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By-Laws of the SCLC

Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Maryland (MD), Mississippi (MS), Missouri (MO), North Carolina (NC), Oklahoma (OK), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA), West Virginia (WV)

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Sin

Dr. King summarizes and quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's view of sin in Christian Faith.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

MLK's Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Friday, October 24, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on his brutal attack by the "deranged woman" Izola Ware Curry, in which he was stabbed near the heart. He stresses the importance of remaining committed to nonviolence and says he is grateful for the outpouring of sympathy and affection he received while in the hospital.

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King requests that President Kennedy give full consideration to judges William Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.

Letter from Joseph F. McCrindle to SCLC

Wednesday, December 28, 1966
New York, NY

Joseph F. McCrindle, President of the Henfield Foundation, encloses a check of $250.00 to SCLC on behalf of the Henfield Foundation.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

The Martin Luther King Column

GERMANY

Dr. King addresses his concerns about the rise of anti-Semitism in Germany.

Letter from Joan Daves to Y. Katahira

Friday, June 26, 1964
New York (NY), JAPAN

Joan Daves writes Mr. Katahira asking for an update on an offer by Shinkyo Shuppan Sha for Dr. King's book "Strength To Love." She also asks Katahira to inform Tetsuo Kohmoto that Dr. King's current responsibilities and engagements are restricting him from writing the preface.

Mbutta Milando Resume

This is the resume of Mbutta Milando, an Eisenhower Exchange Fellow from Tanzania.

Thank you Letter from MLK

Friday, January 26, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Thank you Letter from MLK to Dr. Jones at Morehouse College for an autographed copy of "A Candle In The Dark"

Death of a King

Mrs. D. M. Murray wrote this poem, entitled "Death of a King," following Dr. King's assassination. Murray writes "you've set an example for us here, your very presence brought us cheer" and adds a post script asking the recipient to contact her.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Letter from Mrs. F.B. Farquharson to Dr. Martin Luther King about an SCLC Memo

Friday, August 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. F.B. Farquharson expresses her gratitude after reading a letter and memo that was sent from Dr. King and the SCLC staff that deeply moved her in a manner in which she feels compelled to share the contents of both with a few of her comrades.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Wednesday, June 15, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

Letter from Hans-Luder Temmen to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Atlanta, GA, GERMANY

This document contains a request for Dr. King's autograph from Mr. Temmen in Germany.

Letter from Howard R. Neville to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

Michigan State provost, Howard Neville, tells Dr. King that Dr. Robert Green is available for a one year leave of absence for the Neighborhood Leader Training Program.

Letter from Constance A. Price to Peter H. Dominick

Tuesday, October 3, 1967
Denver, CO, Colorado (CO), Washington, D.C.

Constance Price addresses grievances and complaints related to human rights. She demands appropriate and necessary congressional actions.

Communism

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Engles as he clarifies that Karl "Marx was not an economic determinist as many have thought." The economic situation and superstructure of society are noted as key elements.

Secular

Dr. King identifies the origin of the term secular as "meaning 'century,' that in time as distinguished from eternity." He explains that eternal things were more important that the things deemed to be belonging only to the present.

Letter to Senator Robert Kennedy from MLK

Wednesday, March 2, 1966
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

Dr. King applauds Senator Robert Kennedy for his statement on Vietnam. Both Robert Kennedy and former President John F.Kennedy contributed to the overall political philosophy and concept of a world of diversity. In addition, Dr. King mentions several political entities of progression due to the intellect and partnership with Senator Kennedy.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, February 19, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Tuskegee, AL, Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

SCLC Press Release: 1967 Election Results

Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This SCLC release hails the election of America's first two black mayors, Carl Stokes in Cleveland, Ohio and Richard Hatcher in Gary, Indiana. The release stresses that such men "cannot do the job alone" and condemns efforts in Congress to cut the War on Poverty even as billions are spent on the Vietnam War.

Anonymous letter to MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965
Lowndes County, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Telegram from President John F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, June 12, 1963
Washington, D.C.

President John F. Kennedy invites Dr. King to a meeting of religious leaders to discuss the nation's civil rights problem.

Letter from MLK to Reverend David A. Gibbons

Wednesday, June 19, 1963
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King writes this letter of appreciation to Reverend David A. Gibbons, Executive Secretary of the Denison Christian Association at Denison University. King is overjoyed to accept the $255 donation from several students and faculty members of the university. He explains the importance of the contribution and how it supports SCLC's voter registration work in Birmingham.