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The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

Atlantic City, NJ, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

I Have A Dream

Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Colorado (CO), New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), New Hampshire (NH), California (CA), Tennessee (TN), Louisiana (LA)

This is an excerpt of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, as delivered at the March on Washington. The moderator asks Marion Anderson to sing, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

The Future of Integration

Wednesday, November 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

Statement Issued from Harlem Hospital by MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the staff at Harlem Hospital and those who supported him during his stay at this location. He asserts that the telegrams, letters, calls and other means of contact have been accepted as a token of respect.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963
North Carolina (NC), Birmingham, AL

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

United Auto Workers Convention Speech

Monday, May 1, 1961

Dr. King delivered this speech at the 1961 United Automobile Workers convention. He highlights the changes that have taken place in organized labor. He also connects the organized labor movement to equal opportunity in housing and the political process.

Keynote Address Introduction for Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967
Florida (FL), Maine (ME), New York (NY), California (CA)

At the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers this introduction of guest speaker, Sidney Poitier. Andrew Young further praises Mr. Poitier for informing the black community that one should be "proud to be black" because "black is beautiful."

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Thursday, August 12, 1965
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

MLK Announces The Jail Sentences Stemming from the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations

Monday, October 30, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Berkeley, CA, Wisconsin (WI), Brooklyn, NY, Ohio (OH), Selma, AL

Dr. King makes this statement regarding the arrest of himself and other leaders of the 1963 Birmingham struggle. The Supreme Court in 1967 ruled that these leaders unjustly broke the city wide injunction banning demonstrations. Dr. King urges the nation, "Take heed. Do not allow the Bill of Rights to become a prisoner of war."

Desegregation and the Future

Saturday, December 15, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 3, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Boston, MA, EGYPT, FRANCE, GERMANY, ITALY, Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), SPAIN, Virginia (VA)

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS)

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Richard Parrish and Daniel H. Watts Press Release on William Worthy Passport Case

Monday, October 22, 1962
New York, NY, Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Wisconsin (WI), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

This news release announces plans to picket the American Jewish Congress Award Banquet held for Attorney General Robert Kennedy at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. The Attorney General is to receive an award "for advancing human freedom."

MLK's Speech Notes


In these speech notes, Dr. King references the plight of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union and the silent betrayal of onlookers. John Donne is quoted in his famous excerpt, "No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main."

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

Albany, GA

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), New York (NY)

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Wednesday, September 23, 1959
Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Delaware (DE), Maryland (MD), Missouri (MO), Kentucky (KY), Oklahoma (OK), West Virginia (WV), North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Philadelphia, PA, CANADA, EGYPT, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, South Africa, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, January 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C.

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

Birmingham, AL

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.