to be belonging only to the present.

Revised Grant Award Letter from Otis Roberts

Otis Roberts lists changes to a grant awarded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Letter from Charles H. Walter to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 29, 1962

Charles Walters notifies Dora McDonald that he is sending a copy of the current edition of Labor Today. Walters requests an 1100 word article and photo from Dr. King for the forthcoming issue.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Friday, May 10, 1963

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

Letter from Menno Klassen to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Menno Klassen offers support on behalf of the Peace Committee of the Mennonite Central Committee for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Klassen explains that Dr. King is facing the same opposition that Jesus Christ did because he is continuing Jesus' work.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

Letter from MLK to Ralph McGill

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Dr. King writes to Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution to clarify his position on the Vietnam War. Dr. King considers his objection to the war to be a matter of conscience, and not one of political expediency.

Letter from Gene Riley to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966

Gene Riley writes Coretta Scott King requesting that she contribute to a spring planting project.

Letter from MLK to Norman Baugher

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King conveys his support to Norman Baugher for the Church of the Brethren's past correspondence regarding publicizing the philosophy of nonviolence.

Letter From Jimmy Williams to MLK

Sunday, February 25, 1968

Jimmy Williams, a U.S. Air Force officer, writes Dr. King requesting assistance in protesting his unjust termination from Officers Training School.

Letter to MLK from G. Houghton

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Mr. Houghton writes to Dr. King with a plan for SABON (Saving and Building Organization of, by, and for the Negroes).

Telegram from MLK to Rev. N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Dr. King sends his condolence to Rev. Burtenshaw of the Catholic Archdioceses of Atlanta for the death of Archbishop Hallinan.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Event Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This program outlines the events for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C.

February 1968, Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, writes to announce the endorsment of Reverend S. M. Sam Davis at their candidate for bishop.

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, annouces Reverend S. M. Sam Davis as their candidate for bishop. As a member of the Davis Boosters' Club, she attempts to solicit support for Reverend Davis. The Boosters' Club will feature Mrs. Lucinda Brown Pobey and Mrs. Willie Mae bell in a special financial event.

Letter from MLK to Birch Bayh

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Birch Bayh's support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition, Dr. King prays for Mr. Bayh's recovery from his recent accident.

What is the OIC Institute?

This brochure for the Opportunities Industrialization Center describes what it provides for students with the characteristics and training needed to develop an accelerated professional caliber for employment.

SCLC Executive Staff Meeting

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Dr. King provides Civil Rights Activist, Septima Clark, with information regarding the Executive Staff meeting for the SCLC. Dr. King requests that Ms. Clark have her report ready to present prior to the meeting.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.

Letter from MLK to Bruce Smith

Tuesday, June 23, 1964

Dr. King responds to Mr. Smith's earlier letter, in which Smith objected to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. King recommends his book, "Why We Can't Wait" to Smith and offers his response to Smith's argument against the bill.

Letter from MLK to Senator Phillip A. Hart

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Phillip A. Hart expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

Letter from MLK to Robert L. Shirley

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King writes to Robert Shirley to inform him that, if necessary, he will send a member of the SCLC to serve in the interm for Golden Frinks who has been reassigned to another location.

State of New York Civil Rights Bureau - 1967 Annual Report

This is the overview of the advancements and achievements affiliated with the New York Civil Rights Bureau, in 1967.

Letter from Carolyn Martinelli to Ralph Abernathy After the Death of MLK

Saturday, April 13, 1968

Mrs. Martinelli writes Rev. Abernathy in the month following Dr. King's death, encouraging him to continue promoting a philosophy of love and equality. Martinelli identifies herself as a white housewife, teacher and mother of two, who has only known three Negroes in her whole life. . Although she has never known poverty, her desire is for all Americans to know the truth and work to resolve these problems in society.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."