Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"ZIMBABWE"

Letter from a Tenant to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Dr. King received many unsigned letters from tenants in sub-standard housing in urban areas. Chicago was one of the main cities because Dr. King actually lived and conducted SCLC business there for a time. A tenant from a Chicago apartment complex writes to Dr. King suggesting that he discreetly visit the building to learn first hand of the unacceptable living conditions.

Radio Sermons Listing

Under the title "Radio Sermons," is a listing of sermon titles and dates given by Dr. King.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Letter from Curtis Harris to MLK

Monday, February 1, 1965

Curtis W. Harris, of the Virginia State Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, wrote to Dr. King to alert him that the Smithfield Packing Company has a labor situation very similar to that of Scripto in Atlanta. Harris explains that none of the senior Negro employees are in the appropriate income bracket and could use Dr. King's assistance.

Letter from Bob Abel to MLK

In this letter Bob Abel encloses a contribution from a friend in England to Dr. King while also commenting on Vietnam and the link to Civil Rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Wednesday, July 11, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.

Selma to Montgomery Commemorative Rally Suggestion

This outline features a tentative agenda, statement of purpose, and key logistical information pertaining to the commemorative rally celebrating the completion of the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

Letter from David Gibbons and David O. Woodward to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963

David Woodyard and David Gibbons send Dr. King a check to support the work of the SCLC. Woodyard and Gibbons are employed at Denison University in Granville, Ohio.

Letter from MLK to Miss R. Berkenvelder

Monday, November 22, 1965

Dr. King writes to Miss Berkenvelder, agreeing that silent and non-active individuals maintained the severity of injustices. He further elaborates on his prayer that warriors will form who are committed to nonviolence and world peace.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Letter from S. Leiss to MLK

Saturday, March 6, 1965

The Joan Daves Agency sends Dr. King a check from Oxford University Press for royalties associated with the reprint of "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in Alpheus T. Mason's "Free Government in the Making."

Letter from Lionel H. Newsom to MLK Regarding Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

In this letter, Lionel H. Newsom, the General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., provides Dr. King with a check for support.

Court Summons for MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963

The Circuit Court of Dallas County issues Dr. King a summons to appear before the Grand Jury.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding the safety of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth during his 90 day jail sentence.

Philadelphia Inquirer: Balance of Payments 'Cure' Was Devised in Near-Panic

Thursday, January 11, 1968

This article by Rowland Evans and Robert Novak criticizes a proposed 2% border tax on imported goods. They argue that President Johnson's support of such a measure is reckless and will cause economic repercussions around the world.

Letter from MLK to Rev. William A. Dennis

Monday, January 20, 1958

Dr. King requests the presence of Reverend Dennis at a SCLC Executive Board meeting in Atlanta, GA. Reverend Dennis responds by stating he will not be able to attend, but he will send someone in his place.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Letter from Michael Greywitt from to MLK Requesting Interview

Friday, May 21, 1965

In this letter dated 5/21/1965, Greywitt informs Dr. King that there have been many requests from listeners requesting an interview from Dr. King on the "current status of the Civil Rights Movement". Greywitt is the producer of the Michael Jackson Program on the CBS Radio Pacific Network.

High School Seniors in Chicago Request Conversation with MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

Edward Foreman, on behalf of the senior class at J.H. Bowen High School in Chicago, Illinois, invites Dr. King to lead a discussion regarding the issues that brought about Dr. King's adventure to Chicago.

Letter from Mr. Herbert. H. Fisher to MLK

Saturday, July 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher, President of the Chatham Avalon Park Community Council, provides an organized detailed account of community concerns. More specifically, he addresses various social and political issues regarding schools, housing, insufficient leadership, and government services.

Letter from Alan Sapiro to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Alan Sapiro, Public Relations Officer of Bankers Trust Company, writes Dr. King enclosing a letter he wrote to the New York Times that contains comments the Reverend made during a Peace Rally press conference at the United Nations.

Letter from US Citizen to MLK

"A citizen who loves the country God let him own," writes to Dr. and Mrs. King criticizing them on their views on Vietnam and their ministerial work in regards to Christianity.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Wednesday, September 23, 1959

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Letter from Ted Bleecker to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

Ted Bleecker, Director of Publications for the United Federation of Teachers, extends gratitude to Dr. King for his statement in the Federation's 50th anniversary issue. Enclosed is a copy of the issue in which Dr. King congratulates the Federation, draws comparisons between the attitudes of the Federation and the Civil Rights Movement, and thanks them for receipt of the John Dewey Award.

Letter from Thomas Scroth to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King receives an invitation to the Forum Committee dinner in Washington, DC. This correspondence provides details of the format and location of the event.

Letter from Margo George to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Margo George, a student at the Kent School, wrote to Dr. King requesting any suggestions on how she could help with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 6, 1967

Joan Daves sends Dora McDonald a letter of thanks concerning a photostat of a letter sent to Dr. King. She also informs her that although the title of Dr. King's book has been used, one cannot copyright titles.