Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Articles"

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

Should F.E.P.C. Become a Federal Law?

In this draft article Dr. King discusses employment discrimination and the need for the Fair Employment Practices Commission to become legislation.

The Jackie Robinson Saga

This brief biographical sketch highlights Jackie Robinson's life and his accomplishments as a baseball player, Army Lieutenant and business executive.

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

Advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 25, 1964

Under the Additional Listings section of this magazine is a review about Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Alabama Council Newsletter

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Inquirer: "Not Accepting White Help Black Power Weakness"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Atlanta Inquirer released this review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review highlighted important issues transcribed in Dr. King's book. The most important issue, highlighted in the review, involved his views on the conflicts of the black power movement. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was released in 1967.

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

CEP News

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

University of Mississippi at Oxford Crisis

Dr. King discusses the Mississippi crisis after the admittance of James Meredith into the local University.

King Finds New Target

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

"Dr. King Outdated"

Saturday, July 15, 1967

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

People in Action: Most Abused Man in Nation

Saturday, March 31, 1962

This article by Dr. King, published in his "People in Action" series in the New York Amsterdam News, describes the national and local reaction to the Birmingham jailing of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and J. S. Phifer.

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

Monday, January 23, 1967

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Monday, July 27, 1964

Presented here, is a draft of an article published in the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC Newsletter. The article highlights the discontentment of the author in relation to acts of violence against Jewish citizens.

400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

Dr. King describes the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference involvement in the civil rights campaign, May-July of 1964, in St. Augustine, Florida. The excerpted article is taken from the SCLC Newsletter.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

MLK to Preach at University of the West Indies

Friday, May 28, 1965

The Daily Gleaner in Jamaica reported that Dr. King was scheduled to preach the valedictory sermon at the Chapel of the University of the West Indies.