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Letter from Alice Glaser to MLK

Wednesday, June 26, 1963

Alice Glaser, Assistant Editor for Esquire Magazine, requests that Dr. King write an article entitled "A Day in a Southern Jail" regarding the actual details of his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Telegram from Oeberg Ruden Abrahamsson to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

The Baptist Union of Sweden congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. The group also invites Dr. King to Sweden.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

News from Highlander Folk School

Wednesday, December 2, 1959

Beginning on January 15th, the News from Highlander Folk school will open its adult educational program. In support of the program, many renowned leaders across Amercia signed the statement.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. Some of the topics discussed include the role of the SCLC, Operation Breadbasket and a voting bill.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Evil

Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Letter from Joe Augustine to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mr. Augustine claims that he is able to point directly to who is responsible for the wrong that is going on in the country, and would like to mail Dr. King more information to this effect.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

Letter from Bruce A. King to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Bruce King, Secretary of the Baptist Union of New South Wales, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Christmas Gift List of Mrs. King

This list entails those in receipt of a Christmas gift from Coretta Scott King.

Birthday Card to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Margaret, which includes a verse from the book of Matthew.

Civil Rights Movement Suggestions from MLK Supporter

This note to Dr. King outlines six suggestions to address inequality and aid with employment, education and civil rights reform.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Abram Eisenman expresses appreciation and admiration for Dr. King's work. Eisenman also
addresses the divide of supporters within the Civil Rights Movement concerning the Vietnam War.

God

Dr. King wrote these notes on the concept of God while reading "Science and the Modern World" and "Religion in the Making" by Alfred North Whitehead. He quotes Whitehead, stating that God is the "perpetual vision of the road which leads to the deeper realities."

Letter from Vivian S. Florence to MLK

Sunday, November 10, 1963

Ms. Florence informs Dr. King she has sent two other letters to the SCLC, both of which included contributions from the United Mine Workers of America. She expresses concern regarding mail tampering due to Dr. King's notoriety.

Newspaper Article about Refresher Training and Employment for Teachers Displaced by Integration

This newspaper article frames the dilemma of teachers displaced by integration. Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz urged state employment agencies to make a maximum effort to provide employment assistance and refresher training opportunities for these teachers.

Dr. King's Involvement with the Second Emancipation Proclamation

Saturday, March 24, 1962

This article states, Dr. King recently announced President Kennedy has request he submit for his signature a second Emancipation Proclamation.

"King's New Book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 23, 1967

This Argus newspaper clipping is a mini review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.

Remarks by MLK in Acceptance of the Spingarn Medal

Friday, June 28, 1957

In his acceptance speech for the Spingarn Medal, Dr. King remarks about the need for continuing the fight for social justice and equality around the world. He acknowledges the work of NAACP along with protesters as they continue to be on the frontline in addressing the nation's social ills.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable E.L. Bartlett

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Alaskan Congressman Edward Lewis Bartlett to express appreciation for his vote in support of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Telegram from Lawrence F. O'Brien to MLK

Thursday, August 5, 1965

Lawrence O'Brien, Special Assistant to President Johnson, invites Dr. King to the signing of the Voting Rights Act in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Nancy Claytor to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Nancy Claytor requests Dr. King's permission to use lines from "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" for the publication "The Methodist Student V-VI."

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, August 26, 1964

Dr. King is invited by A. Philip Randolph to attend a birthday party for well known Presbyterian minister, socialist and pacifist Norman Thomas. Randolph requests that Dr. King participate as a sponsor for Thomas' birthday celebration.

Letter from Melis Nicolaides to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965

Melis Nicolaides invites Dr. King to participate in the Third Marathon Peace March in Athens, Greece. At the first Peace March, only one person completed the march and that person was killed the following year. The next year "thousands of Greek people marched in the footsteps" of the murdered individual. Nicolaides explains that Dr. King's participation will be "an important contribution to the cause of peace."