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"VIETNAM"

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Christmas Gift List of Mrs. King

This list entails those in receipt of a Christmas gift from Coretta Scott King.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Wednesday, October 17, 1962

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

Letter from John Frankel to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

John Frankel expresses gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of Sargent Shriver for supporting the efforts of the Queens Clinical Society in South Jamaica.

Letter from MLK to C. I. C. Bosanquet

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Dr. Bosanquet for being awarded an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Dr. King deeply appreciated being considered for the degree and for the generous hospitality he received while at the university.

Letter from Dr. Helen Curth to the MLK Memorial Fund

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Dr. Curth encloses a donation for the Martin Luther King Memorial Fund. She requests that a receipt for $5 be sent to each of her two grandsons so that they may feel connected to Dr. King's memory.

Immortality

Dr. King discusses the relationship between the physical and spiritual elements of man. He notes four theories that describe the nature of soul and body.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 28, 1965

In this letter Ms. Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for sending her the commission check from the "Saturday Review" SELMA piece. Daves goes on to say that Dr. King's article on the Watts riots was not published in several publications due to "scheduling problems", but will run in the "Saturday Review".

Letter from MLK to William Ericson

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King states his appreciation for the contribution made by Mr. Ericson to the SCLC Foundation. Dr. King goes on to express how grateful he is to have such support in the promotion of social change through non-violence.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Evil

In this notecard Dr. King details the reason for suffering. He references notes from "City of God" by St. Augustine.

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

Philosopher (definition)

Dr. King quotes poet William Wordsworth's definition of a philosopher.

Letter from Bill Dady to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

In this letter, "Free Men and Free Markets," a book by Robert Theobald, is introduced to Dr. King by Bill Dady.

The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966

Dr. King makes a public statement addressing the poor economic and housing conditions in the North. Dr. King specifically identifies Chicago as the prototype for the conditions occurring within this region. He describes a three phase plan detailing how to properly address and manage the problems effectively.

North and South: SCLC Staff News January, 1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

The January, 1967 edition of SCLC's staff newsletter shares Christmas and New Year stories from the staff members and their families. The newsletter also reports on recent activities of the organization such as a Chicago boycott, Junius Griffin's move to the Republican National Committee, a political rally, the SCLC's housing project in Chicago, a recent conference on Negro history, the situation in Grenada, Mississippi and other news items.

MLK's Annual Report to SCLC Convention

Friday, October 2, 1964

As President of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers his Annual Report to the Eighth Annual Convention in Savannah, Georgia. In addition to listing SCLC's many accomplishments over the past year, Dr. King urges his audience to stay resolute as their great progress creates a growing racial backlash from those opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

Darien Integration

Friday, April 17, 1964

This article is a summary of the integration of the Negro population into high-income residential suburbs. The Superintendent of schools and the Darien Board of Education has created a program to exchange schoolteachers and encourage students to attend schools with integrated classes.

Clement of Alexandria

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on Clement of Alexandria.

Letter from M. Carl Holman to MLK Regarding Event Invitation

Tuesday, September 26, 1967

Mr. Holman informs Dr. King he will soon receive a formal invitation to attend the Commission's National Conference on Race and Education in Washington, D.C. Mr. Holman is sending this advance notice with the hope Dr. King can fit the conference into his schedule.

Statement by MLK Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

After being notified of receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King released this statement to the public.He refers to the award not as an honor but as a "tribute to the discipline."

Letter from Edwin Allaire to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

The writer, who identifies himself as a professor at the University of Michigan, encourages Dr. King to announce his candidacy for the Presidency.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from the International Convention of Christian Churches to MLK

Friday, October 7, 1966

The International Convention of Christian Churches communicates their appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the evening panel on "The Churches and the Struggle for Human Freedom, Dignity and Brotherhood." The executive secretary informs Dr. King of the enclosed honorarium for his contribution to this panel discussion.

Ontology

Dr. King poses the ontological question "What is being itself?" and quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

SCLC: Summary Of Ninth Annual Convention

This summary of the SCLC's Ninth Annual Convention describes events that were instrumental in the formation of the organization. The document outlines the ongoing projects of the organization and offers proposals for future efforts.