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"Speeches"

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Illinois (IL), New York (NY)

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Draft of Speech for SCLC in Nashville

Nashville, TN

Dr. King is outlining a speech he later presented to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Nashville.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, LUXEMBOURG, FRANCE

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS)

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

SCLC Press Release About Telegram to Robert Kennedy

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Greenwood, MS

The SCLC issues a press release, which discloses the text of telegram from Dr. King to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Tuesday, July 7, 1964
San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA), Jackson, MS, New York (NY), New York, NY, Maryland (MD), SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, CUBA, Louisiana (LA)

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, EGYPT, ISRAEL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA, CUBA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Friday, April 30, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH AFRICA, BELGIUM, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, MEXICO, PUERTO RICO, VIETNAM, SOUTH KOREA, TAIWAN, THAILAND, Chicago, IL, CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Cleveland, OH, JAPAN, FRANCE, ZIMBABWE, New York (NY)

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Philadelphia, MS, Montgomery, AL, Oslo, Norway, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL)

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

A Journey of Conscience

VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Washington, D.C., SOUTH AFRICA, ALGERIA

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, South Africa, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966
Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

Thursday, May 28, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, INDIA, INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

MLK on the Republican Nomination of Barry Goldwater

Thursday, July 16, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King issued this statement regarding the "unfortunate and disastrous" Republican Party's nomination of Senator Barry Goldwater for the Presidency of the United States. The Reverend expounds on his disapproval of the nomination by stating that he represents an unrealistic conservation that is totally out of touch with the realities of the twentieth century.

Draft of MLK Response to the Establishment of a Bi-Racial Commission in Saint Augustine, Florida

Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

This is a draft of a response for Dr. King to make regarding the establishment of a bi-racial commission in St. Augustine, Florida to address the issues of equality, human dignity and racial justice.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, PUERTO RICO

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Retirement Speech from MLK to Dr. Benjamin E. May

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King honors Dr. Mays for serving as the President of Morehouse College as he enters into retirement.

Calvin Kytle to Head Information Center for Urban America

Washington, D.C., New York, NY, GEORGIA

This press release revelas that Calvin Kytle will head a new national information center for Urban American, Inc.

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Ebenezer Church Bulletin and President Kennedy's Eulogy

Sunday, November 24, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This is an Ebenezer Baptist Church bulletin expressing appreciation for the congregation's various acts of kindness toward one another. On the opposite side of the bulletin, an outline can be found for a memorial speech for the late President Kennedy.

Statement Regarding the Passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964

Dr. King gives a brief statement regarding the importance of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964.

Movement for Puerto Rican Independence

VIETNAM, PHILIPPINES, CUBA, PUERTO RICO, NICARAGUA, CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH KOREA

Pedro Juan Rua, a leader in the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, gives a speech concerning the American military presence in Vietnam. He provides a historical framework for understanding America's involvement with other oppressed nations, asserting "U.S. rulers are new Nazis. Unite to defeat them."