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"VIETNAM"

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

Chicago, IL, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC)

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Blandena Lee Kossodo

Tuesday, November 29, 1966
SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland

Dora McDonald writes Blandena Lee Kossodo expressing that Dr. King is honored to have been offered to write the introduction to her book. However, Dr. King has to decline because he is writing his own book and for other publications.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Maryland (MD), New York (NY)

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1962
Virginia (VA)

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 31, 1962

The Gandhi Society for Human Rights lists the names of individuals whom they would like to serve on the organization's Board of Directors in which Dr. King serves as the Honorary President.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King records teachings of German theologian and philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher that Dr. King feels "make his theology a religious psychology."

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

MLK Notes

Dr. King expresses concern about common attitudes towards the Church. In his words, "So often people will do a good thing, and then spoil it by some ugly twist of the spirit."

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

Monday, August 13, 1962
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.

Rejection Letter to Nusas Journal

Monday, May 24, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King informs the editor of Nusas Journal that he will not be able to contribute an article.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI, Los Angeles, CA, Dallas, TX

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Telegram from Andrew Hieskell and A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
New York (NY)

Dr. King receives this telegram from Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph regarding the newly appointed chief executive of the National Urban Coalition.

Telegram from Muhammad Ali to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

This message of support from Muhammad Ali was sent to Dr. King during his stay at the County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, SWEDEN, INDIA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Catholicism

Dr. King documents some insights regarding the history of the Roman Catholic church.

Letter from Ralph Saylor to MLK

VIETNAM

Mr. Saylor assures Dr. King that he still has the support of the white community regardless of his stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from William S. Stein to MLK

Friday, May 6, 1966
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL

William Stein informs Dr. King that the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church will be contributing to SCLC.

News from the AFL-CIO: Labor News Conference

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), New York, NY

AFL-CIO's public affairs program, the Labor News Conference. Donald Slaiman, Director of the AFL-CIO's Department of Civil Rights was questioned by Alan Adams of Business Week Magazine and Stanley Leward of Scripps-Howard Newspapers. The three have a discussion about apprenticeship opportunities for minority youths, particularly of Negro and Puerto Rican heritage.

Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie Writes to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967
NETHERLANDS, SWITZERLAND

Johan Keijser, writing for the Board of the Foundation of Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie, sends a letter to Dr. King. It includes a list of names of those whom the group has invited to form a committee of support for their efforts in creating a "provisional world government." The list includes artists, intellectuals, national government leaders, and religious leaders from all over the world. Remarkably, it also includes "father of the hydrogen bomb" Edward Teller.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This memorandum regarding SCLC liabilities, income and bank balances, was sent from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. King.

Foreward by MLK: Famous Negro American Series

Dr. King discusses the contributions of Negro Americans to American society, past and present, in this foreward for the publication: Famous Negro American Series.

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), New York (NY)

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Letter from the Faculty of the Tuskegee Institute to President Kennedy

Thursday, May 16, 1963
Tuskegee, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Members of the faculty and staff of Tuskegee Institute issue a plea to President John F. Kennedy to intervene in the Birmingham crisis of 1963. They request that the President use an upcoming speech to discuss Constitutional rights, send the FBI to Alabama to investigate "charges of police brutality," and revoke federal funds that support segregation and persuade business leaders to desegregate public facilities.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Friday, July 23, 1965
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Kenneth B. Keating, the Chairman of the Population Crisis Committee, invited Dr. King to join the committee. The organization seeks to help deal with the growing population and ever scarcer resources.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968
Georgia (GA)

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Georgia Council on Human Relations

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The author informs the readers about the poverty problem in Georgia. They claim that the AFDC or "Aid to Families of Dependent Children" needs improvement. The author also mentions issues such as unemployment, education and voter registration.

An Ambitious Dream Confronts Reality

Wednesday, June 23, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King talks about the Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE) as well as the political changes that have occurred in Georgia.