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Letter from Judy Grey to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA

Judy Grey, a student at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, informs Dr. King of a paper she is required to complete regarding an issue in the South and requests that he provide any information concerning the movement in the South.

Thank You Letter From MLK to Mrs. Helen N. Ceder

Thursday, December 21, 1967
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mrs. Helen Ceder's contribution to Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He acknowledges that her support assists with many important projects such as voter registration and eradication of ghettos in the North.

MLK's 'People to People' Column on Education

Saturday, May 15, 1965

This article by Dr. King appeared in the New York Amsterdam News. He discusses the segregation of schools and how it is harming African American children and their opportunities.

Affidavit of Captain G.V. Evans

Wednesday, April 10, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

G.V. Evans, a captain in the Police Department of the City of Birmingham, confirms a series of sit-ins and marches that took place in Birmingham. The nonviolent actions, called Project C, was headed by Wyatt Tee Walker. Captain Evans believes that this conduct will result in serious injury to the police department and the demonstrators.

King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed

Monday, March 25, 1963
Virginia (VA)

This press release entitled, "King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed," highlights Dr. King's challenge to moderate white southerners to become more vocal against racial injustices.

MLK's Speech on Civil Rights and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks about his role as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and his position on the Vietnam War.

MLK Cited in Damage Suit

Sunday, September 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The New York Times reports that Dr. King is one of the defendants in a $15 Million law suit.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Missouri (MO)

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

Arianism

Dr. King writes about Arianism, a view named after Arius of Alexandria. Arianism acknowledges the divinity of God the father and Jesus the son; however, under this doctrine Jesus is subordinate to God.

Injustice

Here, Dr. King records Reinhold Niebuhr's thoughts on injustice as it relates to pride.

What Shall We Do to Be Saved

This is an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King, entitled, "What Shall We Do To Be Saved?" It includes an intended introduction. The date and location for which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, January 13, 1964
New York (NY)

Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

Friday, April 8, 1966
New York, NY

Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

Reason and Faith

Dr. King writes a quote from William Spurrier's Guide to the Christian Faith.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Wednesday, April 11, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Wallace Terry extends his appreciation for Dr. King's visit to Washington, D. C. and sends best wishes from Jack Eisen to Mrs. King.

Dignitaries Attending the Spring Moblization

Presented here is a list of political and social leaders attending a mobilization held in the spring.

Letter to Mrs. King from Patricia Pleas

Friday, April 5, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

This letter of condolence originates from East Orange, NJ, and is addressed to Mrs. King. The letter was written the day, following Dr. King's assassination, and its receipt stamp date would suggest the vast volume of mail, in the aftermath of his death.

Letter from the American Embassy in New Delhi, India to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965
New Delhi, India, Montgomery, AL, CHINA, INDIA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, PAKISTAN

The Embassy of the United States invites Dr. King to come and visit India for at least a month. He can lecture in his special areas of interests. The embassy states that the best time to come is between November and April.

Death

Dr. King records some notes on death.

Song of Songs

Dr. King writes a brief summary of the book Song of Songs.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, GHANA, HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE), NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, SWEDEN, FRANCE

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Aristotle

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Aristotelian philosophy.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Columbus, OH, Chicago, IL, Pittsburgh, PA

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

Telegram from Congressman Seymour Halpern to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965
Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

In this telegram to Dr. King in Selma jail, Congressman Seymour Halpern expresses his regret that he is unable to travel to Mississippi.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Canon L. John Collins

Friday, January 3, 1969
London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

Mrs. King confirms with Canon L. John Collins the dates of her visit to England.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
New York, NY

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the German edition of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", published by Econ Verlag, for the period 1/1/65 to 12/31/65.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

Washington, D.C.

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, CUBA, Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

Saturday, February 11, 1967
Georgia (GA)

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.