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Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

A Look to the Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK on the Seating of Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Georgia State Legislature has refused to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King expresses his disdain for the social injustice. His plan of action is to combat this prejudice by rallying members of the white and black community to engage in protest.

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

Monday, December 11, 1961

Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH AFRICA, BELGIUM, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, MEXICO, PUERTO RICO, VIETNAM, SOUTH KOREA, TAIWAN, THAILAND, Chicago, IL, CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Cleveland, OH, JAPAN, FRANCE, ZIMBABWE, New York (NY)

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

The Role of the Church

New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, INDIA, INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

March on Washington

Sunday, April 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Little Rock, AR, North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), New York, NY, Missouri (MO)

In this news release, Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, addresses Congress to voice the people's concern in their quest for freedom, jobs and equal rights. He commends Republicans and Democrats in support of legislation to end discrimination.

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, January 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C.

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

HUNGARY, Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

SCLC Resolution on 1966 Civil Rights Act

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

At its Tenth Annual Convention, the SCLC Board adopts a resolution calling upon President Johnson and Congress to reverse a vote on Title IV (Open Housing) of the Civil Rights Act of 1966 that effectively permits discrimination in the sale or rental of private housing. It also faults the Administration for failure to enforce Title VI (Ban on Federal Funds for Segregated Programs and Schools) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and for inadequate appointment of voter examiners under the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

MLK Addresses the Atlanta Press Club

Wednesday, November 10, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King discusses the struggle for racial justice and the concept of goodwill with the Atlanta Press Club. He stresses that any opposition in the fight for equality will inevitably fail in the face of a unified effort across America.

A Journey of Conscience

VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Washington, D.C., SOUTH AFRICA, ALGERIA

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

Monday, August 8, 1966
Massachusetts (MA), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Dr. King introduces Senator Edward M. Kennedy at a SCLC banquet and highlights his accomplishments.

MLK Memorandum: Plans for Selma, Alabama

Tuesday, January 19, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King outlines his plan for civil rights goals in Selma, Alabama.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

"The American Dream"

Tuesday, June 6, 1961
New York (NY), Washington (WA), INDIA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), SPAIN, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA

This transcription of the commencement address delivered by Dr. King at Lincoln University on June 6 1961.

Accepting the New York City Medallion Draft

NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King accepts the New York City Medallion on behalf of all persons, both black and white, involved in the fight for social justice and equality.

The Law and Civil Disobedience

Tuesday, August 23, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Connecticut (CT), London, England, Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), UNITED KINGDOM

Harris Wofford, a law professor and member of Senator John F. Kennedy's staff, discusses civil disobedience and its relationship to the law at the student association of Notre Dame Law School. He advocates in favor of civil disobedience using the theories of Thoreau, Socrates, Gandhi and others to support the need to break unjust laws. Dr. King pens handwritten questions on the top of this document pertaining to the changing of unjust laws in the courts.

MLK Urges the Vice President to Visit the South

Thursday, June 13, 1957

Dr. King informs the press that he is articulating plans with the SCLC to launch a campaign to prepare the Negro community for the 1958 election. Dr. King appeals to Vice President Richard Nixon to perform three duties to aid the practice of justice and freedom in the United States. The first of the three involves personal appearances of Nixon to speak to the people of the South about civil rights. The second duty asserts Nixon's initiation of the United States Constitution to support the Negro's voting rights.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

The Modern Negro Activist

Montgomery, AL, GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Alabama (AL), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Address to the National Bar Association

Thursday, August 20, 1959
Wisconsin (WI), Milwaukee, WI, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Little Rock, AR, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Tuesday, October 16, 1956
New York (NY)

In this early speech to a NY Universalists' convention, Dr. King lays out his nonviolence method, based on Gandhi's. He outlines five of the six principles he will use later. They are: active, courageous resistance; winning the moral conversion of the opponent, not defeating him; attacking the forces of evil, rather than the persons doing evil; using love to avoid "internal violence of the spirit"; and faith in the inclination of the universe towards justice.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965
Alabama (AL), Baltimore, MD, Montgomery, AL, GERMANY, Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Marion, AK, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

House Un-American Activities Committee

Friday, May 15, 1964
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Mississippi (MS), New Orleans, LA

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955
New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ, Washington, D.C.

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, LUXEMBOURG, FRANCE

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.