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Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Sadye Brooks

Friday, April 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to the Brooks family on the recent loss of their beloved husband and father.

MLK Note

New York (NY)

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Letter from MLK to Lenn Latham

Ohio (OH)

Dr. King expresses gratitude for support of his work and advises that nonviolence is the only way to achieve change.

Letter from Autieve Smith of Revelation Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, August 25, 1964
Cincinnati, OH

Autieve Smith writes on behalf of Revelation Baptist Church to express their happiness in Dr. King's acceptance in being a part of their program with the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights Choir. Smith informs Dr. King of the time and place of his address and asks that he provide the committee with the needed information to plan his accommodations.

Telegram from MLK to Men of Conscience

Friday, March 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes the Men of Conscience at Morehouse College to commend their "group act to find a creative alternative to the military." He assures the group that they have his prayers and support, and expresses hope that he will be able to meet with them soon.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, Connecticut (CT), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

Letter from Ms. Gitta Gossmann to Ms. Dora McDonald

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
New York (NY)

Ms. Gossmann writes to Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's "Strength to Love." Enclosed in the letter are contract copies for the Italian-language edition of the publication.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965
DENMARK, Montgomery, AL, FRANCE

Bent Ostergaard, a member of Amnesty International, informs Dr. King that his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize served as a great pleasure for the Danish people. The Danish section of Amnesty International requests Dr. King's appearance during his travel to Europe. Mr. Ostergaard notifies Dr. King that his expenses will be covered and they would like to give him a tour of the public institutions in Denmark.

Telegram to MLK from the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Saturday, October 31, 1964
SWEDEN, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

A coalition of Swedish dignitaries send their congratulations to Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize and extend and invitation for Dr. King to visit Sweden either before or after his trip to Oslo, Norway to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Mass Mailing from the Model Inner city Community Organization

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This is a form letter from the Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy informing the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. about Dr. King's visit to help revitalize the area.

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, December 3, 1946
EGYPT, GREECE

Dr. King writes six short essays for an examination in his Bible course.

Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."

All Local 1 Members Invited

New Jersey (NJ)

All Local 1 members are invited to hear Dr. King discussing the intricacies of "The Summer Project."

Antidotes For Fear

MEXICO, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Sen. Edward Brooke Press Release

Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SENEGAL, GUINEA, Co'te D'IVOIRE / IVORY COAST, GHANA, NIGERIA, LIBERIA, CONGO / ZAIRE, ZAMBIA, TANZANIA, UGANDA, ETHIOPIA, KENYA, New York (NY)

Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts travels to Africa to discuss world affairs and the needs of the country with African leaders. Also, his itinerary for the trip is present.

March on Washington Record

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

Entitled "We Shall Overcome!" this document advertises the selling of the "authorized record" of the 1963 March on Washington. The record includes "inspiring songs of freedom" and speeches from the historical march.

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Letter from MLK to William Sibley

Monday, July 13, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King thanks Dr. Sibley for his contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He also reports the results of a recent fundraising reception, which will be used to establish Dr. Robert Hayling's practice and provide legal defense to participants in the Albany and St. Augustine Movements.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marshall E. Bean

Thursday, July 8, 1965
Maine (ME)

Dora McDonald communicates to Marshall E. Bean that Dr. King is remembering him in his prayers and sends a photograph as a visual reminder. Miss McDonald also includes a scripture from the Book of Psalms.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, MEXICO

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter to Dora McDonald from Fernando Arias-Salgado

Monday, May 22, 1967
SPAIN

Fernando Arias-Salgado acknowledges receipt of Ms. McDonald's letter on behalf of Dr. King and transmits it to Dr. Palasi in Madrid. He also encloses the initial letter of invitation to lecture at the University of Madrid under the signature of Dr. Villar, Director of Cultural Sociology.

Birmingham Manifesto

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama by the African American community and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), California (CA)

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

New Wine in New Bottles

Dr. King outlines a sermon he preached at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery on October 17, 1954. His text is Matthew 9:17. He compares new ideas to new wine, stating that an idea cannot progress if people are not ready to accept it; this is what it means for an idea to be before its time. New ideas require new structures to contain them. The same is true in our personal lives when we resolve to rid ourselves of bad habits.

Letter from Mrs. E. A. Johnson to Mrs. Cotton

Saturday, March 31, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

A young male civil rights activist and participant in demonstrations experienced police brutality after he was targeted for his involvement in the Monroe Race Riot story. E. A. Johnson provides Mrs. Cotton with the legal details of the case surrounding the young man.

Letter from Linda Frawley to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

Linda Frawley, the campus coordinator for Suffolk University, requests any "pseudo-campaign" materials that Dr. King may be able to send. The materials are to be used in the National Intercollegiate Presidential Primary, sponsored by Time Magazine.