The Archive

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"Wisconsin (WI)"

Naturalism (Its Losing of the Individual)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Letter from Bret Harte Junior High School to MLK

Tuesday, October 3, 1967

The eighth grade class from Bret Harte Junior High School writes to Dr.King to inquire about his opinion on race relations. The students expressed that they believed that Negros deserve equal rights.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

"Where Do We Go From Here"-Invoice

Monday, May 22, 1967

This document contains a Harper & Row, Publishers invoice for the sale of four copies of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Alice Cooper to MLK

Sunday, February 18, 1968

Mrs. Cooper expresses agreement with Dr. King's article in the May 1967 edition of "The Progressive," which discussed the inherit injustice in using "black and white" as names for races. She also sends a copy of an article she wrote that suggests some alternate names.

Telegram from Stanley Levison to Coretta Scott King

Friday, January 17, 1969

Stanley Levison warns Mrs. King about interceding between governments.

Support Negro Businesses

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

From November 1966 newspaper ad: "Support Negro Business" advertisement from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter to Congressman Elect Adam C. Powell

This letter from constituent Robert Greene urges Adam C. Powell to reopen his case so that he may be cleared of any wrong doing. Greene states how important Powell is to the Black community and the State of New York. Greene provides information that may assist Powell with his case.

Postcard from Carl S. to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

The sender of this postcard informs Dr. King that he supports King's planned trips to Colorado and California.

Some Things We Can Do

In this series of note cards entitled "Some Things We Can Do," Dr. King provides several suggestions pertaining to the African American community.

Letter from Ted Bleecker to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

Ted Bleecker, Director of Publications for the United Federation of Teachers, extends gratitude to Dr. King for his statement in the Federation's 50th anniversary issue. Enclosed is a copy of the issue in which Dr. King congratulates the Federation, draws comparisons between the attitudes of the Federation and the Civil Rights Movement, and thanks them for receipt of the John Dewey Award.

Letter from Vera M. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Inspired by an article in the Saturday Evening Post, Vera Jones congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Monday, December 30, 1963

The Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg invites Dr. King to speak at meeting that will be held at the Pennsylvania State Educational Building. Martin Morand, Vice-President of the Council, also includes information about the issues in Harrisburg's black community to show why Dr. King should accept the invitation.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Edna R. McKinnon

Wednesday, December 20, 1967

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Edna McKinnon expressing deep appreciation for her generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He continues to say that the work of the organization is strengthened by such support.

Letter from Henrietta Buckmaster to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Henrietta Buckmaster expresses her admiration for Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Erica Smith to MLK

Monday, August 20, 1962

Erica Smith writes Dr. King to express her dismay for the people who are against the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Smith is in full support of Dr. King's fight for social justice and prays for his continuing journey.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

This document is a memo updating Dr. King of requests, invitations and current SCLC finances.

Pilgrimage to Nonviolence

Dr. King's essay "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" provides a replete account of the thinkers, ideas and sentiments responsible for his pledge to nonviolence.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, April 16, 1963

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rosa A. King

Thursday, July 12, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Rosa King that Dr. King will be unable to speak at Central Baptist Church.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Letter from A. White to MLK

A. White reprimands the public use of fire hydrants and urges Dr. King to educate his "people" to avoid such actions.

Letter from the American Committee on Africa Regarding South Africa's Participation in the Olympics

Thursday, January 11, 1968

George M. Houser, Executive Director of the American Committee on Africa, informs readers of the International Olympic Committee's upcoming meeting that will discuss the 1968 Olympics. Mr. Houser encloses a paper regarding the history of South Africa and the Olympics to help urge the committee to reconsider granting South Africa permission to participate in the Olympics.

Letter from William Caspe and Bruce Fleegler to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963

William Caspe and Bruce Fleeger, representatives of the Northern Student Movement at Brandies University, inform Dr. King of their past civil rights efforts with Negroes in the south and their upcoming "Fast for Freedom" event. They request Dr. King's written endorsement of the program and ask that he encourage others to participate.

Crisis In the Nation

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.