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God

Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.

MLK's handwritten notecard regarding Fact

On this notecard, Dr. King cites the definition of the word 'fact' from The Hibbert Journal, July 1933, according to Arthur Darby Nock.

God in the Book of Psalms

Dr. King references Bible verse Psalm 71:19. He outlines why the idea of a finite God is incongruent with the "theistic absolutism" found in the Old Testament.

Arianism

Dr. King writes about Arianism, a view named after Arius of Alexandria. Arianism acknowledges the divinity of God the father and Jesus the son; however, under this doctrine Jesus is subordinate to God.

Prayer

Dr. King notes William James' description of prayer.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Evil

Dr. King writes about evil, according to Jeremiah 44: 23.

SCLC Chicago Adult Education Project

Tuesday, September 12, 1967

In this progress report, Robert L. Green and Stoney Cooks outline the education and employment conditions facing African Americans in the Lawndale community of Chicago, Illinois. The two authors further outline the program objectives, procedures, organization, and funding of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Chicago Adult Education Project which seeks to address Lawndale's social issues.

Methodology (Wieman)

Dr. King outlines the methodology of religious philosopher Henry Wieman.

Abelard

Dr. King quotes 12th century French philosopher Peter Abelard on the relationship between doubt, inquiry and truth.

Religion (Its Inescapableness)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason" on religion as the "inescapable" bind between us and the universe.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 40: 12-31.

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

Bifurcation of Nature

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead's views on the bifurcation of nature into apparent and causal nature in "The Concept of Nature."

Man

Dr. King records one atheist’s perspective on man.

The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King writes notes on perceiving God using Nelson Henry Wieman's text, "The Source of Human God."

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

War- Treitschke

Dr. King quotes Heinrich von Treitschke’s “Politics.”

Ethics

Dr. King quotes a scripture from the book of Psalms discussing ethics.

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Life (Poem)

Dr. King writes down part of playwright and composer Sir Noël Coward’s song “Twentieth Century Blues.”

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

Class Notes: Obadiah

Dr. King writes about the book of Obadiah and knowledge.

God

Dr. King quotes Psalms 111:3 and writes that "here is the familiar emphasis of the mercy and grace of God."

Judaism

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to Pope Pius XII.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Justice Versus Injustice

Dr. King explains that the power that establishes justice also generates injustice. He also references an ancient Egyptian story "The Eloquent Peasant" and James Henry Breasted's "The Dawn of Conscience."

Marx

Dr. King quotes an unknown source on Marx.