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"WESTERN SAHARA"

Letter from Edna R. McKinnon to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967
California (CA)

Edna McKinnon praises Dr. King for his wonderful work with the SCLC and its effect on the "entire world." She agrees with Dr. King's nonviolent philosophy and approach to American military intervention in Vietnam. Ms. McKinnon is the sister of Jeanette Rankin, the first woman of Congress, and the only member to vote against U.S. entry into both world wars.

Manuscript by MLK dated 2/3/62 entitled "People in Action"

Saturday, February 3, 1962
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

In this 1962 draft for his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King emphasizes that school desegregation and the Rosa Parks incident are crucial turning points in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Walter Mondale to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Congressman Mondale writes to Dr. King asking for feedback on the bill he's trying to pass, which is intended to provide government assistance for home ownership.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Democracy

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines Ralph Barton Perry's views on Democracy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

The Christian Church and Communist Atheism

Missouri (MO), New York (NY)

Helmut Gollwitzer, a Protestant theologian, completes this body of work entitled "The Christian Church and Communist Atheism." The author states that, "socialists may be Christians, but Christians must be socialists."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Spicher

Dr. King informs Mrs. Spicher that he is unable to assist her with the issues from her previous letter due to limited resources.

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Antiwar Slogans

Tuesday, March 21, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Spring Mobilization Committee issues a list of official slogans for Vietnam War protest placards. Groups and individuals who intend to protest are asked to use these slogans on their self-made placards with the phrase "STOP THE WAR NOW" printed at the bottom.

Letter from Norman Thomas to the New York Times Editor

Monday, August 28, 1967
New York, NY

Norman Thomas cites an excerpt from a story by Peter Khiss entitled "Rowan Terms Dr. King's Stand on War a Peril to Rights Gains." Mr. Thomas asserts that the statement is incorrect and that he whole "heartily" applauds Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Civil-Righters Isolation

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., California (CA), BAHAMAS, Mississippi (MS), VIETNAM, Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Arizona (AZ)

David Lawrence states that the recent initiatives of Negro leaders are hindering the overall mission of the Civil Rights Movement. He believes that Negro groups are defeating their own cause.

The Negro

Atlanta, GA

This poem describes the strength and perseverance of the Negro during difficult times.

Letter from Alice Sargent to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Alice Sargent, the Assistant Director of Student Activities at Temple University, inquires what role the students can play in the Civil Rights Movement and sends a sample of one of the students' editorials.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967
VIETNAM, FRANCE, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Autograph Request from Donald Koos

Donald Koos of Detroit, Michigan requests an autograph from Dr. King for his collection.

New Left Versus Old Liberals in Battle for Dr. King's Soul

Washington, D.C.

Conservative syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak claim that Dr. King's soul is being challenged by various factions with whom he has associated. Evans and Novak question Dr. King's relationship with Stokely Carmichael by reminding him of his promise never to work with Mr. Carmichael again.

Integrating Elementary Schools in Berkeley

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), New Jersey (NJ)

This article details the integration of several Berkeley area elementary schools. The Presidents of each school give feedback regarding the public's response and their plans on how they will proceed.

Letter from Edouard Theis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963
FRANCE

Mr. Theis makes reference of having spoke to a French group of non-violent Christians about Dr. King's struggle for freedom. Mr. Theis suggests a reproduction of "Letter From The Birmingham Jail" as well as the distribution of the French translation as a chapter in a French Nonviolent Action book.

Letter from Nels F. S. Ferre to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Iowa (IA)

Dr. Ferre commends Dr. King on writing "Where Do We Go From Here?" He also expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his position of leadership and for including him in the author's list.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Gladys Foreman

Friday, February 15, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dora McDonald thanks Ms. Gladys Foreman for her contribution of stamps.

Letter from Mrs. Bonnie Cohen to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Bonnie Cohen, a senior at Eastern Michigan University, writes to Rev. Abernathy requesting his thoughts on the problem of "crime in the streets."

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from Allen L. Johnson

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Mississippi (MS)

Southern Christian Leadership Conference board member Allen L. Johnson wrote this letter to Rev. Abernathy shortly after Dr. King's death. Johnson expressed his support of Rev. Abernathy's leadership of the organization.

Letter from Terrie to MLK

Saturday, March 2, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The author informs Dr. King of her
inability to continue working for the SCLC due to conflicting personal issues and emotional instability. She asserts that the work of the SCLC is too important for her to remain "jumping around in the organization." She also informs Dr. King that the SCLC is family and that she is only leaving for personal reasons. Lastly, she requests that other primary members of the organization are informed of this departure.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Letter to the Public of Montgomery, Alabama

Montgomery, AL

The ministerial leaders of Montgomery address the problems of discrimination and segregation within the city's bus system. The ministers form a plan of action to eliminate such practices and attain a equal society for all.

Letter from Rosa A. King to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA)

Rosa King invites Dr. King to be a speaker at Central Baptist Church's 14th Annual Friends Day in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Progress

Dr. King writes that progress has to do with value in human life.

Letter from MLK to Elodia Trevino

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Texas (TX)

Dr. King thanks Elodia Trevino for her support of the Freedom Movement and calls her letter a "contribution to the morale and spirit" of the movement.

Man

Dr. King writes his thoughts on man.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965
Alabama (AL), Baltimore, MD, Montgomery, AL, GERMANY, Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Marion, AK, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

The Limitation of Experience

Dr. King discusses the three sources of authority in religion: the church, the Bible, and experience. Dr. King cites the philosophical perception of an experience from Immanuel Kant's description. In addition, Dr. King compares different persons to associate the difference between age and experience.