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Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964
New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), New York, NY

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

Bayard Rustin: Goals and Strategies

Thursday, August 20, 1964
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Maine (ME)

In this speech, given before Bowdoin College in 1964, Bayard Rustin outlines the basis of civil rights issues currently being fought for. He argues that man must come together as one and face the problem with our society, and that African Americans see the problems with society more than other races because they are struggling to bring civil rights and social change to all.

Washington D. C. Star: Negro Lawyer Pushing Town Incorporation Plan

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Congressman John Conyers shares an article with civil rights attorney, Orzell Billingsley. The article highlights Attorney Billingsley's efforts to join 20 predominately black municipalities, so that more African Americans can have a voice within politics and economic development.

Los Angeles Times: Prophetic Talk of Dr. King

Tuesday, April 16, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Carl Greenberg, Political Editor for the Los Angeles Times, wrote this editorial about Dr. King's final trip to California and his opinion on the 1968 Presidential Campaign. Mr. Greenberg describes Dr. King's assessment of the war on poverty, the 1968 Democratic National Convention and possible support for Eugene McCarthy or Robert Kennedy.

Powell's Court Suit Challenged by House Move

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Florida (FL), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C.

Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, the first black Congressman from New York State, files a suit with the federal court to regain his congressional seat after being excluded from Congress due to "unauthorized travel at taxpayers' expense and payroll padding." This newspaper article briefly details Powell's suit and The House of Representatives' response to the charge. The case would eventually be heard by the Supreme Court in Powell vs. McCormack, leading to the Federal Contested Elections Act in 1969.

Americans Need Some Discipline

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA

This Daily Californian editorial calls for "self-restraint" in civil rights demonstrations and a return to the "hard work, thrift, and adherence to the moral precepts that form the basis for this democracy." It continues to maintain that gratuitous demonstrations cause racial riots and violence, provoking the "wrath of whites who resent Negro intrusion in their neighborhoods" and thus undermine political support for Dr. King's cause. Dr.

Chicago Daily Defender: SCLC Aide Makes Spirited Capital March Call Here

Monday, February 5, 1968
Chicago Theological Seminary, S.C.L.C. Operation Breadbasket, United States White House, Poor People's Campaign, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, FRANCE

The Chicago Daily Defender published this article about Rev. Ralph Abernathy's visit to Chicago to promote the Poor People's Campaign. According to Abernathy, "Come this summer, thousands of poor Americans are going to take their burdens to the White House and they'll leave them with LBJ."

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, Connecticut (CT), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Howard University, Atlanta, GA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, MEXICO, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Review of "Why We Can't Wait"

A preview of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appearing in TIPS, highlights specific reasons why the American Negro is so unwilling to accept the system of gradualism as a way of obtaining his rights.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Missions Magazine published various articles concerning the baptist ministry and how the church is impacting its surrounding community. Dr. King contributed to the magazine by writing an article entitled "Out of the Long Night of Segregation." In the article, he writes about the nonviolent methods being used to end segregation in America.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

Chicago, IL

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

Young Americans Newsletter

Washington, D.C.

This Young Americans newsletter covers topics such as: The Vietnam War, Young Americans for Freedom, and the usage of violence for a good cause.

Soap, Brush Help

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967
Chicago, IL

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

Birmingham, AL, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966
Chicago, IL

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

To the Negroes of America

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, JAPAN, INDIA, ALBANIA, BULGARIA, CZECH REPUBLIC, GERMANY, HUNGARY, POLAND, FORMER YUGOSLOVIA, NIGERIA, CHINA, CANADA, Georgia (GA)

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

Thursday, June 27, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

How Much Head Start for Mississippi's Children?

Tuesday, November 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C.

Kay Longcope describes the current status of the Child Development Group of Mississippi following the decision to pull funding for the program made by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

News Article about MLK's Church and Atlanta Housing Project

Atlanta, GA

In this article, the author highlights Dr. King's involvement with a recent urban housing redevelopment project. The author states that the Ebenezer Baptist Church will commit full sponsorship; he later discusses the various plans in more detail and the purpose to community it will serve.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

Dairy Agrees to Double Number of Negro Workers

Wednesday, June 22, 1966
Chicago, IL

Operation Breadbasket shares an article on the organization's letterhead, which appeared in the Chicago Sun-times. The article highlights the end of a boycott after Mellody Dairy announces a decision to more than double its Negro employees.

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Saturday, March 3, 1962
Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), INDIA, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

The Cartoonist's View: Make Gains In St. Augustine

Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), St. Augustine, FL

This column features news on "gains in St. Augustine," and quotations from various sources on civil rights issues.