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"West Virginia (WV)"

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Tharon Stevens

Dr. King responds to Mr. Stevens' previous letter and commends his courageous efforts for implementing the 1964 Civil Rights Act in Statesboro. An application to develop an SCLC affiliate in Statesboro is also enclosed.

Letter from P.B. Boorsma to MLK

Friday, August 6, 1965

The president of the Students Almanac Committee of the Free University of Amsterdam is requesting a biographical sketch of Dr. King to feature in their 1965 edition. The committee is featuring Dr. King because he will soon be awarded the "doctor's degree of honour" at the Free University of Amsterdam.

Telegram from MLK to President Eisenhower

Thursday, August 13, 1959

This is the text of a telegram Dr. King sent to President Eisenhower regarding the contemporaneous events of the opening of desegregated schools and the arrival of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Senator Kenneth B. Keating responds to Dr. King's previous message by providing him with a copy of a statement he delivered before the Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill.

March 1968 Dr. Marin Luther King Jr. drafts a letter of gratitude for Richard Gardner.

Sunday, March 24, 1968

Dr. King drafted a letter of gratitudefor Richard Gardner. Mr. Gardner contibuted a donation of one hundred dollars to the SCLC. Dr. King also, outlines some of the programs in which the SCLC engages in as well as it's principles of non-violence.

Letter from MLK to Katharine Hightower

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at a community event hosted by the Saint James African Methodist Episcopal Church.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Telegram from Richard Daley to Dr. King

Richard Daley is requesting Dr. King's presence at the Mayor's office to discuss ways of improving the education, employment, health, and living conditions to help the youth in the city of Chicago. Department Heads will be present at the meeting to answer questions and discuss recommendations that aid the city in achieving their goals.

William James

Dr. King briefly discusses philosopher William James and his lectures entitled "The Variety of Religious Experience."

Letter from Charles E. Blackburn to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

Charles Blackburn shares with Dr. King a mutual passion for change. Blackburn expresses that his concern is not with the "American Negroe's revolt against hypocrisy," but with the hypocrisy as it applies to the young white generation.

SCLC Northern City Tour

SCLC provides an organizational manual that outlines details regarding their Northern city tour. They are traveling to cities in the northern United States in order to assess social conditions and build relationships amongst civil rights leadership. The manual also provides tour dates and suggestions for organizing the tour.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Joan Daves references a potential book idea similar to that of "The Wisdom of John F. Kennedy." This production would include various speeches and writings of Dr. King. Factoring in pros and cons to the selection of publishers, Ms. Daves provides his insight concerning the process.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

Letter from Murillo Millin to SCLC

Friday, April 20, 1962

Murillo Millin, President of the Van Buren Block Association, Inc., makes a contribution to the SCLC.

Appeal to the President of the United States

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

School of Youth for Social Service

The School of Youth for Social Service in South Vietnam aided in immediate war relief, as well as a long range of programs such as rural health & sanitation, agriculture, and illiteracy.

Advertising and Promotion Expenditures

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

This is a copy of the advertising and promotion expenditures for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love".

Letter from M.W. Espy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

This letter is requesting that Dr. King sign the First Day Cover of the twenty cent postage stamp honoring Gen. George C. Marshall. It is also noted that two other Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed the Cover as well.

Letter form Pedro A. Otero Fernandez & Dora E. Cartagen to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

The Rio Piedras' Lawyers Association of Puerto Rico congratulates Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. They express how they share Dr. King's same beliefs regarding the three great evils of mankind and hope to spread the movement under his leadership throughout the world.

How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil." In this sermon, King asserts that in many instances the facts of life contradicts a believer's faith, and poses reasons why one should hold firm to their faith.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and expresses her love for him.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Letter from William Eerdmans, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1963

William. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company requests to reprint Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" in a small booklet for wider circulation. Eerdmans, Jr. writes, "your words...are those of a Christian martyr and saint."

Letter from Samuel Abbott to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Samuel Abbott asks Dr. King for a personal favor in writing the preface for his recent publication.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Letter from MLK to Quentin N. Burdick

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Quentin Burdick, a United States Senator from North Dakota, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Don DuMont to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965

Mr. DuMont expresses his disapproval of Dr. King's leadership of the negro race and the association of the movement with Christianity, because he seeks proof that Dr. King's movement is not "Communist-inspired." Dumont was an evangelist who ran unsuccessfully for a variety of political offices.