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"VENEZUELA"

Background of the Speakers

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Letter from D. Wesley Slate. Jr. to MLK

D. Wesley Slate Jr. informs Dr. King that the student body of the Southeastern Branch will be participating in CHOICE 68 by Time Magazine and request any campaign literature he could provide.

Letter from Charles H. Walter to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 29, 1962

Charles Walters notifies Dora McDonald that he is sending a copy of the current edition of Labor Today. Walters requests an 1100 word article and photo from Dr. King for the forthcoming issue.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lamb Toledo to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. Toledo offer support to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy, A.D. King, and Wyatt Walker.

MLK Statement Regarding the Non-Partisan Position of the SCLC

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

While keeping the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's position as a non-partisan organization, Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Senator Kennedy's concern for his arrest.

Letter from MLK to Agnes Mack

Saturday, December 10, 0196

Dr. King sends Agnes Mack a form to complete so that she may receive a copy of the "I have a Dream" speech.

Letter from MLK to Senator Thomas H. Kuchel Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas H. Kuchel's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a recent telegram concerning an investigation in the alleged assault upon Miss Shirley Gaines by an Albany police officer.

Letter from MLK to Franklin D. Roosevelt III about Contribution

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Roosevelt regarding a contribution he made to the SCLC.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

The Lynching Tree

Jerry Peace writes the poem "The Lynching Tree" which illustrates the pain involved with lynching black people.

Postcard from J. Mason

Mason requests that Dr. King focus more on black youth crime rates, orphan children and other charitable activities within the black community.

The Synagogue Council of America

This pamphlet provides information on the Synagogue Council of America, including its goals and financing methods. The Council was formed to unite the orthodox, conservative and reform Jewish movements into a single group.

Letter from Nancy Parr to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1968

In this letter, Nancy Parr offers help to Dr. King in trying to "avert riots in 1968" to prevent the "right-wing" from taking over the nation.

And There Was Love

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

Friday, September 29, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

Letter from Jonathan B. Bingham to MLK

Thursday, February 17, 1966

Congressman Bingham of New York replies to Dr. King's donation solicitation letter requesting a renewal of the previous year's fifty dollar contribution to SCLC. The congressman states that he would like to know whether contributions will be used to influence foreign policy before committing to a decision.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Norman Seldes

Thursday, August 20, 1964

In this carbon copy of a letter to Mrs. Norman Seldes, Dr. King sends his appreciation for response to a letter of recent date.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Catherine Aller took the time to write Dr. King and encourage him to keep pursuing his goals in spite of criticism.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

Letter from MLK to Society of Brothers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King thanks the Society of Brothers for its recent donation to the SCLC and explains why the donation is important to the work and needs of the SCLC.

Voter Education Project News

This newsletter of the Voter Education Project reports on the progress of voter registration efforts in six southern states and a regional officeholders seminar for Negro city and county elected officials.

Letter from Charles Daly to Dr. King

Sunday, April 10, 1966

Charles Daly is attaching an article from the 1966 issue of the University of Chicago Magazine that he thought would be of interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Wednesday, March 17, 1965

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

Letter from John H. Johnson to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

John H. Johnson, President and Editor at Johnson Publishing Company, informs Dr. King that a soldier has donated money to his organization and the NAACP.