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"Washington (WA)"

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL)

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

His Attitude Toward Higher Criticism

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Immanuel Kant's book "The Preface to the First Edition.

A Journey of Conscience

VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Washington, D.C., SOUTH AFRICA, ALGERIA

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

MLK's notecard regarding social gospel

Dr. King outlines his views on social gospel.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, October 31, 1966
Louisville, KY, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Cincinnati, OH, Tennessee (TN), West Virginia (WV), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Kentucky (KY)

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

I Will Vote For You

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Joe Kozne proclaims allegiance to Dr. King and his political aspirations if George Wallace, the governor of Alabama, runs for presidency.

Letter from Clifford Park to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
CANADA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The President of the United Church of Canada, London Conference, writes Dr. King attempting to receive a notification of his availability to be the devotional speaker at their annual conference.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

Letter from E. L. Gayden to MLK

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
Kansas (KS), ISRAEL

E. L. Gayden writes Dr. King regarding the planning of pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Gayden offers the services of the John Brown Monument and Historical Association for the organization of the tour. He also mentions that he represents a travel agency and extends his assistance to Dr. King.

Letter from Wendell Morgan to SCLC

Monday, July 31, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Wendell Morgan encloses a check to SCLC on behalf of the Howard University Campus Chest.

Postcard from Dekker Family

NETHERLANDS

The Dekker family of Holland sends its support to Dr. King.

Chicago Freedom Rally

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.

Letter from Mr. Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter Mr. Canfield Of Harper & Row, Publishers, informs Dr. King that a certificate of recognition from the National Conference of Christians and Jews for "Where Do We Go From Here?" is being sent to him as an award. Mr. Canfield expresses his belief the book will continue to sell.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunch to Raphael Gould

Thursday, May 13, 1965
New York (NY)

Though Ralph J. Bunche agrees with the "Unique Value and Importance of Education for Peace", he is unsure to the effectiveness of the principle.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

MLK Examination Blue Book

Friday, May 23, 1947

Dr. King used this "Blue Book" to record answers for a Bible exam taken on May 23, 1947.

Letter from Glenn E. Smiley to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Smiley requests an endorsement from Dr. King on the creation of a non-violent training film by The Fellowship of Reconciliation.

Letter from Henry Moon to Rev. Abernathy concerning "In Memoriam" Reproductions

Thursday, April 18, 1968
New York, NY

This letter from Henry Lee Moon to Rev. Abernathy, accompanies enclosures of reproductions of documents associated with the "In Memoriam" sections of various newspapers in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

America

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King quotes a statement from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the country's "historic situation in which the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

Letter from Illinois High School Student Beth Allen to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

High school student Beth Allen writes Dr. King inquiring about how she can contribute to the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C.

This telegram forwarded by Rodney Clurman to Dr. King sends word regarding the need for transportation, food, medical supplies and water. Clurman also makes mention of a smallpox epidemic, stating that fifty million may die from the disease. He closes by encouraging the Reverend to wire him if interested in accompanying him to Scotland.

Telegram from Prentiss Childs to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Los Angeles, CA, Washington, D.C.

Prentiss Childs, producer of the CBS news program "Face the Nation," invites Rev. Abernathy to speak on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
VIETNAM, Michigan (MI)

Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Woodruff praise Dr. King for his stance on the Vietnam War and enclose a check for the SCLC.

Letter from James Scheuer to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

In this letter to Dr. King, Congressman Scheuer asks Dr. King to testify at a hearing of the Select Subcommittee on Labor of the House Committee on Education and Labor about House Resolution 12962. This bill focused on creating a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968
New York (NY)

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. to MLK

Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. requests the presence of Dr. King to serve on a panel discussing Title VII and Equal Employment. The Department of Labor event also included civil rights lumaniaries such as A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer and Whitney Young. Roosevelt, fifth child of the late president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, served as the Chairman of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from May 26, 1965 to May 11, 1966.

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.