Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"VIETNAM"

People in Action: Unknown Heroes

Thursday, May 10, 1962
South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

This New York Amsterdam News article by Dr. King introduces two unknown heroes of the Civil Rights Movement in the South, Esau Jenkins and Billy Fleming. Jenkins taught the riders on his buses how to read and write so they could qualify to vote. This idea was the basis for SCLC's Citizenship School program. Fleming, an undertaker in Clarendon County, South Carolina, was a leader in the Briggs v. Elliott school desegregation lawsuit, the earliest of five suits to be combined in the US Supreme Court?s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Home Rule

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King urges President Johnson to support the administration bill on Home Rule for Washington, D.C. rather than pursue a compromise.

Statement on the Muhammed Ali World Heavyweight Title Controversy

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

An unknown author declares a boycott of all fight games until the Boxing Commission restores Muhammad Ali's World Heavyweight Title.

Prospective Negotiation Procedure with Merchants

Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA)

This draft document outlines a plan to eradicate racial discrimination during the Civil Rights Movement. It includes a detailed list of prospective negotiation procedures with merchants and a timeline for events in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, February 11, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Honolulu, HI, Hawaii (HI)

Dr. King sends Dr. Mays a check for $200 and informs him that he will not be able to attend the Founders' Day celebration.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961
Nashville, TN

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967
VIETNAM, FRANCE, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from James C. Gray, M.D. to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. James Gray of Washington, D.C. encloses three checks to Dr. King for the SCLC on behalf of his reading club. He encourages Dr. King to continue in his "great works."

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

Thursday, March 9, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Telegram from Selma Frazier to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Selma Frazier and family send their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.

Promotional Article for Why We Can't Wait

Birmingham, AL

This Harper released publication contains a preview of the religious books to be published in the summer and fall of 1964. Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" is featured with the byline "The 'Man of the Year' writes the 'Book of the Year'."

Man

Dr. King wrote these notes on Man from Psalms 89:48. He describes that while the Bible describes man as mortal, here appears the direct affirmation that every man shall die.

Call to Survival

Sunday, November 5, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Missouri (MO)

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Letter from Albert Turner to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Albert Turner requests financial assistance from Dr. King to aid with the voting campaign against Governor Wallace.

Knowledge

Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.

Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Stimma

Friday, April 5, 1968

Maria Stimma wrote this letter to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.

Monotheism

Dr. King cites passages in the sixth century BCE Second Isaiah (chapters 40-55) as the first clear evidence of monotheism.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Letter from Zelma Dodd to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

Zelma Dodd sends Dr. King her best wishes along with two poems entitled, "The Soul of a Black Man," and "A Negro Soldier."

Letter From MLK to Reverend Sanders

In this letter, Dr. King expresses gratitude for the efforts Rev. Sanders has taken toward battling poverty.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 3, 1965
UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

H. C. Huntley invites Dr. King to come speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Scotland during Holy Week.

Letter from James McLaurin to MLK and Andrew Young

Tuesday, March 15, 1966
Chicago, IL

James McLaurin asks Dr. King to spend part of a day with the students and faculty at Garrett. The topic that they want Dr. King to speak about is the seminary's role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Washington, D.C., Richmond, VA

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gulliace

Dr. King writes Mr. Gulliace thanking him for requesting him to comment on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life after Death." However, due to Dr. King's busy schedule with the Movement and ministry, he cannot commit the time to assist Mr. Gulliace.

Telegram from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL

Talk show host and columnist Irv Kupcinet invites Dr. King to make an appearance on his television panel. Mr. Kupcinet discloses knowledge of Dr. King's visit to Chicago for an announcement on July 24, 1965, and encourages the civil rights leader to appear on the show later that afternoon.

Letter from Carolyn Fewell to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Mrs. Fewell, secretarial assistant to the dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, thanks Dr. King for his sending his book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eugene Exman about MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1961
New York (NY), Missouri (MO)

Ms. McDonald writes Harper & Brothers executive to confirm receipt of his letter to Dr. King dated June 19, 1961 requesting a proposed timeline for the completion of a forthcoming book. Ms. McDonald reassures Harper and Brothers that Dr. King is adhering to the request and will take five weeks off to ensure completion.