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"Articles"

President's Committee on Government Contracts

In 1953 President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the President's Committee on Government Contracts. This organization was created to ensure anti-discrimination compliance with any organizations affiliated with government contracts. This report highlights "Five Years of Progress" within the organization.

Malcolm X Trio Still Marking Time Waiting for Trial

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

This article documents the legal aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X on February 21, 1965. It also discusses the three men accused of the killing and reports comments made by the lawyers involved in the case.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

Featured in this Western Christian Leadership Conference newsletter, is an article by Junius Griffin regarding the SCLC. "SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama," describes the reasons and the situations in which the SCLC had to "use the nonviolent economic campaign as an expression of moral indignation and an appeal to the nation's conscience."

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

Long Beach Dispatch: American Talking Back

In this letter to the editor, Mr. Joseph Holmes uses rhetorical questions and graphic imagery to illustrate respective positions on the Vietnam War.

Daily News: NAACP Anti-South Propaganda Article

Thursday, March 5, 1959

The author writes about a secret meeting that was held at the NAACP's headquarters regarding race identification.

Dr. MLK and the American Dream

The article talks about Dr.King addressing the issue of racial imbalance in Boston public schools. Dr. King expresses his opinion that "racial segregation is politically unsound and relegates persons to the status of things, stigmatizing persons of color as untouchables in a caste system.

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

The Jerusalem Post: Martin Luther King's Jewish Associations

Thursday, October 22, 1964

In this article, Dr. Israel Goldstein describes the friendship between Dr. King and the American Jewish Congress, including the degree of Jewish participation in Dr. King's 1963 March on Washington.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

A Letter to Meredith

Thursday, March 14, 1963

In "A Letter To Meredith" Dr. King discusses the challenges faced by James Meredith as a student at the University of Mississippi. -

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

The American Jewish Committee

Friday, March 1, 1968

The American Jewish Committee reports on two projects recommended by the Kerner Commission to address "the imbalance between white and Negro in America."

Dairy Agrees to Double Number of Negro Workers

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Operation Breadbasket shares an article on the organization's letterhead, which appeared in the Chicago Sun-times. The article highlights the end of a boycott after Mellody Dairy announces a decision to more than double its Negro employees.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Organize Voter Registration in North

Dr. King discusses the gap in black and white voters across the US,specifically in the North. King organizes speeches and a tour across Northern cities to get blacks registered to vote.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Commentary on MLK Article

This article describes Dr. King's approval of a recent civil rights ordinance passing in Gary, Indiana. The purpose of the ordinance is to prohibit discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing or financing of real estate. Dr. King thanks the community and members of the City Council for making the ordinance possible.