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"Washington, D.C"

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Letter from MLK to J. Howard Edmondson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Oklahoma Senator James Howard Edmondson to express appreciation for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from San Francisco Vietnam Committee to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

The San Francisco Vietnam Committee invites Dr. King to speak for their anti-Vietnam War rally. Dr. King would begin making statements against the Vietnam War during the fall of 1965.

Letter from Rhoda Dorsey to MLK

Thursday, May 21, 1964

Rhoda Dorsey, Dean and Associate Professor of History at Goucher College, informs Dr. King that they have included "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" on the freshman class reading list.

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

Robert Hilborn, President of The Empire Club of Canada invites Dr. King to be honored as the guest speaker. Hillborn offers the option of two different dates.

Telegram from Bill Barrett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Bill Barrett sends this telegram to Dr. King notifying him of his support of the Committee Bill.

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

Excerpt from The Drum Major Instinct

This passage quotes one of Dr. King's acclaimed sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia. He defines the desire to lead as "the Drum Major instinct." Seeing himself as a Drum Major for justice, peace, and righteousness, Dr. King posits what should be said at his funeral.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King details royalty checks disbursed from the sale of "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter of Inquiry from Carol Hess to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968

In this letter Carol Hess of New York requests an audience with Dr. King. She is writing a paper pertaining to the Birmingham March.

Letter from MLK to Reverend George W. Goth

Sunday, October 27, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend George Goth of Metropolitan United Church declining his invitation to make an appearance at his church. Dr. King has engagements for the remainder of the year that hinder him from committing to any further appearances.

Letter from Claudette Holston to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Claudette Holston writes Dr. King expressing the plight she has faced as a black woman in Michigan and Georgia. She asks Dr. King, "how would you feel if I was your daughter or wife?" and strongly urges him to write back.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the German edition of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", published by Econ Verlag, for the period 1/1/65 to 12/31/65.

Customer's Reciept from MLK to Morehouse College

This document is a customer's receipt from Dr. Martin L. King Jr. to Morehouse College.

MLK Handwritten Draft Letter

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the letter he received providing insights to an unknown problem.

Knudson, Albert C.

Dr. King cites a work by Christian theologian, Albert Knudson.

Judgement or Justice

Dr. King quotes a book entitled "Sea Dreams," by Alfred Lord Tennyson, regarding judgement and justice.

Mystery

Dr. King records a quote on mystery from Robert Flint's "The Philosophy of History."

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

Meet the Press Interview

Sunday, August 13, 1967

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Negro Population

This document compares the number of Negro registered voters and the potential number of registered Negro voters to the Negro population in the Southern United States.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding an Outstanding Balance

Wednesday, January 23, 1963

Mr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King of the new student dormitory and inquires about a donation to pay for the cost to furnish one room.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Sunday, November 29, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, includes a summary of several foreign contracts drawn on Dr. King's behalf for three of his books.

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding Commissioner of Commerce

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

In this telegram, Dr. King is informed that his telegram to Katherine C. Peden, Commisioner of Commerce State Office is undelivered.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Vincent

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude, to Mrs. Vincent and the Millinery Workers Union, for their support and hard work towards the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Baruch Treiger

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Dr. King thanks the National Women's League for its continued financial support of the SCLC.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.