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"West Virginia (WV)"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise

Friday, October 4, 1963

Dora McDonald writes to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise to inform them of a transfer of funds to the intended recipient.

Letter from Mrs. Thomas Walsh to Dr. Roy Enquist

Monday, June 5, 1967

Mrs. Thomas Walsh writes to Dr. Roy J. Enquist regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at St. Mary's University, St. Edward's University and the Texas Lutheran College.

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Senator Leroy Johnson

Thursday, October 10, 1963

Milton A. Reid, a candidate for State Senate, invites Georgia Senator Leroy Johnson to a banquet at Virginia State College. The event will benefit the campaign expenses and feature guest speaker Wyatt Tee Walker, Dr. King's assistant.

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Wednesday, August 17, 1966

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter writes Dr. King concerning the state in which Negroes live. The author feels as if Dr. King only addresses the faults of the white race instead of those of his own race.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Jainism

Dr. King notes a quote regarding the philosophy of Jainism.

Letter from Dean Florio to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Dean Florio sends condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Robert Way to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Robert Way, Chairman of the Hadley Executive Committee, writes to correct a misunderstanding regarding restrictions on the contents of a lecture Dr. King is scheduled to deliver. Mr. Way assures Dr. King he has the freedom to express what he feels is important.

Letter from Warren Hamilton to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Warren Hamilton, president of the Student Government Association of the Tuskegee Institute, invites Dr. King to participate in their upcoming lecture series entitled "Viewpoint '68."

Letter from Wiley Bell to MLK

Friday, June 28, 1963

Inspired by Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail," Wiley Bell thanks Dr. King for the "heart warming and heart rending article." Bell tells Dr. King that his letter has inspired his studies as a fellow clergyman.

Letter from MLK to a Donor

Dr. King expresses gratitude for a contribution received by The Montgomery Improvement Association.

Letter from Fred S. Bertsch Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965

Fred Bertsch Jr., Principal of the Holland School in Michigan, informs Dr. King that the school has made other arrangements for its commencement ceremony.

Telegram from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

A. Phillip Randolph, on behalf of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and the Negro American Labor Council, expresses joy at Dr. King's release from prison.

Letter from Roger Threats to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Roger Threats, a student from New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King death. In the letter, Threats describes his own dream, which is an end to fighting.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Thursday, June 30, 1966

This royalty statement from Harper and Row, Publishers Incorporated, details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" for the six month period ending June 30, 1966.

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Sunday, July 22, 1962

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

God: Hosea

Dr. King explores God as it relates to the book of Hosea.

Memorandum from James Framer to CORE Group Leaders

Monday, September 25, 1961

Jamer Framer, National Director of CORE, outlines several examples of legal and "extra-legal" harrassment of CORE and Freedom Riders by Mississippi officials.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965

Bent Ostergaard, a member of Amnesty International, informs Dr. King that his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize served as a great pleasure for the Danish people. The Danish section of Amnesty International requests Dr. King's appearance during his travel to Europe. Mr. Ostergaard notifies Dr. King that his expenses will be covered and they would like to give him a tour of the public institutions in Denmark.

Election of MLK to the Morehouse College Board of Trustees

Friday, January 22, 1965

Charles Merrill and Benjamin E. Mays inform the Morehouse College Board of Trustees of Dr. King's consideration for a seat on the Board to replace Dr. Colwell. This consideration is pending if this election does not cause Judge Elbert P. Tuttle to resign his seat on the Board or disqualify himself as an officer of the U. S. Court of Appeal of the Fifth Circuit.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares notes for the sermon "Three Levels of Fellowship" deriving from 1st Corinthians 1:2, 9.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

Our God is Able

In this chapter from "Strength to Love,"Dr. King proclaims that God is able to do anything. He asserts that while man's intellect and natural disasters may cause us to question God, He is omnipotent.

Suggestions for Survival During Period of Prolonged Civil Disorder

This document contains a list of tips and suggested supplies for survival during a period of civil disorder, including specific food items and tools. The document recommends stockpiling enough supplies to survive for at least one month without needing to leave your home.

Oberlin College Commencement

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

Transformed Nonconformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King discusses the importance of not conforming in a sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the hardships and the benefits that come with being a transformed non-conformist.