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Integrating Elementary Schools in Berkeley

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), New Jersey (NJ)

This article details the integration of several Berkeley area elementary schools. The Presidents of each school give feedback regarding the public's response and their plans on how they will proceed.

The Boycott Explained

Saturday, April 10, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes this article in the form of questions and answers to explain the purpose and impact of an upcoming boycott in Alabama.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

CHINA, INDIA, JAPAN, New Delhi, India, New York, NY, SOUTH KOREA, TAIWAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), RUSSIAN FEDERATION

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

Wilkins Praises Darien Teacher Exchange Setup

Friday, December 11, 1964
New York, NY, Missouri (MO), Connecticut (CT)

Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, applauds Darien's efforts to integrate minority and suburban communities through its exchange program with New York City. The program "sought Negro teachers, business and professional people to live and work in their community."

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Should F.E.P.C. Become a Federal Law?

In this draft article Dr. King discusses employment discrimination and the need for the Fair Employment Practices Commission to become legislation.

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958
Philadelphia, PA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

People in Action: Albany Justice

CUBA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Rep. Powell Unseating to Stick?

Tuesday, March 7, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

This article discusses public opinion surrounding former U.S. House Representative Adam Clayton Powell's ethics investigation, and subsequent ousting from office.

Bayard Rustin: Goals and Strategies

Thursday, August 20, 1964
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Maine (ME)

In this speech, given before Bowdoin College in 1964, Bayard Rustin outlines the basis of civil rights issues currently being fought for. He argues that man must come together as one and face the problem with our society, and that African Americans see the problems with society more than other races because they are struggling to bring civil rights and social change to all.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Inquirer: "Not Accepting White Help Black Power Weakness"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Atlanta Inquirer released this review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review highlighted important issues transcribed in Dr. King's book. The most important issue, highlighted in the review, involved his views on the conflicts of the black power movement. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was released in 1967.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Saturday, March 3, 1962
Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), INDIA, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

Chicago Daily News: Operation Breadbasket

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL

The Chicago Daily News posts an article highlighting Operation Breadbaskets success in opening up two hundred and twenty four jobs in Chicago's dairy industry for Negroes.

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

Friday, December 3, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

Mississippi (MS), California (CA), New York, NY, JAMAICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, CANADA, Virginia (VA), New Jersey (NJ), Indiana (IN)

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Oregon (OR)

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

5th Company Gives in to Breadbasket Demands for Jobs

Chicago, IL

The author writes about how operation breadbasket completed successful negotiations for new jobs for Negroes within the Chicago dairy industry.

Article Regarding New Head Start Project

Mississippi (MS), New York (NY)

Head Start is Shifted to College and Politics Behind OEO's Cutoffs.The two articles depicted provide details on the relationship between the Office of Economic Opportunity and the funds being cut off from the Child Development Group to be given to a small Mississippi college.

The Cartoonist's View: Make Gains In St. Augustine

Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), St. Augustine, FL

This column features news on "gains in St. Augustine," and quotations from various sources on civil rights issues.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington (WA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), CANADA, San Francisco, CA, ITALY, Detroit, MI, Delaware (DE), Louisville, KY, SOUTH KOREA, Washington, D.C., KENYA, Tennessee (TN)

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

The Martin Luther King Column

New York (NY), Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband Lucius on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."