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Sin

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 9:17, a passage from the Bible concerning sin.

Letter from Rev. Theodore L. Fischer to MLK

Wednesday, June 23, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Rev. Theodore Fischer of the Comittee on Religion and Race of the Eastern Pennsylvania Synod offers support to end discrimination in housing.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK 7/25/1967

Tuesday, July 25, 1967
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row Publishers, drafted this correspondence to Dr. King. Mr. Canfield was delighted to inform Dr. King of the impressive sales of his last book. He acknowledged that reorders for Dr. King's book came to an amazing $1,020, the best in comparison to bestsellers and wholesale stores. The book being referred to, in this document, would be Dr. King's most prophetic, entitled, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 1, 1967
New York (NY)

In this reprint of an article originally printed in the fall of 1965, Professor Robert S. Browne makes a charge to the Department of Defense that the Negro troops were being used in Vietnam in disproportionate numbers. Freedomsways publications re-released the publication due to its remarkably fresh and informative content and high demand.

Letter to MLK from Stanley Rice

Thursday, September 21, 1967
Boston, MA

In this letter, Vice President Stanley Rice writes to Dr. King thanking him for subscribing to the United Business Service.

Temple Sholom Bulletin

Saturday, September 19, 1964
Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Wisconsin (WI), Los Angeles, CA, Cincinnati, OH, PUERTO RICO

This issue of the Temple Shalom Bulletin highlights Dr. King and his accomplishments during the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from A. T. Gabriel to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963
San Francisco, CA, Birmingham, AL

A. T. Gabriel writes Dr. King enclosing monetary contributions from the Local Union and the Birmingham Committee for Civil Rights of Local 110. Gabriel asks that Dr. King acknowledge the contributions with a letter explaining the progress of his work.

Letter from Harold W. Buchholz to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Harold W. Buchholz, a financial patron, provides Dr. King with tips to appeal to more Americans regarding his programs to provide equality for Negroes.

The Negro

Atlanta, GA

This poem describes the strength and perseverance of the Negro during difficult times.

Letter from Soma Ragir to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), New Jersey (NJ), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Soma Ragir extends her support for Dr. King's planned Poor People's March on Washington, but expresses her desire for heightened political organization in order to elect black congressional members who can ultimately "reform our social system."

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

Letter of Response from Clarence B. Jones to J. Saba Alexander

Wednesday, April 17, 1968
New York, NY, Brooklyn, NY

Clarence Jones responds to Alexander's letter requesting action steps to create an interfaith chapel and memorial library in honor of Dr. King. Jones agrees with the great loss and likewise pledges to continue the work.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963
New York (NY)

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Robert Flint’s “The Philosophy of History.”

A Resolution Directed to the African Methodist Episopal Church

Ohio (OH), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Florida (FL), Cleveland, OH

This resolution endorses the appointment of Donald Jacobs as Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Friday, June 26, 1964
Ohio (OH)

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Letter from Henry Lee Gibson to MLK

Detroit, MI

Henry J. Gibson is aware of Dr. King's understanding of "God" and spirituality. Subsequent to a recent surgery, Mr. Gibson is now conscious of the meaning of being "born again." Praying enhanced his knowledge of God's presence in the human race which brought clarity for his perception of the "yellow man." Mr. Gibson requests to meet with Dr. King to further discuss his recent spiritual experiences and newly found wisdom.

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967
VIETNAM

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.

Telegram from Margit Vinberg to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Margit Vinberg invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be the guests of honor at a luncheon in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the Joint Swedish Press Publicistklubben.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

GERMANY

In this column, Dr. King speaks of the outbreak of "Nazi-like degeneracy" less than 15 years after the Holocaust. He says that in spite of these evils, it should not discourage us from coming together as human beings, living in harmony and not letting the dangers of racism paralyze us as a world community.

MLK's Speech on Civil Rights and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks about his role as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and his position on the Vietnam War.

Trent, Canons and Decrees of the Council of

ITALY

Dr. King records some thoughts on the Decrees of the Council of Trent regarding the Catholic Church's response to the Protestant Reformation.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

This letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton request the Leeds & Northrup Foundation provide a grant to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Chauncey Eskridge includes a tax exempt letter and a copy of the trust instrument outlining the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Both Dr. King and Mr. Bernard Jackson received a copy of this letter.

Letter from Illinois High School Student Beth Allen to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

High school student Beth Allen writes Dr. King inquiring about how she can contribute to the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Information about Poor People's Campaign

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Letter Requesting a Meeting, to MLK from Harper & Brothers

Wednesday, November 7, 1962
New York, NY

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, referenced that he received notice that Dr. King would be preaching at Riverside Church, in New York City. Mr. Arnold asked whether or not Dr. King would be available for a meal, after his sermon at Riverside. He also thanked him for the additional sermons that had been received, for the preparation of Dr. King's second book.

The Student Protest Movement Special Report

Thursday, February 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA, Tennessee (TN), Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Regional Council outlines several facts regarding the Student Protest Movement leading up to February 25, 1960. The contents of this report include detailed examples, legal precedents and public reaction accounts. Also included, is an analysis of the conditions that caused the student protest movement, as well as ideas for solutions.

Letter from Mr. Levison Regarding U.S. Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Monday, September 19, 1966

Mr. Levison expresses his support for Representative Powell during the controversial House of Representatives committee chairmanship and ethical dilemma. Levison goes on to defend the suggestion of race being the determining factor of his criticism by volunteering his support of any review of congressional systems.

Telegram from Abraham Heschel to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Alabama (AL)

Abraham Heschel tells Dr. King that he has a deep identification with the goals that Dr. King is dedicated to and offers him encouragement.

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Mississippi (MS), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."