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"VIETNAM"

Dr. King's Notes on Ministry

Dr. King explains his perspective on the path of ministry as a career. In this brief paragraph, he notes that ministry is a very noble career but it is also difficult.

Letter from Berenice Wiggins to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Wiggins encloses a contribution to the SCLC. She also requests that Dr. King puts out an announcement so that listeners can tune into his radio broadcast on WLIB.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Dinkar Sakrikar writes Dr. King in reference to a proposed statue of Gandhi for a children's park. The statue seeks to reflect friendly relations between India and the United States. They ask Dr. King for his consideration along with a swift response.

Letter from Vivian Cintron to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vivian Cintron, who is a student, offers her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965

Dr. King shares his contentment with the company of Pastor Charles Westphal and the rest of the French Protestant Federation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Commission on Community Activity and Organization lists various members from different organizations.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Method of Ex Abstraction

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosopher Alfred Whitehead's theory of extensive abstraction.

God

Dr. King wrote these notes on the concept of God while reading "Science and the Modern World" and "Religion in the Making" by Alfred North Whitehead. He quotes Whitehead, stating that God is the "perpetual vision of the road which leads to the deeper realities."

Letter from Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath, President of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, thanks Dr. King for speaking out not only against the Vietnam War, but also in support of helping the poor. Rabbi Eisendrath tells Dr. King that he has"ignited the conscience of America, as no other man, on the struggle for racial justice."

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

The Urban Coalition National Coordinator's Weekly Report

Friday, February 9, 1968

In the Urban Coalition's weekly report, the National Coordinator notifies members of the events that had occurred within the past week. The report covers local coalitions, legislation, private employment, and the steering committee.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Monday, October 17, 1966

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Fiers an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Dallas, Texas for the International Convention.

MLK's Reply to Invitation to Speak at Centennial United Church

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Dr. King regrets to inform Reverend William Morris that due to his busy schedule and previous inability to work directly with the civil rights struggle, he can not accept the invitation to speak at Centennial United Church.

Letter from Edward Rutledge and Jack Wood to Robert Weaver

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Edward Rutledge and Jack E. Wood Jr. represent the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Center for Fair Housing. They expound on housing, planning policies, and programs for New York City. In addition, they affirm their belief that policy-makers should include and reflect the concerns of the minority.

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.

MLK Statement to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement to Time Magazine, Dr. King responds to President John F. Kennedy's call for new civil rights legislation.

Pilgrimage to Nonviolence

Dr. King's essay "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" provides a replete account of the thinkers, ideas and sentiments responsible for his pledge to nonviolence.

Recent Court Guidelines Concerning Demonstrations

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

This memorandum outlines recent legislation that permits "street demonstrations as an exercise of freedom of speech and of assembly." Specific court cases in the state of Alabama are also mentioned throughout the text.

Mass Meeting Featuring MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1960

This document is a program for a mass meeting sponsored by the SCLC and the Raleigh Citizens Association. Dr. King is the principal speaker of this meeting.

Post Card Front from Alice and Jun Hayakawa to Coretta King

The Hayakawa family send this photo greeting to Mrs. King, addressing her as "Corrie." The family expresses their concern for Mrs. King and hopes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King following a recent accident.

Women Strike for Peace: How Can You Be Silent?

Thursday, April 1, 1965

This newsletter exemplifies the struggle that Vietnamese children faced during the war. It also urges many to protest in order to prevent young children from dying.

Outline for Why Does History Move?

Dr. King's sermon outline references Hegel and Marx in relation to questions surrounding the concept of history.

Letter from Pat Mutzberg to Dora McDonald Regarding Meeting

Friday, June 9, 1967

Pat Mutzberg of the Atlanta Committee for International Visitors writes Miss McDonald to confirm Dr. King's upcoming appointment with Nigerian visitors.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

Congressman Robert T. Stafford, U. S. Representative from Vermont, informs Dr. King he has signed the discharge petition regarding the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

This New York writer castigates Dr. King and refers to him as "the worst phoney [sic] in the country."