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"Washington, D.C"

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), North Carolina (NC), INDIA, London, England

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

Letter to MLK Regarding Swedish Record Sales

Monday, April 25, 1966
SWEDEN

Chris Folcker follows up with Dr. King regarding sales figures and payments related to the sale of a recording in Sweden.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

The Chicago Freedom Movement: MLK Address

Friday, December 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

In this statement, Dr. King speaks on behalf of the Chicago Freedom Movement. Dr. King provides details concerning the overall mission, leadership and the predicated involvement of community organizations and participants.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY)

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

Evil

Dr. King references the concept of evil.

Bible

Dr. King quotes John Ruskin and Thomas Carlyle on the significance of the Bible.

Letter to Dr. Neil V. Sullivan from Robert L. Green

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Michigan (MI), Berkeley, CA

Robert Green expresses his appreciation for Dr. Neil Sullivan's chapter contribution in the book, "Education and the Urban Poor." Mr. Green is pleased when he discovers Dr. Sullivan has contributed a portion of the book profits to Dr. King and the SCLC. The book will be in demand for college level courses focusing on education, psychology and sociology.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960
New York, NY, NIGERIA, SOUTH AFRICA, LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA, INDIA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Letter from Dr. Neil V. Sullivan to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Berkeley, CA

Dr. Neil Sullivan requests that Dr. King write the foreword for his new book, "Set Our Children Free -- In Integrated Schools."

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Letter from Leonard Zion to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965
Massachusetts (MA)

Leonard Zion writes Dr. King stating that SCOPE (Summer Community Organization and Political Action) is organizing students and faculty at Brandeis University in Massachusetts to raise $40,000 to support him. The SCOPE project was run under the auspices of the Atlanta-based SCLC.

Letter from MLK to The Boston Globe

Friday, February 24, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King expresses gratitude to The Boston Globe for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Harry Wachtel gives Dr. King a monetary birthday gift that he tells Dr. King to use on a much needed vacation.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Rhodesia

Thursday, November 11, 1965
Washington, D.C., South Africa

Dr. King urges President Johnson to respond to the unilateral declaration of independence by Prime Minister Ian Smith of Rhodesia by withdrawing American officials, refusing diplomatic recognition and severing economic ties.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to Ms. Young's previous letter that discussed the difficulty of engaging people in voter registration efforts.

Telegram from the SCLC to Rev. John Golden

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Staff from the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program telegram Reverend John Golden informing him that all expenses will be paid for the trip to Georgia.

Letter from Mrs. E. A. Johnson to Mrs. Cotton

Saturday, March 31, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

A young male civil rights activist and participant in demonstrations experienced police brutality after he was targeted for his involvement in the Monroe Race Riot story. E. A. Johnson provides Mrs. Cotton with the legal details of the case surrounding the young man.

Man (sinfulness)

Dr. King explains the sinfulness of man with a quote from the book of Psalms.

Letter from Viva Sloan to MLK

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Viva O'Dean Sloan commends Dr. King on his efforts, but calls on his support to promote denominational integration of religions.

Evil

Dr. King outlines Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus' insights on the question of evil.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951
CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

The United States and Eastern Asia: The Report of a Conference of Asian Scholars

Thursday, December 28, 1967
JAPAN, CHINA, INDONESIA, MALAYSIA, VIETNAM, SINGAPORE, THAILAND, New York (NY)

Harry D. Gideonse, President of Freedom House, sends Dr. King two reports concerning international relations between the United States and Asia. The first of the two is a report on the international policies that have been implemented between Western nations and the countries of Asia. The second is a report that tracks the progress of freedom throughout those regions.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), HUNGARY

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, KENYA

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964
New York (NY)

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Correspondence: Letter to Dr.King from Miss Marelda G. Fontenot (Jan. 8, 1965)

Thursday, January 7, 1965
Louisiana (LA)

In this letter Marelda Fontenot encloses a copy of the school paper, "The Paraclete." The paper features an article about Dr. King receiving the Nobel Peace Price. She offers her sincere gratitude and admiration for Dr. King and his accomplishments.