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"VIETNAM"

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

Rev. Jackson updates Dr. King on his recent activities, how hard he has been fighting for equality for all Americans, and regrets to inform him that he is ill.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, February 19, 1962

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Letter from Stacey McCloud to MLK

Stacey McCloud writes to Dr. King suggesting that he, Stokley Carmichael and others relocate to Africa and march.

The Nationalism of Ezra

This note card outlines Ezra views on "mixed marriages."

Herbert Hill Statement Before the House Committee on Education and Labor

Friday, August 17, 1962

Herbert Hill, National Labor Director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, addresses the House Committee on Education and Labor regarding the questionable practices conducted by the leadership of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, January 13, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Monday, June 28, 1965

This letter to Sargent Shriver provides details about the SCLC's 1965 Annual Convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King also extends an invitation for Mr. Shriver to open the conference with an address about poverty, unemployment, and urban migration.

Letter from Mary A. Edmonds to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mary A. Edmonds expresses her disapproval of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Margo

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Margo for her inquiry about summer work with the SCLC and suggests she contact Hosea Williams about the SCOPE project for the following summer.

Crusade for Citizenship

Friday, October 21, 1966

This check was issued to Chauncey Williams for his assistance with the Crusade For Citizenship's voter registration campaign.

Newspaper Clipping - "In Memoriam" MLK, NY Amsterdam News

Saturday, April 13, 1968

This newspaper clipping is one of several full page "In Memoriam" dedications featured in various New York City newspapers following the assassination of Dr. King. The clippings accompany a letter from the Public Relations Director of the NAACP to the Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, newly installed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's death.

Statement by Norman Truesdell About Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965

Norman Truesdell refutes Congressman William Dickenson's speech before the United States House of Representatives in which Dickenson claimed Reverend Truesdell left the Alabama Freedom March due to the immoral conduct of the marchers. Reverend Truesdell asserts that he left due to his studies at Wartburg Theological Seminary.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Knowledge)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Gregory Bergman to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

Mr. Bergman asks if he could receive a copy of Dr. King's speech given at Riverside Church. He regarded the speech as "one of the great speeches of our time."

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Abraham Ribicoff thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and expresses his contentment with the passing of the Civil Rights Bill. Ribicoff hopes for the progression of the nation in providing equal opportunities for all.

Sin

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's "Pensees."

Telegram from MLK to Bluford Jackson Extending Congratulations

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this telegram dated 1/26/68 addressed to Mr. Jackson, Dr. King extends congratulations to Dr. Richard Francis on his appointment as Director of the Sunmount State School.

Letter from Amnesty International to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965

On behalf of Denmark's chapter of Amnesty International, Mr. Bent Ostergaard writes Dr. King extending a speaking invitation. He is hopeful that Dr. King will return to Europe and accept the invitation to speak to youth and instill in them the significance of justice.

Letter From MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Friday, February 9, 1968

This response letter, dated February 9, 1968, was addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Marshall Shepard

Friday, November 17, 1967

Dora McDonald, Secretary to Dr. King, writes Rev. Marshall Shepard, Jr. to accept a speaking invitation at their 8:00 a.m. Sunday Service on behalf of Reverend King.

Executive "Action Team" of Dr. King's SCLC Leads Aggressive Programs for Human Rights

Monday, February 5, 1968

This news release discusses programs developed by the SCLC Executive Action Team to aggressively address the human rights struggles of the American Negro. Some of these programs include the Citizenship Education Program, Operation Breadbasket and the Urban Leadership Program.

Letter from Mrs. Sammie Adams to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966

Mrs. Sammie Adams, a 67-year-old widow, writes an emotional appeal to Dr. and Mrs. King in an effort to collect money for Easter clothes for her children. She acknowledges that she previously donated to Dr. King and the cause for civil rights and would benefit from some assistance.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Joan Daves urges Dora McDonald to provide notice of Dr. King's public appearances to Harper so that books can be sold at those events.

Jesus

Dr. King outlines some thoughts on the effect Jesus' life had on his followers.

Letter from Archbishop Hallinan to MLK

In this letter, Archbishop Hallinan offers his words of gratitude to Dr. King, for his work, and requests a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here."

Religion and Science

Dr. King writes about the different perspectives of the moralist and scientist, saying a person can be both.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Pickett

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Pickett's poem and some questions that she sent. He offers condolences for the loss of her husband and promises that the "redemptive suffering of few brings new life to many."

Letter from Resident of Dade County, Florida to MLK

An anonymous writer requests Dr. King's assistance for youth in the Juvenile Court System of Dade County, Florida.