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"Martin Luther King, Jr. - Honors"

MLK Style Sheet: Why We Can't Wait

Here we see what is known as a style sheet for Dr. King's third book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King's book was published in 1964 following the success of the infamous SCLC Birmingham desegregation campaign.

Official Program of the Spring Mobilization

The following document is an official program listing the schedule of the Spring Mobilization on April 15, 1967.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

Letter from Emily Ann Fortson to MLK

Wednesday, June 29, 1966

Emily Fortson, of Concreta Tours, informs Dr. King of the developing proposal related to his upcoming Holy Land Pilgrimage.

Christianity

Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Letter from Mahalia Jackson Foundation Requesting Financial Support

In this letter addressed to "Friend," gospel singer Mahalia Jackson requests financial support for the Mahalia Jackson Foundation, which helps deserving children obtain a higher education.

Letter from MLK to David Brandyberry

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. Brandyberry for his recent letter and explains why the current time is "a wonderful and challenging age." He also expresses his hope that the work done in Birmingham, Alabama will bring about better race relations.

Notes for U.F.T. Address

On March 14, 1964, Dr. King was presented with the John Dewey Award by the United Teachers Federation. The address he delivered that day is outlined in this type-written draft along with his handwritten notes. In the draft, Dr. King emphasizes the importance of education, especially as a tool for African American advancement. He cites how the deprivation of education has been used as a way to systematically oppress African Americans and he asserts that this inequality is a reality that must be confronted. Dr.

Telegram from Mrs. Robbie L. McCoy to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

The Chronicle Church Recorder for The Women of Detroit sends Dr. King a request for suggestions regarding the organization's upcoming demonstration against the "treatment of Negroes in Selma Alabama."

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

William Kivi references a statement made by Dr. King at the SCLC convention pertaining to everyone having a "guaranteed income." Kivi's belief is that Republican officials in the state of California continue to chisel away at federal programs designed to give the poor access to health care and other government aid. His recommendation to Dr. King as a solution would be a "restructured national civil service."

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Annual Report, 1955-1956

This report contains vital information concerning the organizational structure, services, and members of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Dr. King provides a heartfelt address to the Montgomery, AL congregation as he seeks to extend the church's influence throughout the community amidst his growing involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Social Ethics

This biblical scripture, deriving from the book of Deuteronomy, suggests that people who assist the poor will be blessed.

Letter from Robert K. Hudnut to MLK about a Monument

Thursday, July 1, 1965

In this letter Robert K. Hudnut of the St. Luke Presbyterian Church offers an idea to Dr. King, namely to build a monument for those that have given their life in the line of civil rights. Hudnut proposes to call the monument "A Martyrs' Monument."

Oppositional Letter to MLK

A critic of Dr. King advises him to help his supporters purchase birth control instead of focusing on civil rights.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King quotes American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the subject of God.

Letter from Attorney General Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a copy of his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee about civil rights legislation.

Letter from Ralph Ahlberg to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

Minister Ahlberg extends condolences on behalf of The Congregational Church of Rockville Centre to Rev. Abernathy upon the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from C. Kenzie Steele to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962

C. Kenzie Steele writes Dr. King to thank him for his "expression of encouragement" for the celebration of his Tenth Anniversary as pastor of Bethel Baptist Church.

Letter from L. Serron to MLK

L. Serron writes to Dr. King requesting materials on the Selma Demonstration and the March on Montgomery for class usage.

Civil Rights Drive by SCLC and Other Groups Wins Open Housing Victory in Louisville

Saturday, December 30, 1967

This 1967 SCLC news release details the passage of a law forbidding racial discrimination in housing in Louisville, Kentucky. It also details the role that SCLC and its sister organizations had in bring about this legislation.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brightman's views on Science and Religion.

Class Notes: Joshua

This eleven card series features Biblical verses from the Book of Joshua which Dr. King references under specific subject titles. The section titles range from "Knowledge" to "Passages for Homiletical Use."

Worship Must Have Three Things

Dr. King states that "worship" must have three things: unity, movement, and rhythm.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Sunday, November 29, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, includes a summary of several foreign contracts drawn on Dr. King's behalf for three of his books.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Urban League Feeling a Financial Squeeze

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

This article focuses on the Chicago Urban League's struggle to gain financial support from contributors. According to the organization's director Edwin C. Berry, former contributors failed to accept the fact that the goals and scope of the league would preclude the organization from becoming a "protest group."

Power

Dr. King cites Karen Horney's "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time.