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"Speeches"

Movement for Puerto Rican Independence

VIETNAM, PHILIPPINES, CUBA, PUERTO RICO, NICARAGUA, CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH KOREA

Pedro Juan Rua, a leader in the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, gives a speech concerning the American military presence in Vietnam. He provides a historical framework for understanding America's involvement with other oppressed nations, asserting "U.S. rulers are new Nazis. Unite to defeat them."

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957
Little Rock, AR, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Arkansas (AR), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Jenner School Parents

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Presented here is a rough draft of an address delivered by Dr. King to the parents of Jenner Elementary school located in Chicago, Ill. Dr. King advises a plan to counteract deplorable school conditions as well as the misappropriation of tax dollars.

The Southern Struggle - What Can You Do?

North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

Corretta Scott King discusses the privilege of being able to experience a great social revolution based on love and nonviolence, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus and Gandhi. She identifies Rosa Park's personal protest on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama as the beginning of the southern struggle and consequent revolution. She goes on to describe how this simple act aroused a great movement across the south, ultimately leading to the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 1957.

Georgia Council on Human Relations

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The author informs the readers about the poverty problem in Georgia. They claim that the AFDC or "Aid to Families of Dependent Children" needs improvement. The author also mentions issues such as unemployment, education and voter registration.

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Monday, October 11, 1965
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

Friday, December 3, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

MLK Speech: Acceptance of Spingarn Medal

Friday, June 28, 1957
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King addresses the attendees at the NAACP 48th Annual Convention in Detroit, Michigan. He acknowledges the noble men and women of the Montgomery Bus Boycott Movement, for which his leadership earned him this award. Dr. King also discusses the ongoing struggle for civil rights and the nonviolent approach needed for the American Negro to win freedom and justice.

MLK on Communist Infiltration

Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to an article written by Joseph Alsop and J. Edgar Hoover that charged communism had infiltrated the Civil Rights Movement.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, SWEDEN, INDIA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC)

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964
Atlantic City, NJ, Los Angeles, CA, Mississippi (MS), SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, GERMANY

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

SCLC President's Report - MLK

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
Jackson, MS, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Illinois (IL), Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), Oregon (OR), Washington (WA), Texas (TX)

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King presents the annual report for the organization. King addresses several elements of the Civil Rights Movement as he discusses the successes, plans, goals, and vision of the SCLC in relation to the wider movement it represents.

The Road to Freedom

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Dr. King's "The Road to Freedom" speech explains "there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come." He further states that the time has indeed come for the ideas of human dignity and freedom.

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Friday, April 30, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, EGYPT, ISRAEL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965
Baltimore, MD

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

MLK - Justice Without Violence

Wednesday, April 3, 1957
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

MLK Address to the Congress of Federated Organizations

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS

Dr. King addresses the participants in the COFO Mississippi Summer Freedom Project in 1964. He pledges the full support of the SCLC to aid in their mission to register Negro voters and educate them in the process of political participation. In spite of bombings, arrests, and other forms of intimidation, Dr. King urges the members of COFO to persistently work to eliminate the roadblocks to full citizenship.

Draft of a Speech Regarding the Chicago Freedom Movement

Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

This is a draft copy of Dr. King's speech on the Chicago Freedom Movement. The intention of this movement is to end slums in Chicago. Dr. King calls upon the poverty-stricken Negro, the middle class Negro, and the white community for assistance with this movement. Dr. King also states that years after the March on Washington, he has seen his dream turn into a nightmare due to the murders of civil rights activists.

Press Statement Regarding Crusade for Citizenship

Saturday, October 5, 1957
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King delivers a statement surrounding the civil rights struggle of the Negro community and the appeals for justice to public officials. He asserts that in regards to the Prayer Pilgrimage, there cannot be a citizen whom does not have the right to vote. With the initiation of the Crusade for Citizenship, the citizenship of the Negro has the opportunity to be a reality.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Statement on Penance for Violence in Albany, Georgia

Monday, July 30, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King calls for a day of penance that will serve as a tactic of the self-purification step of the nonviolence method. Dr. King urges for the City Commission to talk with leaders of the Albany Movement.

Statement on SCLC Commitment to Albany, Georgia

Thursday, July 12, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King announces that he is organizing an operation in Albany, Georgia in which the members of the SCLC will be present and active.

Press Release on School Integration of Taliaferro County, Georgia

Thursday, October 14, 1965
Georgia (GA)

This press release by Dr. King commends the decision of the three-judge panel on the decision of school integration.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, CONGO / ZAIRE, BELGIUM, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

Statement From MLK In Response To Article Alleging Communist Ties

Thursday, July 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This press release issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference features a Statement by Dr. King responding to allegations that he and the SCLC has communist ties. Dr. King argues that the SCLC is grounded in the Christian non-violent movement with the intent of reform, wherease communism leads to violent revolution.