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Letter from Harry Denman to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Mr.Denman writes Dr. King to share words of support and encouragement as Dr. King prepares to turn himself over to the Birmingham officials. Denman suggests that Dr.King should turn this event into a major demonstration.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Wednesday, April 11, 1962

Wallace Terry extends his appreciation for Dr. King's visit to Washington, D. C. and sends best wishes from Jack Eisen to Mrs. King.

Letter from MLK to the SCLC Executive Staff

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Dr. King informs the SCLC's Executive Board of a special meeting that will take place at Beamon's Restaurant. Outlined are the staff members who are expected to be in attendance and the topics they will review.


Dr. King records a quote from Herbert Spencer’s “First Principles.”

Letter from Geo. Roosevelt Yancey to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Rev. Yancey invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker at the Golden Anniversary of Gethsemane Baptist Church. Rev. Yancey expresses regret that Dr. King had been unable to accept a previous invitation because of the inauguration of President Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana.

Religion and Peace of Soul

Dr. King cites a quotation from Jesus Christ that discusses peace, the "chief legacy" of religion. Dr. King explains that inner peace is maintained regardless of the external adversity one endures in life. Dr. King continues to elaborate on the necessary functional relationship one must have with God. He further describes the association between good, evil, innocence and more.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

Dr. King expresses his approval of an executive order outlawing discrimination in federally assisted housing. He states that this is a courageous action that is a giant leap towards freedom and democracy.

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Daily News: NAACP Anti-South Propaganda Article

Thursday, March 5, 1959

The author writes about a secret meeting that was held at the NAACP's headquarters regarding race identification.

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Letter from James O'Malley to MLK

Father James O'Malley of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Chicago asks Dr. King to withdraw from the Chicago Lawn area. He is concerned about the potential response to integration of the Lithuanians and Poles who live in the neighborhood.

Letter to Senator Robert Kennedy from MLK

Wednesday, March 2, 1966

Dr. King applauds Senator Robert Kennedy for his statement on Vietnam. Both Robert Kennedy and former President John F.Kennedy contributed to the overall political philosophy and concept of a world of diversity. In addition, Dr. King mentions several political entities of progression due to the intellect and partnership with Senator Kennedy.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, April 7, 1964

Mr. Randolph addresses his concerns with current events that could potentially harm the Civil Rights Movement. His list of developments includes Malcolm X's promotion of rifle clubs, the use of propaganda tactics to separate white people from the Civil Rights Movement, the increasing totalitarian influence on protest groups in northern cities and demagogic leadership that creates confusion and frustration. Mr. Randolph requests a meeting to discuss how to address these issues.

Letter from MLK to Gleason Jackson Regarding Negro National Flag

Thursday, July 13, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Jackson for designing a flag promoting unity among black people. Although Dr. Kings feels a flag such as this has implications of separatism, he encourages Mr. Jackson to continue publicizing his ideas regarding black unity.

Operation Breadbasket

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Operation Breadbasket outlines the results of negotiations between them and the Coca-Cola Bottling Company located in Chicago, Illinois. The negotiations brought about the opening of thirty-nine positions in the company that will be filled by Negro employees.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Tom Offenburger and Stan Levison plan to do a story on the Cleveland project and justify the expenses involved as necessary in the process of field research.

Letter of Invitation from Elroy C. Sandquist Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, July 19, 1966

In this letter, Mr. Sandquist writes to invite Dr. King to make an address at a luncheon for the City Club of Chicago.

Letter from David Pope to MLK

Sunday, November 6, 1966

David Pope extends an invitation for Dr. King to come to Australia. Pope continues to state his solidarity for the Civil Rights Movement in the United States and speaks to the international commonalities of social justice issues.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Telegram from MLK to Clarence T. Lundquist

Thursday, March 15, 1962

Dr. King writes Clarence Lundquist of the Wage, Hour and Public Contracts Division of the Department of Labor to request an investigation into complaints of wage discrimination at the Sea Pak Shrimp factories in Elonia and St. Simon's Island, Georgia.

Proposal: Pilgrimage to Rome

The Pilgrimage to Rome proposal addresses peace issues for an audience with Pope John. The proposal elaborates on the different aspects of the pilgrimage including political approaches, the involvement of women, arrangements, meetings and more. The proposal also entails excerpts from the first responses to the pilgrimage.

Letter to S. R. Wise from MLK Regarding Anti-Semitism

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dr. King responds to a telegram inquiry about SCLC and anti-semitism. Dr. King continues on at length about Negro-Jewish relations, excerpting from his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Food and Population Crisis Committee

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Dr. David Lubbock and Dr. Jo Alter describe the economic conditions in New Delhi, India. The document lists the operations, communications, medical assistance, food and other things needed to provide relief to the population involved in the crisis.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.