Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"Telegrams"

Telegram from Marion Barry and Edward Biking to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee extends gratitude to Dr. King for his deep commitment to the concept of nonviolence and a free society while he is incarcerated in the Dekalb County Jail.

Telegram to Dr. King about Vietnam

Monday, April 10, 1967

The Magee Volunteers for International Developement have communicated with Dr. King regarding the international projects within Vietnam.

Telegram from Russell Tuten to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Russell Tuten writes Dr. King expressing his support in extending Voting Rights and complete citizenship to all Georgia residents. Tuten states, "Georgia should be commended for its progress in conforming to the laws of the land."

Telegram to MLK from 347 AFL-CIO Armours Lard Refinery Workers

The Local 347 of the AFL-CIO sent this Western Union Telegram to Dr. King as an expression of their hopes for his recovery, during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Sunday, March 11, 1962

Dr. and Mrs. King congratulate Reverend Ralph Abernathy on his birthday.

Telegram from Richard Daley to Dr. King Requesting Meeting

Chicago Mayor Richard Daley invites Dr. King to meet with him and other religious leaders to discuss programs that will improve the quality of life in Chicago.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Moreland Griffith Smith

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Andrew Young informs Moreland Griffith Smith Sr. that he will be unable to attend a meeting in Montgomery, Alabama. Reverend James Bevel will attend the meeting instead.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Saturday, June 1, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, informs Dr. King that President Kennedy is unable to meet on the suggested days due to his travels.

Telegram from the New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action wishes Dr. King well in his recovery.

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

Telegram from Mike Bibler to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Mike Bibler contends that "our lame duck president" can "do more for black people than any other man in history." This telegram was sent following President Johnson's announcement that he would not seek re-election.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Mr. Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend a meeting with Dr. K. O. Mbadiwe, former Nigerian Minister, and other Negro leaders in the United States to discuss the increasing conflict in Nigeria.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Monday, September 11, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Mr. E. M. Bettenson from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne of a date that Dr. King will be available to receive an Honorary Degree.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Telegram from L. V. Booth and Otis Moss to MLK

Dr. L. V. Booth and Reverend Otis Moss thank Dr. King and the SCLC for their efforts during the last ten years.

Telegram from MLK to Fred Shuttlesworth

Dr. King provides support and encouragement to Rev. Shuttlesworth.

Telegram from MLK to Cesar Chavez

Dr. King commends Cesar Chavez for his personal sacrifice and commitment to the use of nonviolence as a way to achieve justice.

Telegram from President Johnson to MLK

Thursday, June 23, 1966

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Dr. King sympathizing with his concern over the incidents that occurred in Philadelphia, Mississippi. King was continuing the March Against Fear of James Meredith, who was shot by a sniper on June 6. A rally in Philadelphia commemorating the murder two years earlier of three civil rights activists was angrily attacked by a white mob. Homes of blacks were later sprayed with gunfire.

Telegram from Charles Evers to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This telegram, from board members of MAP, expresses their dissatisfaction with Dr. King's comments regarding refunding efforts of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Telegram from Al C. Hastings to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Al Hastings expresses his concern during Dr. King's incarceration in the Jefferson County Jail.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Memphis Sanitation Workers' to MLK

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Members of the Memphis Sanitation Workers' Strike express an urgent need for Dr. King to travel to Memphis in order to aid them in their crusade.

Support from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Mr. Taylor expresses his disappointment in the City of Atlanta's decision to arrest Dr. King along with 14 other individuals.

Telegram from Dr. Albert Davis to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Dr. Albert Davis and the Atlanta Chapter of the NAACP praise Dr. King for his "continued leadership and revolutionary ideas."

Western Union Telegram from James McDaniel to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Mr. McDaniel invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the executive committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. Lovie M. Lowe

Monday, August 23, 1965

Dr. King attempts to mediate between Mrs. Lowe and her pastor, the Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth.

Telegram from Arnold Aronson to MLK

Arnold Aronson requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights endorsing the anti-poverty bill.