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MLK Address at the National Biennial Convention

Wednesday, May 14, 1958

Dr. King delivers this speech at the National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. The convention took place May 1, 1958 in Miami Beach, Florida. Dr. King discusses how the Jewish and Negro communities are unified by the escape of bondage. They share a common fight against the deadly enemies of oppression. He continues on to discuss the things that need to be done in order for African Americans to reach great potential along with the importance of fighting for and obtaining democracy.

Letter from MLK to Roberta Evans

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Evans for her kind gesture in sending a letter enclosed with a book by Will Campbell. Dr. King believes his views on race will be a benefit to him.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

Is Dr. King Used as Soviet Decoy?

This article discusses Dr. King's forthcoming visit to Russia to speak with representatives from the US and North and South Vietnam. Dr. King seeks to assist in ending the war in Vietnam; however, onlookers do not think his actions will lead to positive results.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Welcome to Kennett Square, Dr. King

Thursday, September 15, 1966

The highlighted article of this newspaper clipping reports on Dr. King's upcoming visit to Kennett High School in Chester County, Pennsylvania at the invitation of the Hadley Memorial Fund program committee. The editorial addresses dissenters who object to Dr. King's visit to Kennett Square for various reasons, including perceived threats of civil disobedience and because Dr. King "fails to measure up as cultural material." However, the author insists that Dr.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

SCLC Voter Registration Agenda

This document captures the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's voter registration agenda in Detroit, Michigan between August 18 and August 23, 1967.

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

Telegram from Jack Paley to MLK

Jack Paley informs Dr. King that he has the support of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union as Dr. King works "to win decent treatment for Negroes in public facilities of Atlanta."

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

Rev. Frederick Hewitt of Grace United Church writes Dr. King inviting him to visit the Thousand Islands for a combination of preaching with summer vacation.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.

Letter from MLK to Michelle Feinberg

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King responds to Michelle Feinberg, a special education student from Gary, Indiana. In the letter, Dr. King tells Michelle her letter meant a lot to him and she is fortunate to have a special teacher.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

Letter from Marion Logan to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Marion Logan writes to Dr. King to discuss his possible involvement with Project H. "Project H calls for Black America to demand of Congress ten billion dollars now to appropriate for the Federal Housing...that are administered by HUD."

Letter from MLK to Devorah E. Sherman

Friday, July 31, 1964

Dr. King writes Mrs. Devorah Sherman to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Congressman John McCormack to MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Congressional House Speaker John McCormack writes that he is very glad the McCulloch Substitute Bill was rejected by the House of Representatives.

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Friday, November 18, 1966

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

Notes for an Address to Memphis Strikers

Dr. King drafted these notes, which were used in an address given in Memphis, Tennessee in March of 1968. "Dives" is a Biblical character who refused to give aid to the poor and was condemned for it.

Letter from Frances Pauley to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964

Mrs. Pauley, Executive Director of the Georgia Council on Human Relations, thanks Dr. King for his contribution to her organization.

Letter from Floyd Mulkey to MLK

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Floyd Mulkey writes Dr. King a letter, commending him on his plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter From Joseph Livingston to MLK Regarding Receipt of Letter

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Here Joseph Livingston beckons Dr. King to confirm receipt of a letter sent in reference to what he describes as "a matter of Life and Death".

MLK Question Response on Ministry and Segregation

This document features Dr. King's listed "Question: How far is the fact that you are a minister involved in your action?" and its subsequent answer. Citing the "church...[as]...the chief moral guardian of the nation," Dr. King uses the example of the Southern Baptist Convention's hypocrisy regarding segregation.

Inauguration Response by J. Lynwood Gresham

Friday, November 10, 1967

This document is the inauguration response delivered by Dr. J. Lynwood Gresham of Barber-Scotia College.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

Letter from Claudia Harris to MLK

Claudia Harris informs Dr. King that Dana College is participating in "Choice 68." She also requests material on Dr. King's position regarding the Vietnam War, civil rights, the urban crisis and the federal budget.