The Archive

Search results for:

Excerpt from MLK's Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King discusses nonviolent resistance and freedom. He further challenges various communities by coining the slogan, "hate is always tragic."

Letter from Rev. Robert E. DuBose, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966

The Rev. Robert E. DuBose Jr. offers a prayer to Dr. King, after his march in Jackson, Mississippi. Rev. DuBose was not able to attend the march.

Blank Jury Questionnaire to MLK

This Jury Questionaire was sent to Dr. King by The Fulton County Court House.

Letter to Mrs. King from Lillian Tynec

Saturday, October 10, 1959

Lillian Tynec writes Mrs. King to request the travel details related to a Women's Day program.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

What Is Salvation

Dr. King writes notes regarding several components of salvation.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack H. O'Dell

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

In response to recent allegations, Dr. King and members of the SCLC Administrative Committee conduct a formal investigation on Mr. O'Dell's reported association with Communist affiliates. Dr. King regrettably informs him that due to this speculation, despite lack of concrete results, he must permanently resign from his position with the SCLC's New York office.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

Letter from Louise A. Andrews to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961

On behalf of the American Friends Service Committee, Louise Andrews invites Dr. King to attend and speak at one of their Regional offices in Pennsylvania or Wisconsin.

Letter from Mary Blount to MLK

Sunday, March 6, 1966

Mrs. Blount urges Dr. King to come to Philadelphia. She acknowledges Dr. King as a "man of God" and herself as a "sinner saved by grace."

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Manuscript

Thursday, March 9, 1967

In this letter, Genevieve Young informs Joan Daves of the notes created for the manuscript of Dr. King's book and questions about the sources of some of Dr. King's facts.

Men Who Live Differently

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Edward Taylor, an African American soldier in Vietnam, requests Dr. King's aid in a military justice matter.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marie Freckelton

Friday, February 15, 1963

Dora McDonald sends acknowledgement of the receipt of a letter and photograph on behalf of Dr. King to Marie Freckelton.

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1962

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

Letter from Mary L. Rhett to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Mary Rhett writes Dr. King informing him that she has a very important matter to discuss with him regarding the civil rights struggle.

Schleiermacher (Dogmas & Creeds)

Dr. King references Friedrich Schleiermacher's notions of dogmas and creeds, stating that they are mere descriptions of feeling.

Letter from John D. Silvera to MLK

Thursday, March 15, 1962

John D. Silvera proposes several mass media initiatives to Dr. King. Attached to this letter is a memorandum with additional information.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nemichandra

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding the structure and function of the SCLC. He informs the inquirer that he is enclosing pamphlets and brochures in hopes that the literature will successfully address all of his questions.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

Levels of Love

Dr. King outlines several levels of love, such as Christian love, utilitarianism love and romantic love.

Telegram from MLK to Nicholas Biddle

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King apologizes to Nicholas Biddle for being unable to attend the testimonial for Senator Jacob Javits.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

Letter from Norman Edward & Katherine Kowal to SCLC

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Impressed by a sermon delivered by Dr. King, Norman Edward and Katherine Ann Kowal contributes to the SCLC.

Card from the English Family

The English Family sends a card that lists words of encouragement for each day of the week.

Social Philosophy

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.”

Letter from MLK to Charles H. Dorr

Friday, January 5, 1968

Dr. King writes Charles Dorr acknowledging his support of the young African American men who are boycotting the Olympic games. King states, "the country must concern itself with the plight of all Negroes and not just the privileged few."