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"Speeches"

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Wednesday, September 23, 1959
Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Delaware (DE), Maryland (MD), Missouri (MO), Kentucky (KY), Oklahoma (OK), West Virginia (WV), North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Philadelphia, PA, CANADA, EGYPT, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Statement on SCLC Commitment to Albany, Georgia

Thursday, July 12, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King announces that he is organizing an operation in Albany, Georgia in which the members of the SCLC will be present and active.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964
Atlantic City, NJ, Los Angeles, CA, Mississippi (MS), SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, GERMANY

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Philadelphia, MS, Montgomery, AL, Oslo, Norway, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL)

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

MLK Press Conference in NYC

Thursday, December 14, 1967
New York, NY, MEXICO

Dr. King speaks at a Press Conference to expresses his support for the boycotts occurring around the nation. He also stands in affirmation with the Olympic athletes who chose not to participate in the games due to the civil injustice taking place in America.

The Other America

Sunday, March 10, 1968
VIETNAM

Dr. King delivered this speech, "The Other America," for the Local 1199 Salute to Freedom program. The speech emphasized the need to address poverty, the Vietnam War, and race relations in America.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, PUERTO RICO

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Monday, August 22, 1966
Detroit, MI, New York (NY)

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 3, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Boston, MA, EGYPT, FRANCE, GERMANY, ITALY, Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), SPAIN, Virginia (VA)

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

Black Power - Dr. Vincent Harding

Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), ALGERIA, Birmingham, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), EGYPT

Dr. Harding gives a full detailed presentation on Black Power before the Southeastern Regional Advisory Board of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa, South Africa

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.

Revolution In The Classroom

Friday, March 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Selma, AL

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.

Pathos and Hope

Saturday, March 3, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

Dr. King speaks about a trip to the Mississippi Delta where he first witnessed hope and pathos simultaneously.

Text of Speech Delivered at Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This speech, given by Dr. King at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C, brings attention to the current state of oppression of Negro men and women in 1963.

The Negro Family: A Challenge to National Action

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the topic of the Negro family. He emphasizes the importance of discussing the Negro family in comparison to other races.

The 105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation-Rev. C.L. Fullwood

Rev. C.L. Fullwood drafts a sermon to commemorate the "105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclimation for the Black People of America.:

MLK Speaks to People of Watts

Thursday, August 19, 1965
California (CA), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King speaks on what it will take to make Los Angeles a better city.

Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.

MLK's Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Friday, October 24, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on his brutal attack by the "deranged woman" Izola Ware Curry, in which he was stabbed near the heart. He stresses the importance of remaining committed to nonviolence and says he is grateful for the outpouring of sympathy and affection he received while in the hospital.

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 8, 1962
New York (NY), Florida (FL), Albany, GA, Little Rock, AR, Jackson, MS, Montgomery, AL, ITALY, GERMANY, FRANCE, JAPAN

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965
South Africa, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, SPAIN, PORTUGAL, ANGOLA, MOZAMBIQUE, New York, NY, New York (NY), CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, GERMANY, JAPAN

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

MLK Address to a North Carolina Branch of the NAACP

Sunday, September 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses a public meeting of Charlotte, North Carolina's NAACP branch. He lists five actions the Negro can do to assist America with realizing the dream. The Negro must challenge the system of segregation, make efforts to gain ballots, and sacrifice to achieve freedom.

MLK's Gadsden, Alabama Rally Speech

Friday, June 21, 1963
Alabama (AL)

This transcript of Dr. King's address during the Gadsden, Alabama Rally addresses the ills of segregation in the South. He professes that the accusation of civil rights demonstrations being responsible for creating tension is equivalent to blaming the act of robbery on the wealth of man.

Gunnar Jahn's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Speech on MLK

Oslo, Norway, Montgomery, AL

Gunnar Jahn shares background information about Dr. King prior to presenting him the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. In his speech, Jahn informs the audience about the bus boycotts and the campaign for equality that Dr. King led. He also discusses Dr. and Mrs. King's choice to leave the easier life in the North to fight a racial battle in the South. Lastly he discusses Dr. King's dedication to his church and his faith in God.

Daniel B. Brewster Address before the Senate

Thursday, June 18, 1964
Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD), Illinois (IL), Montana (MT), Minnesota (MN), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Honorable Daniel B. Brewster, U. S. Senator from Maryland, addresses the President of the United States and the Second Session of the 88th Congress regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.