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Pittsburgh Courier: Mays

Saturday, April 29, 1950

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays mourns the recent deaths of Charles Drew and Carter Woodson. Both were highly acclaimed individuals, not only because of their race but also in their areas of study. Drew developed large-scale blood banks during WWI and Woodson cultivated the idea of Black History Month.

Letter from Hano Bailey to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967

Hano Bailey praises Dr. King for asking black athletes "to sit out of the Olympics." He informs Dr. King that there are 15 teachers at his University writing letters to their relatives in support of Dr. King's campaign.

Those Attending Breakfast with MLK

List of attendees for a breakfast meeting at Cornell University in Ithaca (NY) when Dr. King was on campus to deliver his sermon, "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life."

The Free Southern Theater

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

Dr. King To Lead Holy Land Tour

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release regarding Dr. King's planned Pilgrimage to the Holy Land in November.

Sworn Deposition of MLK

Monday, December 10, 1956

Dr. King records an event that happened on a train between Nashville and Montgomery, during which a policeman denied him access to the general waiting room.

Cable from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Payment

Monday, January 29, 1968

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King references payment by Editora Senzala Ltd. for the Portuguese-language rights to "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Sister M. Angelice to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Sister Angelice, Acting President of Ursiline College in Louisville, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and expresses admiration for his civil rights efforts.

Letter to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize Nominations

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

The writer informs Dr. King of Dean Gunnar Helander's campaign to have L. John Collins nominated for the 1968 Nobel Peace Prize. He requests that Dr. King nominate Collins for this prestigious award.

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Letter of Condolence to Mrs. King and Children from Nagarajan and Family

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Dr. G. Nagarajan, a professor at Allen University in South Carolina, sent Mrs. King this letter to express sympathy following the death of Dr. King. The content of the letter compared Dr. King's philosophy and cause to Gandhi.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1968

Harry Wachtel gives Dr. King a monetary birthday gift that he tells Dr. King to use on a much needed vacation.

Letter from Annette P. Johnson to Reverend Charles C. Carpenter

Tuesday, May 14, 1963

Annette P. Johnson writes Bishop Carpenter concerning her initiative to seek better understanding of his status on supporting racial equality. Johnson believes that Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" was directed at Reverend Carpenter and other Southern clergymen like him.

Memorandum from MLK to SCLC

Saturday, February 8, 1958

In this memorandum to the representatives of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Dr. King encloses two resolutions that the Executive Board approved. The resolutions state that a letter should be sent to Senator Thomas C. Hennings and Attorney General William P. Rogers. Dr. King suggests that the resolutions be adopted at all of the SCLC's mass meetings, scheduled for February 12th.

Letter from MLK to Clifford P. Case

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Clifford Case, a United States Senator from New Jersey, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick

Monday, May 17, 1965

Andrew Young instructs Dora McDonald to respond to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick's invitation to Dr. King. Ms. McDonald affirms Dr. King's arrival date and informs Mr. Kirkpatrick that they must accommodate the cost expense for two. She asserts that it is necessary for Dr. King to travel with at least one of his aides.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964

Thomas Elliott Huntley, member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Frank Clarke to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965

Frank Clarke requests a letter of recommendation from Dr. King. Mr. Clarke seeks to obtain the position of the Assistant Press Secretary to the President.

Letter from Leon Forer to Dr.King

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Leon Forer expresses that Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here" is a "sobering testament to our times." In this letter he also makes a suggestion to change the appendix.

SANE Action: Citizens' Milk Strike

Friday, February 16, 1962

As an economic act against pollution and a nuclear war, the National Committee For A SANE Nuclear Policy stages a Citizens' Milk Strike.

Letter from Edward Kirsch to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

Edward Kirsch, Executive Director of The Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center extends warmest sympathies to Mrs. King during her time of bereavement. He writes, "Dr. King was greatly admired by all of us as an inspiring leader, a true humanitarian and an advocate of peace and justice for all people."

Student Shot in Accident in Hyde Park High

Gerald Patton is listed as being in good condition by Billings hospital following be shot in the right hip by fellow student Ronald Smith. Patrolman Walter Johnson said the shooting occurred in the assembly hall of Hyde Park High School.

Letter from Otto Emil Geppert to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Otto Emil Geppert expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and encloses a monetary contribution to Dr. King, in support of his nonviolent approach.

God's Existence

Dr. King cites Paul Tillich's perception of God's existence. This ideology is a Christological paradox for God "is being-itself" and beyond the essence of existence.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

The Negro Heritage Library

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter From Jane Hall to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Jane Hall writes Dr. King suggesting that there be a focus on equitable representation of the negro in television advertising in order to attain "maximum quality and quantity" of integration.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.