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"VIETNAM"

Anaximenes

Dr. King writes notes about the views of philosopher Anaximenes on the universe, comparing them to those of Thales and Anaximander.

Letter from Theodore Lozada to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thedore Lozada offers his condolences to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Calhoun Geiger to MLK

Friday, April 26, 1963

Calhoun Geiger, director of the Peace Education Program, invites Dr. King and his family to a summer family camp hosted by the American Friends Service Committee, Inc. Geiger explains that John Yungblut suggested that Dr. King might be interested in attending.

SCLC Annual Board Meeting Agenda

This 1965 SCLC annual board meeting agenda lists several key figures who are intended to discuss their respective projects and strategies during this two-day session.

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Invitation for the Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

This is an invitation for the Inauguration of the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

Letter from Max Tak to MLK

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Mr. Tak requests a statement for the Elseviers Weekblad cover story titled, "Is Satan Still Alive?" from Dr. King.

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

Church, Negro

Dr. King provides insight on the interaction between the church and the Negro youth.

Letter From Paul Brest to Members of the SCLC

Monday, November 14, 1966

Paul Brest, on behalf of Marian E. Wright, alerts Dr. King and other SCLC staff members about legal initiatives to desegregate schools in Mississippi and other southern states.

Letter to Mr. Walter Simcich from MLK

Tuesday, September 7, 1965

Dr. King informs Walter Simcich that he is "deeply grateful" to have been extended this invitation. Furthermore, Dr. King notifies Mr. Simcich that he is unable to accept this speaking engagement due to his heavy schedule involving the nonviolence movement.

Ritschl (God)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl’s “The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation.”

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Monday, June 4, 1962

Dr. King issues an urgent request for Robert Kennedy's immediate involvement in the prosecution of four students who were arrested while engaged in a peaceful demonstration in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King has also received information of gross violations of the students' constitutional rights.

Letter from Ethelyn Hall to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Ethelyn L. Hall, a student at the University of Houston, writes Dr. King in reference to SCLC's distribution of literature. Hall is preparing a term paper for a sociology class and requests any available literature relating to civil rights, interracial relations, and racism. She is also interested in learning the purposes and functions of the SCLC.

Letter of Recommendation for Sally Cantor

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Mrs. W. M. Taylor, an English teacher at Grady High School, writes a letter of recommendation on behalf of Sally Cantor, a Russell H. Bull Scholarship applicant.

Letter from Louis Toney to MLK

Saturday, May 29, 1965

Army veteran Louis Toney attempts to solicit a job with the SCLC, citing military experience, a college degree and ordination as characteristics that qualify him for the job.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Sadye Brooks

Friday, April 28, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to the Brooks family on the recent loss of their beloved husband and father.

You and the Poor People's Campaign

This document contains detailed information regarding the Poor People's Campaign. This document also discusses the Satyagraha movement, a nonviolent movement that means "truth force."

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

Letter from Berta Reller to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

Berta Reller writes a letter to Dr. King regarding an article she has enclosed. The letter discusses recent riots and that extremists from the left and right wings are motivating them. Reller believes that there should be more focus on education.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, June 3, 1964

In this letter dated June 3, 1964, Joan Daves sends Dr. King two copies of his contract for for his book entitled "Why We Can't Wait". The terms for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" have already been cleared.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Original Sin

From "The Epistle of the Romans," Dr. King records Karl Barth's observations regarding original sin, which are compared to views of the Bible, Saint Augustine and the Reformers.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 7, 1963

John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from David H. McKillop to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964

David McKillop informs Dr. King that the United States Consulate General in Barcelona received a letter from five Spanish citizens congratulating him for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from J. V. Jones to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

J.V. Jones questions whether Dr. King's position on the Vietnam war is helping the black race because he believes otherwise. Jones also encloses a Walter Winchell article from the Los Angeles Harold Examiner.