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"Articles"

People in Action: Albany Justice

CUBA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Advice for Living

Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Tennessee (TN), Chicago, IL

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Virginia (VA)

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

Sunday, January 21, 1968
NIGERIA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, EGYPT

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, April 16, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, GERMANY, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

King to Visit Southside Virginia

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

This article describes Dr. King's visit to Virginia on the "people-to-people" tour as a part of the Poor People's Campaign.

New York Times Graphic: Minority Problems in White Collar Employment

Sunday, January 21, 1968
New York, NY

This graphic from The New York Times shows examples of demographic inequality in white collar jobs.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Howard University, Atlanta, GA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, MEXICO, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

Thursday, June 27, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

Cloudy Summit

Sunday, January 15, 1967
New York (NY)

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Johnson Said to be Choice of Negroes

Virginia (VA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Kivie Kaplan, the President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that they would be endorsing Johnson for President. Kaplan said their decision was not made lightly, and they will always endorse the candidate who has a principle of equality for all.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964
New York (NY)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

"Dr. King Outdated"

Saturday, July 15, 1967
North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN)

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

Articles Regarding Strides Made in the Civil Rights Movement

Atlanta, GA, Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, GRENADA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This SCLC news bulletin published around 1964, discloses information regarding Dr. King and others staying in the Birmingham jail. Also included are updates on the progress of the Civil Rights Movement in various cities, additions and changes within the SCLC and relationships with familiar and notable personalities.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, California (CA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951
CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

James Meredith Article

Mississippi (MS)

A newspaper article describes an argument that occurred between James Meredith and a group of black deacons in the city of Canton, Miss. The argument ultimately led to Meredith stating "I can understand why so many Negroes have been lynched."

Newspaper Article about MLK

Saturday, August 21, 1965
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

In this article, Horace Sheffield responds to speculation that Dr. King will hold a "Summer Crusade" in Detroit.

What's Your Brotherhood Quotient?

National Comics Publications, Inc. publishes this questionnaire as a public service to gauge the attitudes of readers while also enlightening readers about their own xenophobic perceptions. The writer asserts that it is okay to dislike vegetables or insects, but to dislike people is to "hurt them and cheat yourself."

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, California (CA), Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), CANADA

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

We're Ready to Guzzle It, But We Ain't Ready to Make It!

George S. Schuyler uses his weekly "Views and Reviews" column to voice his opinions about the lack of economic initiative in the Negro community.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.