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"VIETNAM"

Introduction of Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King introduces Robert Kennedy at a gathering in Jackson, Mississippi, calling him a "capable statesman" with a "great social vision."

Letter From Christine Heath to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Ms. Christine Heath, a high school student, asks for information on how "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, has affected Dr. King.

The Black Rose: Ruth Reese

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Ruth Reese, also known as "The Black Rose," thanks Dr. King for his support. This document includes a detailed biography of the vocalist, as well as, critic responses on her performances.

Letter from Toyozo Takata to MLK

Toyozo Takata writes Dr. King thanking him for enduring all negativity when fighting for peace.

Letter from R. Belui to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

R. Belui thanks Dr. King for his courage in the fight for social justice. He also expresses his wishes for Dr. King's to be a presidential candidate.

Miracle

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible."

Letter from David C. Morton to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

David C. Morton, Campus Coordinator at Biola College, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and other campaign materials for Choice '68.

Letter from William Connor to MLK

Saturday, August 12, 1967

William Connor encourages Dr. King to continue his efforts to speak the truth and practice Christianity. He emphasizes that there is no need to ignore the important issues of our time. Connor states, "Now, we've either got to put up, or shut up-as the saying goes."

God

Dr. King cites and comments on a passage from I Chronicles about the gods that are idols.

Letter from the Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Thursday, August 1, 1963

The Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund informs Dr. King that they have distributed copies of the Letter from Birmingham Jail. Those who read the letter were impressed and described it as a "masterful job." The organization contributes to the SCLC for lobbying the passage of the President's Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Death

Dr. King records some notes on death.

Letter to MLK from Carl Fuqua

Friday, February 1, 1963

Rev. Carl Fuqua writes a letter to Dr. King expressing regret that he could not attend the NAACP meeting due to a sudden virus.

Ritschl (Christology)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.

Letter to Twelve Southern Governors

Dr. King addresses twelve southern governors regarding the urgency of a unification between the Negro community and government leaders. Dr. King requests a meeting between the governors and himself to address and resolve their issues concerning race relations.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politics

Monday, December 20, 1965

Paul Albert forwards this letter to all individuals invited to and interested in the Shoreham Conference, in which Liberals address the shortcomings of American politics.

Bible

Dr. King compares the views of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Friedrich Schleiermacher on the Christian Bible.

Letter from Oral Roberts to MLK

In this letter, noted evangelist Oral Roberts thanks "my dear partner" for making possible a trip to Vietnam and encloses a special report on the mission. Roberts conducted more than 300 crusades on six continents during his ministry.

Temporary Injunction by City of Birmingham Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

Judge W. A. Jenkins issues a temporary injunction against Wyatt Tee Walker based on the affidavits of Captain G. V. Evans and Captain George Wall. The order prohibits involvement with "mass street parades or mass processions or like demonstrations without a permit" and any other "acts calculated to cause breaches of the peace" in Birmingham, Alabama.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Letter from Lou House of Chicago's WAAF Radio to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Mr. House, a representative of WAAF radio station in Chicago, forwards a letter to Dr. King and mentions his hopes for Dr. King and Al Raby to do a weekly report about the Chicago Freedom Movement.

Telegram from Malcolm X to MLK

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

Malcolm X offers Dr. King assistance with the situation in St. Augustine, including the organization of self-defense units.

Letter from Nels F. S. Ferre to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Dr. Ferre commends Dr. King on writing "Where Do We Go From Here?" He also expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his position of leadership and for including him in the author's list.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."