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"Speeches"

I Have A Dream

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Berkeley, CA

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), New York (NY)

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

U.S. Vice Presidential Address

Friday, June 24, 1955
Washington, D.C.

These Excerpts from a Vice Presidential address made on June 24, 1955 boast the claim of moving all Americans closer to achieving the American Dream regardless of race, creed or color. The vice President lists five reasons for the success of the Eisenhower Administration in emproving equal opportunities for all Americans, including Negroes.

MLK's Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Friday, October 24, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on his brutal attack by the "deranged woman" Izola Ware Curry, in which he was stabbed near the heart. He stresses the importance of remaining committed to nonviolence and says he is grateful for the outpouring of sympathy and affection he received while in the hospital.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1960
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

Excerpt from MLK's Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King discusses nonviolent resistance and freedom. He further challenges various communities by coining the slogan, "hate is always tragic."

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, January 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C.

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA)

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

Statement by MLK

Monday, March 4, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. King warns the United States about the possibility of downfall should the federal government fail to change its policies. He sets a date for the SCLC to go to Washington D.C. and lead nonviolent demonstrations with the purpose of eradicating racism and poverty in America.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965
Alabama (AL), Baltimore, MD, Montgomery, AL, GERMANY, Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Marion, AK, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960
New York, NY, Iowa (IA), INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Cambridge, MA

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

HUNGARY, Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Address to the National Bar Association

Thursday, August 20, 1959
Wisconsin (WI), Milwaukee, WI, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Little Rock, AR, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

Discrimination Is a World Wide Issue

INDIA, New York, NY

Dr. King delivers this address speaking to humanity's failure to offset discrimination. He believes the United States, with all its technological and democratic advances, could stand to learn from the social morality of India, which is considered a "less developed nation." Dr.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

MLK Accepts Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa

In his acceptance speech at the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in Oslo, Norway, Dr. King dedicates his award to the nonviolent struggle necessary for overcoming the oppression and violence afflicting American Negroes.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Tonight Show Appearance Press Release

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The SCLC announces that Dr. King will appear on the Tonight Show with Harry Belafonte filling in for Johnny Carson as host. Comedian Nipsey Russell and actor Paul Newman, both active in the civil rights movement, will also be guests. Dr. King looks forward to this opportunity to speak about the upcoming Poor People?s Campaign.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee Democratic National Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a plea to the Democratic National Committee to provide a delegate from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party so that there may be equal representation within the state. Dr. King's feels that by providing a delegate it may discontinue the prevention of political participation of African Americans in Mississippi.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa, South Africa

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.

Another Opinion: I Oppose the War in Vietnam

VIETNAM, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

This column contains excerpts from an address given by Dr. King in Chicago, in which he expresses his concerns regarding the Vietnam War and how it will affect poverty in America.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), ITALY, CANADA

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, EGYPT, ISRAEL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.