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MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Tuesday, October 16, 1956

In this early speech to a NY Universalists' convention, Dr. King lays out his nonviolence method, based on Gandhi's. He outlines five of the six principles he will use later. They are: active, courageous resistance; winning the moral conversion of the opponent, not defeating him; attacking the forces of evil, rather than the persons doing evil; using love to avoid "internal violence of the spirit"; and faith in the inclination of the universe towards justice.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King addresses the United Neighborhood Houses of New York at the Biltmore Hotel. He focuses on the need to alter the ineffective, piecemeal manner in which the government tries to fight poverty by fighting its symptoms, and instead suggest that the government channel those funds into a new "guaranteed annual income" that will help turn non-producers into consumers. This rough draft of the speech contains Dr. King's handwritten revisions and additions.

Black Power - Dr. Vincent Harding

Dr. Harding gives a full detailed presentation on Black Power before the Southeastern Regional Advisory Board of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

U.S. Vice Presidential Address

Friday, June 24, 1955

These Excerpts from a Vice Presidential address made on June 24, 1955 boast the claim of moving all Americans closer to achieving the American Dream regardless of race, creed or color. The vice President lists five reasons for the success of the Eisenhower Administration in emproving equal opportunities for all Americans, including Negroes.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children

The Committee of Responsibility to Save War Burned and War Injured Vietnamese Children announces a program that will bring war-maimed children from Vietnam to the United Stares for medical treatment.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

The Road to Freedom

This draft of Dr. King's "The Road to Freedom" speech explains "there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come." He further states that the time has indeed come for the ideas of human dignity and freedom.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Thursday, January 17, 1963

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

Sunday, March 28, 1965

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.

MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

Saturday, January 30, 1965

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Address to the National Bar Association

Thursday, August 20, 1959

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

The Role of the Church

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.