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"Education"

Sin

Dr. King summarizes and quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's view of sin in Christian Faith.

Communism

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Engles as he clarifies that Karl "Marx was not an economic determinist as many have thought." The economic situation and superstructure of society are noted as key elements.

Syllabus in Preaching and Worship

This syllabus for the course "Preaching and Worship" details the topics to be covered during the course. The following key topics are included: The Preaching Ministry of the Church, The Preparation of the Sermon, and Worship.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah demonstrating God's wrath.

Death

Dr. King meditates on death and a quotation from Thomas Carlyle in which Carlyle compares the death of his mother to the moon sinking into a dark sea.

MLK's GRE Scores

Thursday, February 1, 1951
New Jersey (NJ)

This report contains MLK's graduate record examination scores.

Evil

Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Evil

Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Ends" on the subject of evil.

Numbers

Dr. King records class notes from the biblical Book of Numbers regarding ethics, knowledge, and sin.

Religion

This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

God

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 40: 12-31.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Objects and the Nature of Thought

Dr. King notates the various explanations of "objects" and "the nature of thought."

God

Dr. King elaborates on Thomas Aquinas' views on the existence of God.

Mystery

Dr. King records a quote on mystery from Robert Flint's "The Philosophy of History."

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

Social Philosophy

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.”

Montanism

Dr. King records information about the second century Christian movement known as Montanism.

Cause, Error and Law

Dr. King quotes from Alfred North Whitehead's The Concept of Nature.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

Boston, MA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA)

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Metaphysics

Dr. King notes an insight from American psychologist and philosopher William James regarding metaphysics.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Alfred Tennyson on the topic of immortality.

Homogeneous Thoughts & Heterogeneous Thoughts

Dr. King describes Alfred North Whitehead's distinction between homogeneous and heterogeneous thought in "The Concept of Nature."

Anaximenes

Dr. King writes notes about the views of philosopher Anaximenes on the universe, comparing them to those of Thales and Anaximander.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the concept of freedom.

Origen

Dr. King records biographical information about Origen.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Sin

On this note card, Dr. King discusses the repercussions of sin according to Albrecht Ritschl.

God

Dr. King cites Ludwig Andreas Feuerbach's work "Das Wesen der Religion," in which Feuerbach illustrates his perception of God.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Wieman's Empirician

Dr. King records a quote from religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman's book, "The Source of Human Good" on the impossibility of knowing final outcomes.