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Dr. King quotes Plato's views regarding God.


Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.

Evil (Psalm)

Dr. King notes that Psalm 73 raises the question of why the wicked prosper and suggests that the only solution for the mystery of evil is faith.

The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and The Christian Ministry

In this essay fragment from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King writes that Christianity is a value philosophy whose values are embodied in the life of Christ. He begins to spell out what those values are. The first, King states, is the value of the world as something positive and life-affirming, in contrast to the negative view of the world of the ascetics and religions of India. The second value is that of persons, who have supreme worth. People must be used as ends, never as means to ends, although there have been periods in history where Christianity has fallen short.


Dr. King quotes Marcus Tullius Cicero’s “De Natura Deorum,” providing references from William Wallace’s “The Logic of Hegel.”

Theology and Science

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as a source on theology and science.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.


Dr. King discusses how the discoveries of renowned astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and German philosopher Immanuel Kant revolutionized thinking regarding the human mind. The note card also outlines philosophical views originating from the "analogy of two clocks" referencing prominent thinkers Rene Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz.

Mastering Our Fears


Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

The World of the Patriarchs


Dr. King records historical and geographical data regarding several countries, such as Egypt, Greece, and Palestine. King places a special emphasis on the "World of the Patriarch," the title of this document, and writes notes on the "age of the Patriarch," which takes place after 2000 B. C.

Bible 252


This exam from a course entitled "Bible 252" lists forty-eight questions regarding Biblical knowledge.


Dr. King discusses the meaning of the Book of Daniel, namely to reinforce the idea of the kingdom of God.


Dr. King's focuses on religious beliefs and their relation to intellectual concepts.


Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne. The first name Gordon on the note card is incorrect.


Dr. King references the biblical book of Numbers regarding the topic of sin.


Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.


Dr. King documents a quote by Robert Flint, a Scottish theologian and philosopher in reference to "materialism" from the "Baird Lectures."

Spirit of Law[s]

Dr. King summarizes “The Spirit of the Laws,” written by Montesquieu, a political philosopher of the Enlightenment period.

Worship Must Have Three Things

Dr. King states that "worship" must have three things: unity, movement, and rhythm.

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Scotus Eriugena.


Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Knudson, Albert C.

Dr. King cites a work by Christian theologian, Albert Knudson.

Anselm's Theory

Dr. King discusses Catholic theology referencing the theories of Aquinas and Anselm regarding the topic of "sin."

Certainty (Religious)

Dr. King refers to Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion" in regard to religious certainty.

Hell (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nikolai Berdyaev on the concept of hell.

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Thirty-nine Articles

Dr. King writes notes regarding the "basic doctrinal formula of the Anglican Church."

Augustine (Concept of Evil)

Dr. King quotes theologian St. Augustine's "Confessions."


Dr. King cites the many ways in which the concept of Monism is applied.


Dr. King records a quote from Proverbs 13:24 regarding discipline and corporal punishment.