Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Martin Luther King, Jr. - Honors"

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

In this letter Ms. Daves covers several topics relating to dealings with publishers and the protocol in the future. She makes a number of recommendations on the allocation of Dr. King's time and resources and stresses the priority of "a constructive and continuing publishing program related to your work and ideas."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Kjelle Eide

Monday, January 29, 1968

In this letter Dr. King is expressing regret to Kjell Eide for the continued difficulty in organizing the peace mission. He currently aims to focus on the organizational plans for domestic issues, but would still consider a proposed alternative.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK's Book Draft

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Genevieve Young, from Harper & Row Publishers, expresses concern regarding an outline for Dr. King's upcoming book. She suggests an alternative way to frame the outline, and advises Joan Daves to use her discretion as to whether or not the memorandum should be passed on to Dr. King.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Religion

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

Letter from Linda Frawley to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968

Linda Frawley, the campus coordinator for Suffolk University, requests any "pseudo-campaign" materials that Dr. King may be able to send. The materials are to be used in the National Intercollegiate Presidential Primary, sponsored by Time Magazine.

Telegram from MLK to Bluford Jackson Extending Congratulations

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this telegram dated 1/26/68 addressed to Mr. Jackson, Dr. King extends congratulations to Dr. Richard Francis on his appointment as Director of the Sunmount State School.

Pride

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine and C. S. Lewis on pride.

Barth, Karl

Dr. King comments on Karl Barth's view that Christ assumed fallen human nature.

Telegram from Community Leaders to Dr. King

Sunday, October 22, 1967

This telegram is requesting that Dr. King contact certain prominent politicians to urge their support for funding "rent supplements" and "model citizens" programs.

Letter from MLK to Roberta Evans

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Evans for her kind gesture in sending a letter enclosed with a book by Will Campbell. Dr. King believes his views on race will be a benefit to him.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Clyde L. Manschreck

Thursday, August 15, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald responds to a previous request made by Rev. Clyde Manschreck of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. Miss McDonald informs Rev. Manschreck that the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" will be a part of Dr. King's newest publication that will be available in the fall of 1963.

Support Letter from

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Donna Breiter conveys her support of Dr. King's work within the Civil Rights Movement. Due to her finances she cannot physically attend marches, but she inquirers of other ways to support the efforts.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Marie L. Jones Regarding Reverend Ashton Jones

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

Mary L. Jones sent out this letter reporting on the plight of her husband, Reverend Ashton Jones, who was arrested in July of 1963 for attempting to lead an interracial student group into a service at the segregated First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Reverend Jones was sentenced to a year in the Georgia state prison and six months of hard labor for the crime of "disturbing a worship service." Mrs. Jones encourages readers of her letter to heed the advice of British social critic Bertrand Russell, by writing an "avalanche of letters" to those responsible.

Letter From MLK to Eugene Exman

Friday, March 9, 1962

Dr. King, in this correspondence to Dr. Eugene Exman, expressed his joy in finding out that his book was selected, out of 500, to be presented to President John Kennedy. Dr. King, furthermore, apologized for a continued delay in finishing a manuscript of sermons for a second book. Dr. King's sermons would be converted into his second publication, "Strength to Love."

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Religion

Dr. King records a quote on religion from William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

B.F. Randolph

B.F. Randolph, African American preacher and member of the South Carolina Legislature, is honored in this statement for his work against racial discrimination. The documents states that Mr. Randolph fought for the words 'irrespective of race and color,' to be included in the Bill of Rights.

Telegram from MLK to Joan Baez

Friday, December 29, 1967

Dr. King sends encouraging words to Joan Baez, an American singer and civil rights activist, who is imprisoned at Santa Rita Rehabilitation Center.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.

Machiavelli

Dr. King disagrees with Machiavelli's notion that political morality should be separated from social morality. Dr. King uses a quote from Heinrich von Treitschke to further analyze the issue.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

A. N. Whitehead

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's view of the philosophy of science in The Concept of Nature.

Letter from Lotte Kallos to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

Lotte Kallos writes Dr. King on behalf of the Student Union of Lund University in Sweden, inviting him to speak after receiving word of his upcoming visit to Europe.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."