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"ZAMBIA"

Letter from Kerry Clayton to MLK 11/20/66

Sunday, November 20, 1966

Kerry Clayton informs Dr. King that she was asked to do a third grade report about his life. She also requested for Dr. King to send a picture to include in the report. Kerry Clayton was a resident of China Lake, California.

Shriver Outlines Summer Program

Saturday, March 4, 1967

This New York Times article reports that if Congress approves the $75 million supplemental appropriation for antipoverty programs, Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, plans to use $47 million for the Neighborhood Youth Corps and $25 for community action agencies to help provide youth with employment and recreation. It also mentions efforts in the Senate to increase the supplemental appropriation.

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

Christianity

Dr. King references Emil Brunner's argument on Christianity.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

SCLC North Carolina Field Report

Golden Frinks, a SCLC field secretary who represented the New Bern, North Carolina chapter, releases a field report. This report discusses the SCLC Action Program in North Carolina, and includes a monthly overview of the SCLC's contributions.

The Philosophy Of Nonviolence And the Tactic Of Nonviolent Resistance

This document discusses the philosophy and tactic of nonviolence. The three nonviolent resisters discussed are Jesus, Gandhi, and Dr. King.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Canon L. John Collins

Friday, January 3, 1969

Mrs. King confirms with Canon L. John Collins the dates of her visit to England.

Letter from Samuel McKinney to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966

Reverend McKinney, of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, informs Dr. King he is unable to participate in the Mississippi Freedom March. A check from the Mt. Zion congregation is enclosed to assist with registering voters.

MLK Notes

Dr. King expresses concern about common attitudes towards the Church. In his words, "So often people will do a good thing, and then spoil it by some ugly twist of the spirit."

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

Agenda for the Leadership Conference Executive Committee Meeting

Arnold Aronson sends the agenda for an upcoming meeting for the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference. Important topics of discussion include the Civil Rights Act of 1967 and the Freedom Budget.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

Report on Workshop for the Huntsville Movement

Friday, March 9, 1962

This is a report about the civil rights movement in Huntsville, Alabama in the early 1960's. Hank Thomas, a CORE Field Representative, cultivated a group of students from Alabama A & M to conduct sit-ins and non-violent demonstrations at local businesses.

Ethics

Dr. King writes on the topic "ethics," according to Proverbs 6: 17-19.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Book Autographs

Friday, August 28, 1964

With this letter Joan Daves sends three copies of "Why We Cant Wait" to Ms. McDonald requesting them to be autographed by Dr. King and returned to the specified recipients.

Statement by Linda Dannenbreg

In this statement, Linda Danneberg protests the war in Vietnam by discussing the formation of the Student Mobilization Committee. She also expounds on the organization's upcoming national conference in Chicago, Illinois.

Philosophy of History

Dr. King writes about the philosophy of history according to Isaiah 41: 1-7.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from Johann R. Goelz to MLK

Tuesday, May 7, 1963

Johann R. Goelz highlights the spiritual irony that Dr. King's has the same name of the historical Martin Luther. Mr. Goelz served as a former Lutheran pastor in Germany and expounds on the religious realities of Jesus Christ.

Morality and Religion

Dr. King quotes Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God."

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

Letter from Dixie to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966

Dixie, a white man and segregationist, states in his letter to Dr. King that it has taken the Whites only a few weeks to get segregation rolling again.

MLK Speaks Before the NAACP at Winston-Salem

Sunday, October 15, 1961

This program for the Winston-Salem branch of the NAACP highlights Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Letter from Congressman Marvin Esch to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967

Congressman Esch expresses appreciation to Dr. King for supporting the anti-poverty program. Attached is a copy of the Congressman's statement regarding the "Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1967."

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964

John Lewis relays his appreciation for the advanced copy of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Telegram from Stanley G. Grizzle to MLK

Monday, September 13, 1965

Stanley G. Grizzle, Chairman of the Toronto chapter of the Martin Luther King Fund, urges Dr. King to accept the International Teach-In invitation.