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People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Goldwater's Nomination

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), West Virginia (WV), Birmingham, AL, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967
California (CA)

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

Saturday, July 13, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Oklahoma (OK), Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY)

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Brooklyn, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

Amsterdam News Article by MLK About European Tour

Thursday, September 17, 1964
Berlin, Germany, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King recalls an address he gave at the Berlin Arts Festival, where he witnessed an enthusiastic crowd. The crowd's interest confirmed his belief "that the Negro is now in a position to lead the world." He also mentions the Christians of East Berlin, who, though Communists, maintain their faith in God.

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, New Jersey (NJ), Connecticut (CT), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Massachusetts (MA), Indiana (IN)

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

New York, NY, Chicago, IL

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

James Meredith Article

Mississippi (MS)

A newspaper article describes an argument that occurred between James Meredith and a group of black deacons in the city of Canton, Miss. The argument ultimately led to Meredith stating "I can understand why so many Negroes have been lynched."

Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly: A Voice for Harlem

Monday, July 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN), New York (NY), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dan Griffin forwards this letter to Dr. King with an enclosure of a magazine from Ave Marie, entitled "A Voice for Harlem." The magazine includes several topics such as hunger in the United States, the War in Vietnam, and worship in the Soviet Union.

Newspaper Article: "Giving Away a Library"

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Chicago, IL

This Chicago's Sunday AMERICAN newspaper article discusses the issue concerning the decision of the Chicago Law Institute to give the government their legal library without the consent of the membership.

Nonviolent Leaders

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

In this article, written by Robert L. Powers, the author gives his assessment of the book "Why We Can't Wait." Powers provided poignant excerpts from the literature.

Los Angeles Times: Prophetic Talk of Dr. King

Tuesday, April 16, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Carl Greenberg, Political Editor for the Los Angeles Times, wrote this editorial about Dr. King's final trip to California and his opinion on the 1968 Presidential Campaign. Mr. Greenberg describes Dr. King's assessment of the war on poverty, the 1968 Democratic National Convention and possible support for Eugene McCarthy or Robert Kennedy.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Saturday, February 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

Tuesday, November 23, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967
New York (NY), NIGERIA

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

"Insight and Outlook..Negro Road to Power"

New York, NY, VIETNAM, Cleveland, OH, Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Joseph Kraft discusses the influences of Blacks voting.

How Do You View the Progress in School Desegregation?

New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Lowndes County, AL, Philadelphia, MS

In this special for the New York Times, Dr. King shares his opinion on the progress made in desegregating schools.

The Spirit of Kinloch

Missouri (MO)

The Spirit of Kinloch is a community newspaper with various articles. Kinloch is the oldest African American community to be incorporated in the state of Missouri.

Amsterdam Article

Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Philadelphia, MS, Jackson, MS, Greenwood, MS

This document describes the fight for civil rights in Mississippi in the early 1960's.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

Washington, D.C., California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Indiana (IN), Missouri (MO), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Minnesota (MN), Washington (WA), San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, CUBA, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

WRAL- TV Broadcast Transcript of Viewpoint show

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

WRAL-TV Viewpoint #1790 is a critical review of the efforts of Stokely Carmichael and Dr. King. The speaker claims Dr. King uses the threat of riots in cities to blackmail the United States Congress into doing the bidding of the Black Power Movement.