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"VIETNAM"

Letter from Minerva Moreno to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Minerva Moreno, a New York City student, offers her sympathy to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

Letter from Lyman Cady to MLK

Wednesday, July 5, 1967

Lyman Cady, of Westminister Presbyterian Church, expresses his support for Dr. King's recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" He also commends Dr. King's overall leadership throughout the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK on Communist Infiltration

Dr. King responds to an article written by Joseph Alsop and J. Edgar Hoover that charged communism had infiltrated the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. Abernathy Appeals to New Governor of Alabama

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

Ralph David Abernathy, vice-president of the SCLC, issues a press release concerning the federal governments decision to halt funding to the state of Alabama for noncompliance with the 'law of the land'. Abernathy appeals this decision and asserts that the blame should be directed towards local government officials such as George C. Wallace.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

Letter from Mrs. Gossett to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Mrs. Gossett responds to Dr. King's "Showdown for Non-Violence," an article in Look magazine. She compares welfare and social security to subsidies received by the agricultural, railroad and mining industries. She also encloses an editorial from her local paper that mentions Dr. King.

Letter from Otto Emil Geppert to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Otto Emil Geppert expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and encloses a monetary contribution to Dr. King, in support of his nonviolent approach.

The Ben Bella Conversation

Dr. King summarizes his recent two-hour meeting with Premier Ahmed Ben Bella of the newly-formed Algerian Republic. He mentions that Ben Bella was intimately familiar with the details of the civil rights movement and repeatedly said or inferred that “we are brothers.” King states that “the battle of the Algerians against colonialism and the battle of the Negro against segregation is a common struggle.” There are international implications for the US if it doesn’t solve its human rights problem: the nation will become a second-rate power in the world.

Letter from MLK to Jesse W. Furlow

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Dr. King disagrees with Mr. Furlow's theory that "we are the victims of a Catholic conspiracy."

Letter of invitation from Rabbi Albert A. Goldman to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965

Goldman invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker for the Community Thanksgiving Service at The Isaac M. Wise temple in Ohio.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Letter from Philip H. Partridge to Hon. Stephen Young Regarding Evil Commentary

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

In this letter to Mr. Young, Mr. Partridge outlines a series of "attacks" that have been placed against him following his public speech based on political opinions.

Leaders' Itinerary for August 28 March

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This document contains a detailed leaders' itinerary for the March on Washington for Freedom and Jobs. Throughout the day leaders will meet with government officials, including, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John McCormack and President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from Thomas Price to MLK

Thursday, October 8, 1964

Major Thomas Price, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance in retaining his commission and active duty service with the United States Army.

Telegram from Robert J. Brown to MLK

Robert J. Brown writes Dr. King with prayerful wishes, encouraging strength in his fight for civil rights.

Ross Hamilton Sends MLK Support

Thursday, November 28, 1963

Ross Hamilton, 11-years-old, writes Dr. King with support and encloses money from one of his Christmas gifts.

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Moral Absolutism"

Dr. King drafted this handwritten outline entitled "Moral Absolutism." The focus is on judgement and its relation to both good and evil.

Statement on the Muhammed Ali World Heavyweight Title Controversy

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

An unknown author declares a boycott of all fight games until the Boxing Commission restores Muhammad Ali's World Heavyweight Title.

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Charles Chew, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966

Charles Chew Jr., of the Chicago City Council, has invited Dr. King to join him for a radio interview regarding the topic of "Crash Program on Slums."

Sin

Dr. King explains the relationship between punishment and sin by referencing the biblical verse, I Chronicles 21:17.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Lilace Reid Barnes

Monday, May 23, 1966

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the contribution made by Lilace Barnnes to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King states that without the contributions from supporters the initiatives of the SCLC would not be possible.

Newspaper Article Concerning Race Riot at Northwestern University

The author of this article gives an account of a race riot that occurred during a basketball game at Northwestern University.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

Examination for MLK Class

This document contains examination questions for Dr. King's class. Dr. King taught a class at Morehouse College briefly in the early 1960s.

Letter from Martin Gal to MLK

Thursday, August 8, 1963

Martin Gal, Producer in Public Affairs at WMSB TV, requests permission rights to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for broadcasting purposes. Gal seeks to create a short pictorial documentary with Dr. King reading the text as a voice-over.