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Newspaper Article about Refresher Training and Employment for Teachers Displaced by Integration

Washington, D.C.

This newspaper article frames the dilemma of teachers displaced by integration. Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz urged state employment agencies to make a maximum effort to provide employment assistance and refresher training opportunities for these teachers.

Letter from the Holy Name College to MLK

Friday, October 11, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

The Holy Name College requests Dr. King's written contribution for a new section in their publication entitled Interest Magazine. Interest Magazine is an international publication dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of theology. Dr. King has been selected to focus on the issue regarding Christianity and the American Negro. The college provides Dr. King with the restrictions of his essay and assures him that they will print his written work without editing for authenticity.

Social Ethics

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 3:15 while taking notes about social ethics. The passage that he quotes says that those who oppress others are sinning against God.

The Modern Negro Activist

Montgomery, AL, GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Alabama (AL), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Letter to Dr. Neil V. Sullivan from Robert L. Green

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Michigan (MI), Berkeley, CA

Robert Green expresses his appreciation for Dr. Neil Sullivan's chapter contribution in the book, "Education and the Urban Poor." Mr. Green is pleased when he discovers Dr. Sullivan has contributed a portion of the book profits to Dr. King and the SCLC. The book will be in demand for college level courses focusing on education, psychology and sociology.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

Sunday, January 21, 1968
NIGERIA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, EGYPT

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

Letter from Ronald Kessebring to SCLC

Friday, March 30, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ronald Kessebring sends a contribution along with a letter of support to the SCLC. As a former resident of Atlanta, Mr. Kessebring witnessed what the organization provided for the community and the country at large.

Letter from Dr. King to Miss Norwell

In this doucment, Dr.King apologizes for his delayed response and expresses gratitude for the song Miss Norwell sent him.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, May 22, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the British Broadcasting Company wants to read extracts from "Strength to Love" in their "First Day of the Week" program.

Letter from The Very Rev. Raymond J. Swords to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964
New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA)

Fr. Raymond J. Swords, S.J., President of the College of the Holy Cross, writes to Dr. King, expressing how joyous he was to hear that King was selected as the 1964 Nobel Prize Winner.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), ALGERIA

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965
West Virginia (WV)

Dr. Edwin Hoffman invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum at West Virginia State College. Dr. Hoffman hopes Dr. King can take time from his very limited schedule to attend the college's convocation.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Letter from John Moorman to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
North Carolina (NC), Washington (WA)

John Moorman, President of the Student Christian Association at Guilford College, invites Dr. King to be the speaker for their Religious Emphasis Week in April of 1968. Moorman discusses details of the arrangement, including Dr. King's honorarium and travel expenses.

Letter From Mattie M. Patterson to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mattie Patterson congratulates Dr. King on the two awards he has recently received.

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Letter from MLK to William Ericson

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
New York (NY)

In this letter, Dr. King states his appreciation for the contribution made by Mr. Ericson to the SCLC Foundation. Dr. King goes on to express how grateful he is to have such support in the promotion of social change through non-violence.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Wayne C. Hess

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Rev. Hess and the participants in the Illinois Conference Evangelical United Brethren Church for their contribution to the SCLC.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

Letter from Moisa Bulboaca to MLK

Tuesday, December 14, 1965
Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, ROMANIA, HUNGARY, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, New York (NY), New York, NY

Moisa Bulboaca thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence in which Dr. King expressed his interest in visiting and preaching in Romania. In the event Dr. King actually formulates a trip, Bulboaca suggests accompanying if possible. The author explains their background in "sacred music" and provides a brief biography for consideration. They offer to organize a musical selection to fit Dr. King's sermons.

Support Letter from

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Donna Breiter conveys her support of Dr. King's work within the Civil Rights Movement. Due to her finances she cannot physically attend marches, but she inquirers of other ways to support the efforts.

Telegram from Mike Bibler to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Mike Bibler contends that "our lame duck president" can "do more for black people than any other man in history." This telegram was sent following President Johnson's announcement that he would not seek re-election.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

Indiana (IN)

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

Letter from Hunn Guelde to MLK

Saturday, October 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Hunn Guelde inquires about a claim made by the FBI in regards to Dr. King.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964
New York (NY), HUNGARY

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy Regarding MLK Memorial Service

Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Dr. Abernathy receives this letter from an anonymous sender suggesting that the SCLC plan a memorial service in commemoration of Dr. King on Emancipation Day. The writer provides a list of music and poems that would be appropriate for the occasion.

Letter from J.Campe to MLK regarding Book Royalties

Friday, May 19, 1967
New York, NY

This financial document references earnings from the Japanese editions of Dr. King's books, "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."