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"Correspondence"

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from Walter G. Pietsch to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Walter G. Peitsch asks Dr. King to support a resolution to reinstate Adam Clayton Powell to his seat in the United States House of Representatives and his Chairmanship of the United States Committee on Education and Labor.

Letter from Mr. Ossie Davis to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Mr. Ossie Davis suggests to Dr. King that a tribute be prepared to honor the life of Dr. W. E. B. DuBois. Mr. Davis then asks Dr. King for his assistance in gaining sponsorship from "distinguished men and women."

Letter from Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker to the Honorable Harold E. Stassen

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker requests that the Honorable Harold E. Stassen, of the American Baptist Convention, contribute a commentary on Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Thomas Hejzlar to MLK

Friday, December 1, 1967

Student Thomas Hejzlar of Czechoslovakia writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph. He includes a postcard for Dr. King to sign and return.

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

Letter from Hosea Williams to MLK

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

Hosea Williams submits his resignation as a staff member of the SCLC. He also requests a meeting with the Steering Committee and Dr. King to discuss unfinished items related to the SCLC.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 27, 1964

Joan Daves sends three checks to Dr. King. The first check is an advance due from Harper and Row, the second represents an advance from NAL and the third is a partial payment from "Life."

Letter from The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967

A member of The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge in Milwaukee informs Dr. King of his study on the Negro voter. The study determined that Mississippi has the most non-registered Negro voters.

Letter from John R. Loch to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

John R. Loch, Director of the Student Union at the University of Pittsburgh, thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Public Affairs Committee for his visit to the University. He also encloses a copy of the "Pitt News" that reported his visit.

Letter from Robert L. Martin to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964

Dr. Robert L. Martin, Associate Professor of History at Texas Christian University, invites Dr. King to come speak to the university.

Netherlands Request Autograph

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Theo Roling, of The Netherlands, urges Dr. King to promote peace in the world. He requests Dr. King's signature for his Nobel Prize autograph collection.

Letter from Alice McBee to MLK

Wednesday, September 7, 1966

Alice McBee expresses her admiration for Dr. King and dedicates two of her poems to the King family.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Watts

Monday, January 15, 1968

Dr. King thanks Mr. Watts for taking the time to express his support for King's efforts.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Letter From Walter R. McCall to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

Morehouse School of Religion Director Walter McCall asks Dr. King for a contribution to purchase a piano that will be presented to Morehouse School of Religion.

Letter from Melvin D. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Melvin D. Kennedy, Editor at Morehouse College, writes Dr. King about the book, "Perspectives in Freedom and Progress, 1863-1963: An appraisal of the Negro's First Hundred Years of Freedom." He explains that the book is a non-profit venture that will add to the Negro narrative and highlight Negro accomplishments. He goes on to request that Dr. King contribute a chapter about the Negro's fight for freedom.

Letter form Dorothy Leeper to Muhammad Ali

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dorothy Leeper thanks Muhammad Ali for his courage in standing by his beliefs. She also commends him and Dr. King for their stance against the Vietnam War.

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from Govenor Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller encloses a copy of "The Future of Federalism." His book "traces the development of the federal idea in the United States."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Letter from MLK to Willie Faust

Saturday, March 31, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from Willie Gate Faust regarding an inquiry pertaining to legal advice and his release from jail. Reverend King refers the inmate to Attorney Donald Lee Hollowell, counsel for the NAACP.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the US Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in response to a joint telegram concerning an investigation in Lee County, Georgia.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Mary Bonaventure

The author writes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy to express how impressed she was with the events surrounding Dr. King's funeral. She also made a lengthy request for mementos of the funeral service and Dr. King's speeches.

Letter from Norman Taylor to MLK

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Norman Taylor, an agent at Investment Bonds, Inc., commends Dr. King on his work and for being a man of integrity. He offers assistance to help improve the living conditions of the poor in the slums of Chicago.

Letter from J.Campe to MLK regarding Book Royalties

Friday, May 19, 1967

This financial document references earnings from the Japanese editions of Dr. King's books, "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Why We Can't Wait."