Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Articles"

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

The Advances of Operation Breadbasket

Monday, December 5, 1966

This document displays two articles that report on the progress made by "Operation Breadbasket" in Chicago. The first article discusses SCLC's negotiations with High-Low Foods, a Chicago chain that agreed to implement business practices that would serve "Negro-owned" businesses in the community and increase black employment in the company. The second article highlights similar negotiations carried out with National Tea Co., another Chicago based business. Civil Rights leaders Jesse Jackson and Rev.

Look Magazine: Can Johnson Win His Other War?

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Vietnam and the Conscience of U.S.A.

Monday, May 1, 1967

The author argues that the U.S. is fighting a false bogey of international communism in Vietnam at the expense of Great Society programs at home.

SCLC Tour of Northern Cities

Dr. King announces an SCLC tour of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Washington, DC. He cites the wish to establish communication with people in the black ghettos of northern cities and to assist local leadership in taking movement issues into their communities. He mentions the moral and material support provided by northern allies for the southern struggle and a time to reciprocate.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

In 1953 President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the President's Committee on Government Contracts. This organization was created to ensure anti-discrimination compliance with any organizations affiliated with government contracts. This report highlights "Five Years of Progress" within the organization.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Diary in Jail

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.

Chicago Daily News: Operation Breadbasket

Monday, August 8, 1966

The Chicago Daily News posts an article highlighting Operation Breadbaskets success in opening up two hundred and twenty four jobs in Chicago's dairy industry for Negroes.

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

Featured in this Western Christian Leadership Conference newsletter, is an article by Junius Griffin regarding the SCLC. "SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama," describes the reasons and the situations in which the SCLC had to "use the nonviolent economic campaign as an expression of moral indignation and an appeal to the nation's conscience."

The Burning Truth in the South

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Newspaper Clippings on Vietnam, January 1968

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

This document is a collage of newspaper clippings from the New York Time and the Washington Post on union leaders' positions on Vietnam. The boxed quotation is excerpted from a recent AFL-CIO convention.

The Christian Century: Civil Rights Bill Move to Fore

Wednesday, June 5, 1957

The Christian Century expounds on the advancement of the Civil Rights Bill in the United States. The article highlights Dr. King as a "prophetic Christian leader" and details the Negros who assembled for the March on Washington. The author lists numerous reasons correlating the positive affect of allowing Negro's the right to vote.

SCLC News Release on Voter Registration

Monday, February 19, 1962

This press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference describes Dr. King's prediction that many African-Americans would register to vote in the upcoming election. Dr. King also remarks that President Kennedy "has not lived up to his civil rights campaign promises."

Editorial- "Lawlessness Means Bloodshed, End of Dreams"

In this article, light heavy-weight boxing champion Archie Moore discourages black Americans from resorting to "lawlessness" in their attempts to advance the cause of civil rights.

The Martin Luther King Column (2)

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband, Lucius, on behalf of the civil rights movement.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1963

This issue of the SCLC Newsletter covers the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The publication features a number of photographs, editorials and the full text of Dr. King's Washington address.

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

Thursday, April 6, 1967

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK's Column on Jackie Robinson's Induction in Hall of Fame

Saturday, August 4, 1962

In this column from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King echoes his speech at the induction of Jackie Robinson into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Robinson not only broke the color barrier in major league baseball, MLK points out, he succeeded in business. MLK lauds Robinson's truth-telling as he spoke out against discrimination in the north and south, by whites and blacks, and on racial and religious grounds.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Newspaper Submissions on Race from U.S. Soldiers

This newspaper clipping features two submissions from U.S. Soldiers, both concerning racial issues.

The Gary Crusader: The World of Books

Saturday, June 24, 1967

This review of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" highlights his examination of the Black Power movement as well as his emphasis on non-violence.