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Organize Voter Registration in North

Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King discusses the gap in black and white voters across the US,specifically in the North. King organizes speeches and a tour across Northern cities to get blacks registered to vote.

Two Noted Rights Workers Added to Staff of SCEF

New Orleans, LA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains Ella J. Baker and John R. Salter were added to the New Orleans based Southern Christian Educational Fund shortly before its headquarters were raided by more than 100 policemen on October 4th.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Howard University, Atlanta, GA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, MEXICO, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

In a Word- Now

Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

Washington, D.C.

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

New York Times Graphic: Minority Problems in White Collar Employment

Sunday, January 21, 1968
New York, NY

This graphic from The New York Times shows examples of demographic inequality in white collar jobs.

SCLC Voter Registration Report

Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC), Atlanta, GA, New Orleans, LA

After having a successful election year as a result of voter registration in Georgia and Tennessee in 1962, the SCLC decided to approach the whole South in attempting to get African Americans to vote. This report gives an overview of the voting situation at that time across the southern states. Other organizations, such as SNCC and the Southwide Voter Education Project, are also referenced as key organizations who helped influenced voter registration.

Brutality in Mississippi

Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL, Maryland (MD), North Carolina (NC)

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, CANADA, BELGIUM, FRANCE, GERMANY, ITALY, SWITZERLAND, NIGERIA, New York, NY, EGYPT, ISRAEL, Pennsylvania (PA), Nashville, TN, Ohio (OH), Connecticut (CT), Denver, CO, Texas (TX)

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

At Your Service!

Washington, D.C.

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

People In Action Column: "Can We Ever Repay Them"

Saturday, June 9, 1962
Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, New Orleans, LA

This column by Dr. King in the New York Amsterdam News highlights Dr. C.O. Simpkins, leader of the United Christian Movement. Following cross burnings on his front lawn, death threats, and other harassment, both his home and summer house were bombed. The arsonists returned again the next day to ensure the complete destruction of both buildings.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), West Virginia (WV), Birmingham, AL, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Cloudy Summit

Sunday, January 15, 1967
New York (NY)

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967
California (CA)

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

INDIA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), GHANA, New York (NY), New York, NY, FRANCE, New Delhi, India, SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Howe Fears Draft Of Too Many Students

This article discusses how Education Commissioner Harold Howe complained to a House Special Education Sub-Committee that more than a third of graduate students could expect to be drafted in the following year due to the changes in the Selective Service law.

Letter from Florence Read to MLK

Wednesday, May 5, 1965
LEBANON, California (CA), ISRAEL

Florence Read informs Dr. King that she received news of his Nobel Peace Prize while traveling in the Middle East. She encloses articles from The Jerusalem Times and The Daily Star of Beirut for Dr. King's records.

Newspaper Submissions on Race from U.S. Soldiers

This newspaper clipping features two submissions from U.S. Soldiers, both concerning racial issues.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Defends the Constitutional Rights

Friday, February 16, 1968
VIETNAM, New York (NY), New York, NY

ECLC writes to ask for assistance with their efforts to criminalize governmental draft tactics. As staunch supporters of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution, ECLC argues that the Draft is a violation of citizen's constitutional rights. Furthermore, they have dedicated their services to protecting the rights of youth, arguing that the draft is economically discriminatory in "student deferments". The organization challenges other civil liberties organizations to join them in this fight.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

New Orleans, LA

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

Articles Regarding Operation Breadbasket

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

These two articles from the Chicago Daily News and The Washington Post, discuss the economic improvement of Negroes in Chicago, IL.

Article regarding MLK

Chicago, IL

This article highlights Dr. Kings affiliation with the "New Left" Conference held in Chicago, Illinois.

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Prince Edward County, VA, Atlanta, GA, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Johannesburg, South Africa, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Connecticut (CT), North Carolina (NC), KENYA

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

People in Action: Unknown Heroes

Thursday, May 10, 1962
South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

This New York Amsterdam News article by Dr. King introduces two unknown heroes of the Civil Rights Movement in the South, Esau Jenkins and Billy Fleming. Jenkins taught the riders on his buses how to read and write so they could qualify to vote. This idea was the basis for SCLC's Citizenship School program. Fleming, an undertaker in Clarendon County, South Carolina, was a leader in the Briggs v. Elliott school desegregation lawsuit, the earliest of five suits to be combined in the US Supreme Court?s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.