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Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Schools' Mobile TV Unit Tapes Dr. King's Speech

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

This news article highlights Darien, Connecticut for the use of their mobile television unit to tape Dr. King's speech. The mobile studio was moved to Stamford High School, where students filmed the speech. Ten other schools in the area were able to see Dr. King speak with the help of this new technology.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Jespersen Og Pios Forlag has made an offer for the Danish language rights to "Strength To Love." Enclosed are agreements signed by Jespersen Og Pios Forlag.

MLK's Recommendation Letter for Alan Wachtel

This original letter was handwritten and initialed by Dr. King for Alan Wachtel, who he was recommending for law school.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Plea for Assistance from Lucille Griffin to MLK

Saturday, September 3, 1966

In this letter, Lucille Griffin asked for Dr. King's aid in obtaining satisfaction regarding an insurance dispute resulting from a home damaging storm.

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

Appreciation Letter from MLK to Maitland Griggs

Thursday, January 10, 1963

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Maitland Griggs contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to Homer A. Jack

Thursday, September 2, 1965

Rev. Ralph Abernathy submits a check on behalf of the SCLC to Homer Jack of the Unitarian Universalist Association to be donated to the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. The money will be used to purchase a new home for Jackson's parents and to finance the education for Jackson's sister. Jimmie Lee Jackson was murdered by a Alabama State Trooper while trying to protect his mother and grandfather from a beating during a march melee in Marion, Alabama. Jackson's death initiated the push for a march from Selma to Montgomery.

Letter from Ronald F. Jockers and Ronald Schlossman to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Ronald Jockers and Ronald Schlossman write Dr. King inviting him to participate in the National Collegiate Presidential Primary Choice of 1968.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Congressman Gallagher of New Jersey writes Dr. King to confirm reception of his telegram in which he urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Mississippi Congress was seated despite Congressman Gallagher's vote against the action.

Sin

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's "Pensees."

Jesus (Did Jesus Ever Live)

Dr. King references "The Historical Jesus and the Theological Christ."

The Martin Luther King Holy Land Pilgrimage

Monday, May 15, 1967

This Martin Luther King Holy Land Pilgrimage press release announces Dr. King's upcoming trip to the Holy Land and provides details about two speeches Dr. King will give.

Letter from MLK to Clifford Joesph

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mr. Joseph for donating Christmas cards to the SCLC.

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

Letter from Massachusetts Mental Health Center to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Drs. Myron Sharaf and Milton Greenblatt invite Dr. King to speak at the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Department of Mental Health where the staff and researchers share an interest in ending "hate in social life."

God (Dewey)

According to Dr. King's understanding of Dewey's interpretation, God is the connection between the ideal and the actual.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Shaefer requests that Dora McDonald send two mats and a second biographical sketch of Dr. King for use in two local papers to promote Dr. King's upcoming appearance in Pennsylvania to speak for the Hadley Memorial Fund. He also asks that Dr. King's lecture topic be sent so it may be added to the program for the speech.

Letter from Ann Thompson to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ann Thompson, a white woman, writes Dr. King expressing support and thanks for his recent speech on peace. Thompson states that Dr. King is one of the few great men living.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Reason

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "The Finding of God."

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Rev. Hewitt, pastor of the Grace United Church in Gananoque, Ontario, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also extends an invitation to Dr. King to vacation with his family at Half Moon Bay.

MLK Address at the National Biennial Convention

Wednesday, May 14, 1958

Dr. King delivers this speech at the National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. The convention took place May 1, 1958 in Miami Beach, Florida. Dr. King discusses how the Jewish and Negro communities are unified by the escape of bondage. They share a common fight against the deadly enemies of oppression. He continues on to discuss the things that need to be done in order for African Americans to reach great potential along with the importance of fighting for and obtaining democracy.

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

1964 Election

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company

Monday, April 3, 1967

The manager of Preferred Risk Mutual Auto, D.G. Witt, sends an insurance renewal request to Dr. King with policies and surcharge information. He explains that the companies decision to renew his policy was one of deep consideration due to the numerous car accidents during Dr. King's policy with the company.

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

Sincerity and Intelligence

Dr. King reviews the Christian teaching of sincerity and its relationship to intelligence. Referencing Judaistic history and a biblical story involving the Apostle Paul, he comments that sincerity alone is lacking. He insists that Christians must infuse their sincerity with intelligence in order to "solve the spiritual problems of the world."