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"Articles"

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

The Burning Truth in the South

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Strength to Love

In this article, Dr. King's accomplishments are highly spoken upon. There is also information on his book "Strength to Love," and a form to order additional copies of his books.

Why We Can't Wait Book Review

Monday, June 22, 1964

This article highlights Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Chicago Daily Defender: SCLC Aide Makes Spirited Capital March Call Here

Monday, February 5, 1968

The Chicago Daily Defender published this article about Rev. Ralph Abernathy's visit to Chicago to promote the Poor People's Campaign. According to Abernathy, "Come this summer, thousands of poor Americans are going to take their burdens to the White House and they'll leave them with LBJ."

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

Urban League Feeling a Financial Squeeze

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

This article focuses on the Chicago Urban League's struggle to gain financial support from contributors. According to the organization's director Edwin C. Berry, former contributors failed to accept the fact that the goals and scope of the league would preclude the organization from becoming a "protest group."

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

"Open Hearings Bill Offered in House"

This article addresses political concerns in Jackson, Mississippi, as introduced by John Perkins and Ralph Sowell Jr. The "freedom of information" act will allow the public to be active and aware of political actions. Any violation of this act will result in a penalty for the individual or organization.

Call to Survival

Sunday, November 5, 1967

This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American history...as one of the great men of all time."

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

Hruska Says Capital...

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

3000 Jackson Negros Flay Headstart Cutoff

This article discusses the protest of African Americans to the ending of the Headstart nursey program, and the reallocation of those funds to other state programs.

Amsterdam News: The Measure of A Man - Jackie Robinson

Thursday, September 20, 1962

Dr. King describes his interpretation on the life and efforts of Jackie Roosevelt Robinson to further the cause of Social Justice in America.

People in Action: "The Negro Looks at America"

Dr. King discusses the synonymous relationship between segregation and colonialism which was addressed at the Arden House Campus of Columbia University. This discussion was formally named the American Negro Leadership Conference for it covered in array of issues and involved various organizations.

Dr. King on Vietnam: Demagogic Tactics

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall critiques Dr. King's Vietnam stance and asserts that Dr. King's position undermines his work and credibility as a civil rights leader.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

U.S. News and World Report: Is Insurrection Brewing in U.S.?

Monday, December 25, 1967

This article in the U.S. News and World Report features an interview with Richard H. Sanger, known for his experience in the United States Foreign Service and his abilities to recognize the patterns of political violence.

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Postcard from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Tuesday, September 5, 1967

This postcard from an anonymous author contains a newspaper clipping which was published in the Athens Daily News. In the article, Archie Moore, former light heavyweight champion, gives his views about a "guaranteed national income."

In a Word- Now

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

Fight for Open City

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Included in The United Council Sentinel, is an excerpt featuring an initiative of Dr. King and various others: Operation Breadbasket. The author explores the details of this specific movement.

Reviews of Strength to Love

These reviews of Dr. King's "Strength to Love" illustrate King's use of theological beliefs in conjunction with the struggle for civil rights reform.