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"Correspondence"

Letter from Imogene Cashmore to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Imogene Cashmore responds to Senator Dodd's recent statement in Congress about Moise Tshombe, a Congo politician who had recently been jailed on charges of treason. Cashmore condemns Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy for not trying to help Tshombe, questioning why there has been no negative response to the current government of Congo, which Cashmore charges is rampant with "mass murder and violation of civil rights."

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

This letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton request the Leeds & Northrup Foundation provide a grant to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Chauncey Eskridge includes a tax exempt letter and a copy of the trust instrument outlining the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Both Dr. King and Mr. Bernard Jackson received a copy of this letter.

Letter from Ms. McDonald to Ms. Elinor G. Galusha

Thursday, October 27, 1966

In this letter dated October 28, 1966, Ms. McDonald tells Ms. Galusha that she may use an excerpt from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."

Letter from Whitey the Honkey to MLK

The author stresses that Dr. King is a part of the race problem. They offer numerous political suggestions and concludes that Dr. King should simply mind his own personal matters.

Letter from MLK to Robert L. Pino

Thursday, November 29, 1962

Dr. King writes to newly appointed Chairman of the Civil Rights Committee of New York Local Union 2603, Robert Pino, regarding the first anniversary of the Albany Movement.

Letter from Josephine Davis to Dr. King

Friday, June 24, 1966

In this letter, Josephine Davis tells Dr. King that they enjoyed the evening he spent with them. She then informs him that their prayers are with him and that he can look forward to financial help from "THOSE".

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Letter from Lottie Thomas to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Lottie Thomas, a Negro businesswoman from Alaska, requests Dr. King's help with her business. Mrs. Thomas informs Dr. King of the unjust treatment she has endured in Alaska and of her current financial tribulations.

Letter from MLK to Linda Houser

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King writes this letter to Linda Houser of Ursulin Academy regarding the studies that cultivated her involvement in the "struggle for social justice in America."

Letter to Dora McDonald from Harper & Row, Publishers

Wednesday, October 24, 1962

The secretary of Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, sent this correspondence to Dr. King secretary, Miss. Dora McDonald. The content of the letter thanked Miss. McDonald, for sending a previous letter and requested additional chapters for Dr. King's second book. The book was entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Mercedes L. Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Nine year old Mercedes Lynne Johnson writes Mrs. King to offer her condolences and prayers following the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. Edna E. Williams to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

Mrs. Edna E. Williams invites Dr. King to attend The Friendship Baptist Church's annual Harry W. Knight Award and Mortgage Retirement Fund Banquet.

Letter from Richard Clemence to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Richard Clemence, a white Air Force officer, thanks Dr. King for his service to the nation in bringing people together. Clemence wrtes that "your steady guiding hand and spirit have led many to see the light of moral right."

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, October 29, 1965

Dr. Mays writes to Dr. King regarding the new statement of purpose for Morehouse College.

A Born Again Christian writes MLK

The author of this letter, signed "Born Again Christian," urges Dr. King to set his ministry more on God rather than participating in civil rights demonstrations.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Letter from Morehouse College President to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966

Morehouse College President Dr. Benjamin E. Mays appeals to Dr. King to contribute to the school on the occasion of the college?s 100th anniversary.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Thomson, a representative of the Canadian Friends' Service Committee, invites Dr. King to participate in a week-long conference held in Toronto, Ontario. The event will consist of diplomats from all over the world.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Supporters

Ralph Abernathy, Treasurer of the SCLC, informs SCLC supporters of Dr. King's newly published book, "Strength To Love." He explains that Dr. King has assigned a large portion of the royalties to further the work of the SCLC and urges supporters to order the book.

Postcard from Carl S. to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

The sender of this postcard informs Dr. King that he supports King's planned trips to Colorado and California.

Letter from MLK to Claes Collenberg

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere appreciation to Claes Collenberg of Sweden for his help in raising money to assist with the civil rights movement in America. He conveys to Mr. Collenberg that he will be notified of updates involving the Chicago Campaign on housing.

United States National Student Association Scope Questionnaire

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

The United States National Student Association prepares to publish the second edition of SCOPE, a directory of community service projects in which students can become involved during the summer months. A questionnaire is enclosed for organizations interested in listing their program.

Letter from Randolph Blackwell to Greene, Ayers, Swigert & Cluster

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell responds to the gentlemen of Greene, Ayers, Swiger & Cluster concerning a previous issue.

Letter from H. D. Everett to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

A proposition letter expressing an economic idea to establish business enterprises owned and operated by negroes.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Concert

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to attend a concert celebrating the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. The concert features Mischa Elman, a Russian emigre and famed musician.

Postcard From Jesse Jackson to MLK

Jesse Jackson doubts that Dr. King will be able to bring God to Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Hazel Olivier to MLK

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Hazel H. Olivier of Chicago, in a letter dated February 1, 1966, asks Dr. King to help her retain an apartment building on Yale Avenue that she purchased in 1957. She lived there 5 years before being told there were serious violations. Three years after spending substantial funds and being informed by the inspector that everything was in compliance, she was cited with additional violations and told there were no reports of her earlier remedial actions. She wonders how the previous white owner was permitted to sell if there were violations. Mrs.

Letter from Ralph Saylor to MLK

Mr. Saylor assures Dr. King that he still has the support of the white community regardless of his stance on the Vietnam War.