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"Telegrams"

Telegram from MLK to Robert L. Leggett

Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, King urges the House of Representatives to please vote passage demonstration cities for the sake of civil peace.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan Jackson

Selma, AL

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan in the passing of Mrs. Portlock. The King's highlight Mrs. Portlock's positive attributes and her great inspirational influence.

Telegram from Chaim Potok to Andrew J. Young

Tuesday, May 11, 1965
New York, NY

Reverend Andrew J. Young informs Rabbi Chaim Potok that his heavy involvement in the South will not permit him to engage in any writing.

Telegram from Al Duckett to MLK

Saturday, July 9, 1966
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this telegram to Dr. King, Mr. Al Duckett professes his willingness to protest in Chicago.

Telegram from George Houser to MLK

Thursday, November 11, 1965
New York, NY

George Houser of the American Committee on Africa urges Dr. King to telegram the President about Rhodesia's unilateral declaration of independence. The Rhodesian government, under Prime Minister Ian Smith, took this illegal action to break from the United Kingdom after days of negotiation with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson. The British sought to give blacks a fair share of power.

Telegram From the National Committee For Free Elections to MLK Regarding 1967 Sunflower County, Mississippi Elections

New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General William Ramsey Clark, to discuss the need for federal voting registrars to oversee upcoming elections in rural Mississippi counties. In these elections, Negroes will run as candidates for the first time in American history.

Telegram from Dr. F. Earl McLendon to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. McLendon, President of the Atlanta Medical Association, offers aid to Dr. King and the people of Selma, Alabama after incidents of police brutality.

Telegram from MLK to President Lyndon B. Johnson

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to conduct a full investigation concerning the government's involvement with Medgar Evers' suspected murderer.

Telegram from Unius Griffin to MLK

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

Unius Griffin writes to Dr. King regarding four Negro political candidates seeking elective offices in Wilcox County, Alabama. Griffin includes information on the increasing numbers of registered Negro voters and speaks to the various intents of each Negro candidate.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967
New York, NY

Rodney Clurman requests that Dr. King attend a ten-day trip supporting various people and organizations.

Telegram From Mrs. Mary Kru to MLK

Saturday, March 12, 1966
Illinois (IL)

In this telegram, Mrs. Mary Kru writes to Dr. King, "your plans of operation put me out of work".

Telegram from MLK and Joseph Lowery to William Anderson

Detroit, MI, Washington, D.C.

Joseph E. Lowery and Dr. King addressed this telegram to William Anderson asking him to attend a SCLC board meeting regarding the Poor People's Campaign.

Telegram from George W. Baber and John W. P. Collier to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), New York, NY

The African Methodist Episcopal Churches in New Jersey express their pleasure that Dr. King is making a "speedy recovery."

Telegram from Wyatt T. Walker to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Wyatt T. Walker confirms his attendance at a meeting with President Kennedy at the White House.

Telegram from Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz offer their encouragement to Dr. King.

Telegram from Robert M. Ball to MLK

Monday, February 7, 1966
Baltimore, MD, Atlanta, GA

Mr.Ball, Social Security Administration Commissioner, invites Dr. King to participate in an information session concerning a proposed medicare program. The meeting will be held in Baltimore, MD.

Telegram from University of Michigan Young Republican Club to MLK

Michigan (MI), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

The University of Michigan Young Republican Club informs Dr. King that they "deplore" the recent events in Selma, Alabama.

Western Union Telegram Sent to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Richard Charles Boone 1965

Friday, November 5, 1965
Texas (TX)

Richard Charles Boone sent Dr. King this 1965 telegram informing him of possible racial hostility in Miami between the black community and Cuban immigrants moving into the city.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965
Washington (WA), CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

Telegram from Elizabeth Polste to MLK

Wednesday, December 28, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. Polste writes to Dr. King requesting a tribute for Emily Greene, who is also a Noble Peace Laureate and a founder of the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom.

Telegram from SANE Co-Chair Benjamin Spock to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Boston, MA

Dr. Benjamin Spock, acting as co-chairman of the National Committe for a Sane Nuclear Policy, transmits a telegram to Dr. King inviting him to deliver a speech at Madison Square Garden in reference to Vietnam.

Telegram from Frederick Dennard to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Reverend Frederick Dennard, Executive Director of the Harlem Interfaith Counseling Service, invites Dr. King to speak at a fundraising banquet.

Telegram from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King offers words of encouragement to Adam Clayton Powell during the loss of his seat and chairmanship in Congress.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Tuesday, March 31, 1964
North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., Boston, MA

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

Telegram from Marvin Rich to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Marvin Rich informs Dr. King of a resolution that was adopted at a recent conference. The resolution called for a summit of civil rights leaders.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966
New York, NY

Mr. Wilkins, Chairman of the Call Committee, writes to assure Dr. King's participation in an upcoming conference. Worldwide interest is developing and Dr. King's presence and leadership is very important.

Telegram from Dr. Robert Green to MLK

Monday, September 12, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Robert L. Green, Executive Director of Friends of SNCC Los Angeles, criticizes recent remarks made by the SCLC regarding his organization. Dr. Green also advises Dr. King that the SCLC should not comment on SNCC, if the SCLC cannot say something positive.

Telegram from C.K. Steele to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960
Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Rev. Steele expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's career and assures Dr. King that he is not walking alone.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.