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Letter from Dora McDonald to Dolly Davis

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dolly Davis that Dr. King is absent from the city and they're looking forward to receiving the galleys to "the New World of Negro Americans" by Harold Isaacs.

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Letter from Macedonia Church to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Members of Macedonia Church seek advice and help from Dr. King in regards to continuing Sunday worship service.

SCLC Fall Conference Agenda

Friday, September 30, 1960

This is a tentative program for the SCLC's General Fall Conference to be held October 11th through the 13th in 1960. The program included such keynote speakers as Kelley Miller Smith, Joseph E. Lowery, and a freedom rally led by Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and Fred Shuttlesworth.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from Henry Duerksen to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Duerksen sends a brief letter showing his support and pride for Dr. King's work and dismissing negative statements toward Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to George E. Bass

Thursday, April 7, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Luncheon for the Planned Parenthood Association.

Letter From Octavia Wynbush Strong to MLK

Saturday, February 13, 1965

Mrs. Strong offers Dr. King a copy of her play "Listen, America," with hopes that he might use it in his "wonderful work."

Post Card Front from Alice and Jun Hayakawa to Coretta King

The Hayakawa family send this photo greeting to Mrs. King, addressing her as "Corrie." The family expresses their concern for Mrs. King and hopes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King following a recent accident.

Rauschenbusch on Sin

Dr. King references and outlines Rauschenbusch's view on sin. Rauschenbusch was a Baptist minister and a key figure in the Social Gospel movement.

Letter from Debbie Steiner to MLK

Sunday, May 17, 1964

Debbie Steiner of Willburn, New Jersey tells Dr. King how she was moved by his article in Life magazine, which she calls "a realistic summary of why the Negro can not wait." She explains her discontent with prejudice and inquires about how young people can influence change.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Letter from Harry Denman to Billy Graham and MLK

Friday, June 18, 1965

Harry Denman, an evangelist at the Methodist Church in Nashville, Tennessee, writes to Dr. King and Dr. Billy Graham in the hope that they will appear together for eight consecutive nights on a television program to be broadcast nationally and themed "God's Society."


Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

Ed Clayton creates a brochure on behalf of SCLC. The brochure contains a message from Dr. King, pictures of SCLC members, a history of the organization and information regarding their initiatives.

Letter from Dimitri Papaspyrou to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dimitri Papaspyrou, President of the Parliament, invites Dr. King to Greece to create a better understanding between Greek and American people.

Death of Dr. King

This photo was taken after Dr. King's assassination and contains slogans in support for the fallen leader.

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Letter from Mrs. Thomas Walsh to Dr. Roy Enquist

Monday, June 5, 1967

Mrs. Thomas Walsh writes to Dr. Roy J. Enquist regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at St. Mary's University, St. Edward's University and the Texas Lutheran College.

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Thursday, January 13, 1966

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Robert F. Thorne's Response to the SCLC

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Robert F. Thorne expresses his commitment to the civil rights cause, but will discontinue his financial contributions to the SCLC due to Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Letter from E.M. Fruchter to MLK Regarding Hotel Reservations

Monday, December 12, 1966

E.M. Fruchter is notifying Dr. King of the hotel accomodations made on his behalf. He list the cost of the rooms per night and request a fifty-dollar deposit from Dr. King.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Flyer for Confront the Warmakers at the Pentagon

This flyer from the Southern California Mobilization Committee advertises a public meeting. At the meeting, the committee plans to provide comprehensive reports from Washington and display a slide show of recent demonstrations. In addition, they plan to discuss future SCMC activities.

Letter from Lou Goldstein to NAACP, February 6, 1968

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

In this letter, Lou Goldstein contacts the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to inquire about the location of photographs of Dr. King, Roy Wilkins, and A. Philip Randolph.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.