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"West Virginia (WV)"

Correspondence: Telgegram from W.A. Flowers to Dr.King

Friday, September 9, 1966

This telegram from W.A. Flowers is offering words of support and encouragement to Dr. King and the movement. Flower discourages the behavior leaders, such as Stokley Carmichael and hopes Dr. King stands firm to his conviction to better all man kind.

Letter from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK

Tuesday, October 23, 1962

Dow Kirkpatrick, Pastor of First Methodist Church in Evanston, Illinois, invites Dr. King to dinner during his visit to Evanston.

MLK Address at Dinner Honoring Jackie Robinson

Friday, July 20, 1962

This is the transcript of Dr. King's address at the 1962 Hall of Fame Dinner honoring Jackie Robinson in New York City. Dr. King praises Robinson for standing up for civil rights as the first Negro to break Major League Baseball's color barrier.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

Thursday, September 27, 1962

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse

This pamphlet is from Dr. King's undergraduate alma mater, Morehouse College. The President of the institute, Benjamin E. Mays, is the author of , "A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse" which outlines the progress made during his presidency.

Man The Christian View

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr’s three ways in which the Christian view of man differs from all others, citing “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Letter from Gunnar Jahn

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Gynnar Jahn organizes a delegation of Nobel Peace Prize winners who will have a discussion about the Vietnam War.

People In Action: A Profound Moral..Continued

Saturday, August 3, 1963

Dr. King challenges the Negro church and its leadership to uphold the morals of the community. He insists that clergymen must speak out guardedly to obtain support.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from Donald W. Morgan to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Donald Morgan informs Dr. King that northern locations such as New England and Vermont experience racial issues. Mr. Morgan serves as the chairman of the program committee for the 1964 Annual Meeting of the Vermont Congregational Conference. Dr. King is extended an invitation to speak at this conference which is located at the Rutland Congregational Church.

Letter from M. A. Cross to Marie Goldner

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

M. A. Cross, Director of Public and Industrial Relations at Dan River Mills, Inc., informs Mrs. Goldner that Dan River Mills, Inc. does not discriminate against Negroes.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964

This letter from Ms. Daves to Dr. King features requests regarding his itinerary for his trip to England.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Green

Monday, January 22, 1968

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald tells Dr. Robert Green that Dr. King has approved Dr. Green's forward for the "Famous American Series."

Letter from Rita Machelle Foster to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Rita Machelle Foster, an eighth grade student a Harvard Elementary School, requests any information or documentation provided by Dr. King for her composition on Negro History Week. Ms. Foster asks that Dr. King provide a photograph and discuss the James Meredith situation.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

MLK Sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, January 16, 1966

As pastor of Ebenezer, Dr. King delivered this particular sermon to his congregation in January of 196. He begins by referencing representative-elect Julian Bond's statement against war and against America's involvement in Vietnam, and he commends Mr. Bond for being courageous enough to speak his mind. He uses quotes from historical figures and biblical passages to support his claim that humans should be men of conviction and not of conformity. Dr.

Letter from Dr. King's Secretary, Maude L. Ballou

In this standard response letter, Dr. King's personal secretary highlighted the progress made in his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem. It also notes that Dr. King would respond to his many "well wishes", once he had been cleared by his physicians.

Letter from Anonymous Writer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

The author of this letter copies an article "Communists Meet the Church," published by the San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle, to support his accusations of cooperation between the Catholic Church and Communists.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the universe.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Lamont

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

This document contains a small series of responses between Dr. King and Herbert Lamont. Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lamont's moral support, while Lamont affirms Dr. King's sentiments on peace and justice.

Letter from Robert Finley to President Johnson

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Robert Finley proposes a federal gasoline tax increase of at least fifty cents to relieve the burden of property owners. He enumerates the benefits that would be achieved.

Letter from Gunnar Fagerberg to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964

Dr. King is the recipient of this invitation to speak made by the students of the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from Silas Norman to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Silas Norman, State Project Director of the Alabama SNCC, writes Dr. King to inform him that they have not received a response from a past telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Lowndes County, Alabama.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Vernon W. Stone

Dr. King commends Dr. Vernon Stone on his superb teaching career and upcoming move to become the first Negro professor at a University in Atlanta.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Sermon Text (Habakkuk)

Dr. King examines Habakkuk chapter 1, verses 2 through 4 to discuss whether the inequalities of life are justification to question God.

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."