Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Washington, D.C."

Telegram from Beryl Sacks to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 14, 1967

Ms. Beryl Sacks inquires about the availability of Dr. King to speak for the Speakers Bureau Adult Education Council.

Letter from MLK to Aubrey T. Edwards

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Dr. King regretfully informs Aubrey Edwards that his schedule will not allow him to visit Canada.

Letter from the Committee To Secure Justice for Morton Sobell to MLK

Tuesday, April 10, 1962

Helen Sobell, wife of Morton Sobell and co-chair of the committee trying to free him, requests that Dr. King write a letter supporting the approval of his parole. She includes an attachment explaining the parole process and contact information for the US Board of Parole.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Martin Fischer at the Theological Seminary of Berlin

Monday, September 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Fischer and the faculty at the Theological Seminary of Berlin for awarding him with an honorary degree. He expresses that the honor gives him courage to strive on and wishes them multiple blessings from God.

The American Jewish Committee Press Release

This press release covers statements made by Morris B. Abram, President of the American Jewish Committee. At the start of Rosh Hashonah, Abrams stated that the deterioration of the cities should be seen as a top priority for the federal government. He also states that the committee will continue to fight for the protection of civil and religious rights of Jews, particularly in the Middle East and Soviet Russia, the improvement of race relations, and global peace.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

Harry Belafonte Concert Promotion

Monday, May 28, 1962

The Belafonte Concert Committee reaches out to Atlanta music lovers for a show featuring Harry Belafonte and Miriam Makeba.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Szolyvai

Sunday, July 26, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Szolyvai's request for a meeting with Dr. King. She informs him that Dr. King is unsure of the next time he will be in New York, however she says they will keep his letter in mind.

SCLC Resolution "To Fulfill These Rights"

Thursday, June 2, 1966

The SCLC releases a copy of the resolution, "To Fulfill These Rights," created by the SCLC's Alabama staff and sent to the White House Conference. Hosea Williams states in the resolution that Negroes who voted in the primary were intimidated by white segregationist to not vote in the run-off.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Tuesday, March 31, 1964

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

Plowshare Pledge from Sargent Shriver

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This Plowshare Pledge, signed by Sargent Shriver, vows to use voting powers to have the savings of the military expenses invested in domestic human resources.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Bogalusa

Antoinette McNally retells the story of a Negro man who was brutally murdered for the alleged rape of a white woman. McNally shares that the story has been kept silenced for forty-six years.

Letter from Clayton Yates to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Clayton R. Yates informs Dr. King of the Kappa Boule Meeting held on Morehouse College campus with James P. Brawley and Benjamin E. Mays.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Program for Annual Meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference

This document is a brief agenda for the September 1962 Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Vincent

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude, to Mrs. Vincent and the Millinery Workers Union, for their support and hard work towards the SCLC.

Letter to MLK from G. Houghton

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Mr. Houghton writes to Dr. King with a plan for SABON (Saving and Building Organization of, by, and for the Negroes).

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding The Critic in Chicago

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the only magazine commitment to-date with The Critic in Chicago.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Freedom

Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

Letter from MLK to E. Weidner

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King informs Mrs. E. Weidner that Negroes have enjoyed positions of respect and prestige in non-Negro nations. He cites several examples in history to this statement.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

Telegram from Jacob K. Javits to MLK

Amidst the confusion of varying interpretations, Senator Jacob K. Javits asks Dr. King to share his interpretation of the term "black power," so that it can serve as a guide to others.

150 Religious Leaders March on OEO

Friday, October 14, 1966

This press release addresses Sargent Shrivers' decision not to refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi and to express concerns regarding the National War on Poverty.