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Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, St. Augustine, FL, Cleveland, OH, Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Illinois (IL), CONGO / ZAIRE, CANADA

Miss Dora McDonald provides Dr. King with a synopsis of updates regarding invitations and correspondences. She notifies Dr. King of the Ann Morris School of Arts attendance at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Eugene Carson Blake's response to Dr. King's acceptance to speak, and V. M. Herron requests of 300 "Black is Beautiful" pamphlets. In addition, she informs Dr. King of the recent telephone calls from various individuals.

Evil

Dr. King defines the concept of good and evil by refrencing Philip S. Richards' "Belief of Man."

Telegram from Philip A. Randolph to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
New York (NY)

Philip A. Randolph writes Dr. King concerning Negro leaders being invited to discuss problems of the movement on NBC television.

Schleiermacher (Definition of Theology)

Dr. King quotes and interprets Friedrich Schleiermacher's definition of dogmatic theology in "The Christian Faith."

Letter from Annette P. Johnson to Reverend Charles C. Carpenter

Tuesday, May 14, 1963
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Annette P. Johnson writes Bishop Carpenter concerning her initiative to seek better understanding of his status on supporting racial equality. Johnson believes that Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" was directed at Reverend Carpenter and other Southern clergymen like him.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, August 16, 1962
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper and Row, requests for Dr. King to give commentary on Louis Lomax's book "The Negro Revolt."

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

Friday, June 26, 1964
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Jenner School Parents

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Presented here is a rough draft of an address delivered by Dr. King to the parents of Jenner Elementary school located in Chicago, Ill. Dr. King advises a plan to counteract deplorable school conditions as well as the misappropriation of tax dollars.

Letter from Carleton L. Spier to MLK

Wednesday, January 11, 1967
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), New York (NY), VIETNAM, Alabama (AL)

Spier shares his disapproval of Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell and his concern regarding Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Lenore Aikens to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
CANADA

Lenore Aikens congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She also asks how the Christian Citizenship Committee of United Church Women can be a part of the cause.

Royalty Statement for MLK

Tuesday, December 6, 1966
New York, NY, FRANCE

This royalties statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King details the earnings and number of copies sold for the French edition of "The Strength to Love" during the given time period.

SCLC Newsletter: April 1962

Sunday, April 1, 1962
Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Chattanooga, TN, Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Jackson, MS, Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Ohio (OH), Shreveport, LA, South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces five new members will join the staff. The five men are: John H. Calhoun, Herbert V. Coulton, James L. Bevel, Fred C. Bennette, and Bernard S. Lee. These men derive from different locations across America and add different levels of education and commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Friday, December 29, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

Request For Information Sent to MLK from Abram Eisenman

Georgia (GA)

This second "Request For Information" was sent from Abram Eisenman to Dr. King. He asks Dr. King if he and members of his organization will support him for president. He gives Dr. King five main points of his platform that he hopes to achieve as president. He believes it is "imperative" that someone run against President Johnson and unite the American people based on his platform.

Letter from William W. Stafford to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

William Stafford expresses admiration, gratitude and support for Dr. King's work with the Civil Rights Movement and his stand against the Vietnam War.

Letter from S. Leiss to Dr. King about Payment from Simon and Schuster, Inc.

Thursday, April 29, 1965
New York (NY)

Here in this notation, Leiss references a check enclosure as a permission fee to reprint "I Have a Dream" in the "Treasure of the World's Greatest Speeches" literature.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter Seeger

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
New York (NY), Tokyo, Japan, JAPAN

Ms. McDonald informs American folk singer,Peter Seeger, that Dr. King will be unable to accept the invitation to appear on a Japan television program in January or February of the coming year. Dr. King asks that Mr. Seeger informs the program host that sometime during the summer would be more favorable for his schedule.

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 7, 1963
New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

Thank You Letter from MLK Regarding Albany Incarceration

Monday, August 20, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King thanks his supporters for sending him encouraging letters during his incarceration in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from John Lawton to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

John Lawton, the Chairman of the Speech Department at Boston College, informs Dr. King about his program of student speakers who discuss various controversial issues with different organizations in New England. The objective of his program is to inform the community of civil rights issues involving education and employment. Furthermore, Mr. Lawson requests a conference with Dr. King to review the program concept.

Telegram from Richard Daley to Dr. King

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Richard Daley is requesting Dr. King's presence at the Mayor's office to discuss ways of improving the education, employment, health, and living conditions to help the youth in the city of Chicago. Department Heads will be present at the meeting to answer questions and discuss recommendations that aid the city in achieving their goals.

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

Thursday, May 28, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, INDIA, INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

God (Dewey)

According to Dr. King's understanding of Dewey's interpretation, God is the connection between the ideal and the actual.

Letter from Joe Augustine to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Mr. Augustine claims that he is able to point directly to who is responsible for the wrong that is going on in the country, and would like to mail Dr. King more information to this effect.

Letter from a "White Power Militant"

A disgruntled writer criticizes leadership in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK about Portugeese Translation of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, November 16, 1966
BRAZIL, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Earl M. Smith writes to Dr. King requesting permission to translate and publish the book "Strength to Love" in Portuguese. Mr. Smith states that a Fellowship of Reconciliation representative can be responsible for translating.

Statement Regarding Fred L. Shuttlesworth's Court Appearances

Tuesday, July 12, 1966
Louisville, KY, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

This document explains Rev. Shuttlesworth upcoming court appearances as a result of his civil rights activities. He faces charges for blocking a sidewalk during a demonstration and for protesting at Drake Memorial Hospital.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

MLK's Speech Notes

FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

In these speech notes, Dr. King references the plight of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union and the silent betrayal of onlookers. John Donne is quoted in his famous excerpt, "No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main."

Letter from Alfred Martin of the Jefferson Democratic Association to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961
California (CA), San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

Alfred Martin, representing the Jefferson Democratic Association, offers his support to Dr. King and the struggle for equality in the south. He forwards two documents to Dr. King pertaining to his potential run for Congress and his ideas to assist Negroes in being able to vote. Martin also encloses a donation and apologizes for his inability to send more.