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"Martin Luther King, Jr. - Honors"

Letter from Richard Actis-Grande to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Richard Actise-Grande notifies Dr. King of an enclosed advance copy of Look Magazine. Actise-Grande believes that articles by Eric Sevareid, a former CBS news reporter and war correspondent, and Senator Edward Brooke will be of special interest to Dr. King.

The Burning Truth in the South

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Forgiveness

Dr. King writes on the topic of "forgiveness," as mentioned in Nehemiah 9:17.

Letter from Nippon Television Corporation

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Producer Yasuo Yamanaka acknowledges Dr. King's consideration of an invitation to appear on his television program in Tokyo, Japan.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

Letter from Rev. Max F. Daskam to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests the return of Dr. King's presence for their Pulpit Schedule of the current year. Years have passed since Dr. King has visited and the church "would rejoice" if he could provide a date.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Get Well Card for MLK

A Get Well card for Dr. King from Deedie and Debbie Alexander.

Card from Sophia Anderson to MLK

Mrs. Sophia Anderson wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery.

Soren Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes about Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard's first stage at which men live, aesthetics.

SCLC Newsletter: Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany

In this newsletter, SCLC announces integration in Albany, GA and believes that the city will soon face the legal death of segregation. They also inform readers of the arrest of SCLC Petersburg President, David Gunter.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech given during the March on Washington. Additionally Gertler requests speeches by Baynard Rustin and A. Philip Randolph. Gertler also mentions that he was present when Dr. King spoke in Montreal last year.

Capitalism

Dr. King quotes the Honorable John Rankin's remarks regarding capitalism. He discusses two motives that make human beings work: "fear of punishment and the hope of reward."

Letter from MLK to Laura R. Daly

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Dr. King apologizes to Laura Daly for his delayed response and expresses his appreciation for her financial contribution. He states that the "new democracy" that has emerged in the south would not be possible without the moral and financial support from contributors such as Miss Daly. He discusses how there is still work to accomplish and the SCLC will continue their efforts in the freedom struggle.

Poor People's Campaign News

Friday, March 15, 1968

This newsletter shares details regarding the end of a historic meeting of American minority group leaders who declared unanimous support for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. The names of organizations and leaders pledging their support are also included.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Monday, September 11, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Mr. E. M. Bettenson from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne of a date that Dr. King will be available to receive an Honorary Degree.

Letter from Harry J. Cargas to MLK Regarding The Queen's Work

Tuesday, November 19, 1963

The editor of "The Queen's Work," a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society, sends Dr. King a copy of the December issue. The editor informs Dr. King that the magazine goes out to twenty thousand Catholic high school students around the nation, and this issue's focus on interracial justice should interest Dr. King.

Book Cover Notes

These remarks about Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" were prepared for the cover of his book and offer a very helpful overview of the early days of Dr. King's work.

CORE Treasure's Report for 1961 Fiscal Year

The Treasurer's Report from CORE includes the balance sheet for the fiscal year of 1961. The financial report covers an array of assets, liabilities, contributions, expenditures, and more.

The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 1, 1967

In this reprint of an article originally printed in the fall of 1965, Professor Robert S. Browne makes a charge to the Department of Defense that the Negro troops were being used in Vietnam in disproportionate numbers. Freedomsways publications re-released the publication due to its remarkably fresh and informative content and high demand.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

Letter from Katherine Kasper to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Katherine Kasper, a Chicago collegiate junior, requests the political opinions of Dr. King in anticipation of the 1968 Presidential Elections.

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Ethel T. Elsea, Assistant Editor of Fleming H. Revell Company, writes Dr. King requesting to use his quotation in Frank S. Mead's unpublished book. Elsea also encloses a release form for the Reverend to sign and return.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

The Alberton Family Sends Condolence Offerings

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

The Albertson family sends to Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Young their condolences for Dr. King's death in the form of contribution and encouraging words.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Letter from MLK to Lester Kendel Jackson

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a check to Dr. Jackson at St. Paul Baptist Church in Gary, Indiana, to aid with reconstruction of the church.

Letter from Lisl Cade to Dora McDonald Regarding Various Interview Requests for Dr. King

In this letter, Lisl Cade of Harper & Row Publishers requests for Dr. King to interview with a Washington, D.C. television program and a San Francisco radio program.