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Letter from Emily Barton Arrabee to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963
New Hampshire (NH)

Ms. Arrabee sends a check to Dr. King not for the SCLC, but for Dr. and Mrs. King to use to treat themselves in some way. Arrabee suggests a book, a new record or dinner together. The check is a token of her respect and admiration for both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from Rev. Canon John S. Yaryan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 13, 1964
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Yaryan writes to confirm Dr. King's appearance at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. He asks that Dr. King preach not only for their morning service, but also the evening worhsip service as well.

Sin

Dr. King writes on sin as described in Jeremiah 4:22.

Letter to Men of Morehouse from Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays

Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays discusses the events during Centennial Founders Week at Morehouse College for those who were not in attendance. He also informs the Men of Morehouse of the upcoming commencement ceremony.

You and the Poor People's Campaign

Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Greenwood, MS

This document contains detailed information regarding the Poor People's Campaign. This document also discusses the Satyagraha movement, a nonviolent movement that means "truth force."

Letter from MIT/Harvard Joint Center for Urban Studies to MLK

Thursday, July 6, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C.

In this letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Director Daniel P. Moynihan asks Dr. King to assist him and his organization by advocating for an increase in funds for the 1970 Census. The purpose is to "improve the enumeration of Negroes, Puerto Ricans, and Mexican-Americans".

Transcript: Press Conference USA

Friday, July 5, 1963
GHANA, South Carolina (SC), Washington (WA), INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Robert Lodge questions Dr. King about the future and past of the Civil Rights Movement during a Press Conference USA recording.

3000 Jackson Negros Flay Headstart Cutoff

Mississippi (MS)

This article discusses the protest of African Americans to the ending of the Headstart nursey program, and the reallocation of those funds to other state programs.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Letter from Vice President Nixon to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1957
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Vice President Richard Nixon writes Dr. King to say he enjoyed their recent conversation. He encloses copies of speeches he has made on civil rights.

Letter from James G. T. Fairfield to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967
Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

"Alive" magazine editor James G. T. Fairfield expresses gratitude to Dr. King for sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here." Fairfield also sends several copies of his magazine, a publication of Mennonite Broadcasting which published an excerpt of Dr. King's "Riverside" speech.

Letter from MLK to Clara Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to Clara Bell Graves thanking her for the encouraging letter. Dr. King states, "please be assured that we welcome with grateful heart such letters as the one you directed to me."

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes to Dr. King regarding his "I Have A Dream" speech.

Letter from Norue Crickson to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Michigan (MI)

Twelve-year-old Norue Crickson commends Dr. King for his civil rights efforts. He expresses that from now on he will offer his "prayers for this cause."

Letter from G. Merrill Lenox to MLK

Friday, April 19, 1963
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

G. Merrill Lenox, Executive Director for the Metropolitan Detroit Council of Churches, informs Dr. King he is being remembered and in the daily prayers of thousands during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Annual Report, 1955-1956

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Pennsylvania (PA), Chester, PA, Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Columbus, OH, Ohio (OH), Birmingham, AL, Dallas, TX, Texas (TX), New York, NY, Pittsburgh, PA, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), San Francisco, CA, Wisconsin (WI), CANADA, Cleveland, OH, Colorado (CO), Denver, CO, North Carolina (NC), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

This report contains vital information concerning the organizational structure, services, and members of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Dr. King provides a heartfelt address to the Montgomery, AL congregation as he seeks to extend the church's influence throughout the community amidst his growing involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Negro Morality and Why Didnt She Stay Home?

Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, recommends two articles published in The Carolina Israelite. "Negro Morality" makes distinctions between crime committed by impoverished Negroes and their ethically challenged white counterparts. The second article,"Why Didn't She Stay Home?" discusses tactics of the "Far Right," the ignoring of crimes committed against Negroes, and the role of both white and black clergy in the preservation of Christian ideals.

A Background Paper for the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing

Friday, December 2, 1966
Delaware (DE), Washington, D.C.

This paper is intended to catalyze discussion at the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. By providing facts and analysis pertaining to Wilmington and surrounding areas, the paper is written to help familiarize attendees of the housing situation in Delaware. A key goal is to educate on the racial disparity and deterioration of urban areas. "The national housing objective is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing to all people" and this document encourages the execution of developed solutions.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

VIETNAM, New York (NY), New York, NY, Rhode Island (RI), FRANCE, CAMBODIA, LAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC, THAILAND, New Jersey (NJ), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, PHILIPPINES, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, HAITI, NICARAGUA

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

New Politics Convention. Chicago, 1967

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter From A.H. Emmott to MLK

Thursday, February 6, 1964
Georgia (GA), CANADA, San Francisco, CA, Texas (TX)

A. H. Emmott congratulates Dr. King on winning Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" award and invites him to speak at the Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities in Canada. The UMBC is an organization, which represents the interests of local governments within the Province of British Columbia.

Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.

Letter from James E. Byrd to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

James E. Byrd, Campus Coordinator at Lenoir Rhyne College, writes Dr. King requesting materials for the Choice '68 campaign.

Letter From MLK Concerning the Sustainability of SCLC

Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Mississippi (MS)

Addressing the recipients of this letter as "Friends", Dr. King shares the triumphs and struggles of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference while on its continuous quest for civil rights. He concludes the message by encouraging readers to contribute support to this "urgent moral crusade".

The Ben Bella Conversation

ALGERIA, CUBA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King summarizes his recent two-hour meeting with Premier Ahmed Ben Bella of the newly-formed Algerian Republic. He mentions that Ben Bella was intimately familiar with the details of the civil rights movement and repeatedly said or inferred that “we are brothers.” King states that “the battle of the Algerians against colonialism and the battle of the Negro against segregation is a common struggle.” There are international implications for the US if it doesn’t solve its human rights problem: the nation will become a second-rate power in the world.

Letter from Ann and George Laringer to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), VIETNAM

George Levinger's extends his gratitude to Dr. King for his stand against Vietnam. Levinger states, "One can preach nonviolence at home and ignore the violence abroad."

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Vernon W. Stone

Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King commends Dr. Vernon Stone on his superb teaching career and upcoming move to become the first Negro professor at a University in Atlanta.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King outlines the two assumptions that one must have while studying the work of Kierkegaard.

Dr. Paul Arthur Scilpp Speech in Illinois

Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

In this address delivered before the National Assembly for Progress in Equality of Opportunity in Housing, Dr. Paul Arthur Schilpp speaks about equality between races, "pure" race, and voting rights for Negroes.