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Letter from MLK to Rabbi Philip Hiat

Friday, February 8, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to Rabbi Hiat's suggestion to provide an "opportunity for dialogue between Jewish and Negro religious leadership." In addition to confirming his participation in the dialogue, Dr. King commits to sending an additional letter with the names of "men who have much to contribute" along with some potential subject headings for the agenda.

Letter from Ernest M. Bettenson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
UNITED KINGDOM, Atlanta, GA

Ernest M. Bettenson, the Registrar at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, writes Miss McDonald to solidify arrangements for Dr. King's visit to the University. The sender informs Miss McDonald that tradition mandates meal arrangements for the recipient of an honorary degree and outlines several options to assist Dr. King in accommodating this practice.

Atlanta Operation Breadbasket Bi-Annual Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Fred C. Bennette, Jr. issues the bi-annual report for the Atlanta Chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Bennette expounds on the mission of Dr. King and the SCLC to create economic opportunities through advances in employment.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 17, 1957
Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), RUSSIAN FEDERATION, GREECE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King interprets Jesus' command to "love your enemies" and outlines how to accomplish this goal. He closes this sermon by relating the philosophy of love to the use of nonviolence as a means to overcome oppression.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood, Inc. Program

Friday, June 4, 1965
Illinois (IL)

The Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood organized this program where Dr. King makes a special address.

Statement by MLK

Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King discusses the backlash received during the protests and demonstrations for civil rights. He asserts that nonviolence is the most successful weapon, and that in order to participate the individual must be bold, brave, and disciplined.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. V. E. Moray

Friday, April 14, 1967
INDIA, London, England

Joan Daves gives Dr. Moray permission to publish a Marathi edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Race Prejudice"

Here in this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on Race Prejudice and the "evil" it entails.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Adverse Letter about Adam Clayton Powell

An anonymous author asserts that Adam Clayton Powell is not a good leader and he "got in the limelight as he has done by filth."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Winfred P. Buckwalter III to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI), VIETNAM

Mr. and Mrs. Buckwater enclose a check for $500.00 that is intended to assist Dr. King in his efforts to stop the Vietnam conflict and help establish world peace.

Forgiveness

Dr. King writes on the topic of "forgiveness," as mentioned in Nehemiah 9:17.

MLK on the Death of Paul Tillich

Dr. King comments on the life and deeds of Paul Tillich, a German-American theologian and a major influence on the philosophies of Dr. King.

Letter from Al Hearin to MLK about Public Appearance

Monday, October 30, 1967
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

In this letter Al Hearin expresses his admiration for Dr. King and his character, but also expresses his concerns that he, Dr. King, is possibly being used by communist elements in society. Hearin also requests that Dr. King write him a handwritten letter about a life changing experience. Furthermore, Hearin requests an autographed picture.

Letter from Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine to MLK

Tuesday, February 18, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Time Magazine's Otto Fuerbringer informs Dora McDonald that Dr. King's picture is apart of a traveling Time cover exhibit. He pledges to forward copies of Dr. King's family portrait.

Customer's Reciept from MLK to Morehouse College

Atlanta, GA

This document is a customer's receipt from Dr. Martin L. King Jr. to Morehouse College.

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

Speech to National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, South Africa, CONGO / ZAIRE

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.

Letter from MLK to Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Arnold about a Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967
California (CA)

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Arnold for their financial contribution to the SCLC while also explaining why such contributions are important.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable Joseph S. Clark

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Senator Joseph S. Clark of Pennsylvania to commend his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr. Press Release

Thursday, March 3, 1960
Alabama (AL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

Bayard Rustin announces the formation of the Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr. The Committee was formed in response to charges against Dr. King being filed by Alabama. The Committee intends to raise $200,000 in support of Dr. King and the SCLC.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Patripassianism"

Dr. King outlines "Patripassianism" .This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

SCLC Mail Log: February 28, 1968

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This mail log exemplifies the large quantity of correspondence that the SCLC received daily, as well as the method that they devised to deal with it. The mail log for this day shows a variety of types of correspondence, including invitations, invoices, contributions, and personal letters from friends and colleagues.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

In this letter, Harry G. Boyte offers his personal admiration to Mrs. King for the "strength [she has] provided Dr. King."

The Free Southern Theater

New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA)

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, June 23, 1965
West Virginia (WV)

Dr. King writes Mrs. G. Coleman to acknowledge the receipt of her letter inviting him to speak at a Freedom Rally in Beckley, West Virginia. Dr. King expresses his deep regret in his inability to attend.

An Open Letter to Free Americans

Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

In response to Dr. King's assassination, the author urges "Free Americans" to join the fight against racism.