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"VIETNAM"

SCLC News Release: The State of Negro Education in the South

Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA)

This SCLC news release discusses the terrible educational conditions endured by African American students in the South. It also highlights effective solutions to exposing "negro youngsters" to better teachers and a better quality of learning.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details an amended budget for the SCLC's Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA

Martha Kennedy thanks Dr. King for sending her a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Kennedy feels that Dr. King's leadership is well emphasized in the context of the book. Particularly, she finds the chapter on Black Power to be "valuable." Mrs. Kennedy hopes for much success to Dr. King and his great work.

Letter to MLK from Rose Spann

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Montgomery, AL

Rosa Spann of West Kinney Jr. High School, expresses her appreciation to Dr. King by writing a poem called "The Undergrounders."

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Leon R. Martin

Monday, August 12, 1963
Michigan (MI)

SCLC Director of Research and Information Harry Boyte communicates with Leon Martin to thank him for the thoughtful words made in response to Dr. King's article in "The New Leader." Boyte tells Martin that Negroes in America are at a place where they will no longer be forced to wait for equality. Boyte asserts that only the complete participation of Negroes in every part of life in America will "suffice at this juncture in history."

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.W. Finlator about Preaching Invitation

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King offers deep regrets to Rev. Finlator for his inability to accept an invitation to preach at The Pullen Memorial Baptist Church.

Levels of Love

Dr. King outlines several levels of love, such as Christian love, utilitarianism love and romantic love.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Irvin G. Perkins

Thursday, June 16, 1966
CANADA

Dr. King informs Rev. Perkins that he will not be available to preach at Donlands United Church in Toronto. Dr. King also writes that Mrs. King thoroughly enjoyed her visit to Toronto.

Letter from Mrs. Lewis Cooper to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 22, 1967
Chicago, IL, Nebraska (NE)

Mrs. Cooper writes Ms. McDonald to invite Dr. King to speak at the Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago in January 1968.

Letter from Herbert J. Kramer to John W. Bloomer

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Herbert J. Kramer informs the managing editor of Birmingham News, about "America's New Commitment" and the "Plowshare Pledge."

House Un-American Activities Committee

Friday, May 15, 1964
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Mississippi (MS), New Orleans, LA

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

Letter from Donald Keys to MLK

Tuesday, August 31, 1965
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Donald F. Keys writes to Dr. King about Dr. King's invitation to speak at a planned Washington Mobilization on Vietnam. Keys also tells Dr. King that he may have to go to Africa at the time of the meeting, and requests that Mrs. King deliver his address in his absence.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

Indiana (IN)

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

Letter to MLK from Robert McAfee Brown to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), VIETNAM, California (CA)

Mr. McAfee requests that Dr. King issues a statement, and host a service in his Church, supporting Bill Coffin.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK about Selections from "Strength to Love"

Friday, December 30, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, Campe encloses payment for the rights of an English-language textbook to reprint five selections from Dr. King's "Strength to Love".

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Letter from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy Forwarded to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

John L. Murphy writes Dr. King to forward him a letter for the Reverend from US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that his office received in error. In the forwarded letter, Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his willingness to contribute to a series of oral interviews for the John F. Kennedy library.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Letter from Charles S. Joelson to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Joelson of New Jersey responds to Dr. King's recent letter urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. He informs Dr. King that he shares his view and was one of the 148 members who voted against it.

Ossie Davis Defines Blackness and Whiteness

In this document,Ossie Davis uses Roget's Thesaurus and defines the words "whiteness" and "blackness" only to find many positive outcomes for whiteness and an abundance of negative synonyms for blackness.

Religious Leadership

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), GERMANY, Washington, D.C.

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Hartford, CT

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

Letter from Clifford Park to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
CANADA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The President of the United Church of Canada, London Conference, writes Dr. King attempting to receive a notification of his availability to be the devotional speaker at their annual conference.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Minnesota (MN), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, New York (NY), Nebraska (NE)

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Birthday Card from Margarite Foley

This birthday, wishing the recipient "increasing joy," was sent by Margarite Foley.

Congratulations Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, January 14, 1964
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Governor Nelson Rockefeller extends best wishes to Dr. King on his birthday and congratulates him for being honored as the Man-of-the Year.