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"Social Gospel"

The Secular in Relation to the Holy

Dr. King quotes theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology." Dr. King's doctoral degree is in systematic theology from Boston University and his dissertation is on Paul Tillich. According to Tillich, secular and holy correlate and cannot act separately. Tillich states, "The holy embraces itself and the secular."

Letter from Edward Williams to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

The United Presbyterian Church's Commission on Religion and Race awarded a grant to SCLC for the salary of Hosea Williams. The letter accompanies a check for partial payment.

Eutychius

Dr. King gives brief biographical detail on Eutychius.

Letter from Aziz Shihab to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

Aziz Shihab offers the services of National Tours of Jordan in arranging Dr. King's trip to the Holy Land.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Flyer

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

The flyer highlights the 10th anniversary of the SCLC and outlines the speakers and events which will take place.

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Thursday, August 10, 1967

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

Unsigned Letter of Support

Monday, December 25, 1967

The following document is a letter of support and encouragement written to Dr. King, the President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Washington CORE to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

The Washington CORE asks Dr. King to clear up the apparent misunderstanding that Dr. King approves of Coleman for the fifth circuit.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Saturday, April 29, 1967

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Draft of Prayer Given by Dr. King

This document is a handwritten draft of a prayer, given by Dr. King. The prayer thanked God for "gifts of mind with which thou hast endowed us." The date and place, in which this prayer was given, is unknown.

Letter from S. Leiss to Dr. King about Payment from Simon and Schuster, Inc.

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Here in this notation, Leiss references a check enclosure as a permission fee to reprint "I Have a Dream" in the "Treasure of the World's Greatest Speeches" literature.

Response Letter to Mr. Frank Abrams from Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King addressed this letter to Mr. Frank Abrams, as an expression of thanks, in response for his well wishes. As a another gesture of thanks, Dr. King indicated that he also enclosed a copy of his first book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Resolution for the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives

This document is a resolution that explains the rules for current and incoming members of the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Marx

Dr. King quotes an unknown source on Marx.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Senator Kenneth B. Keating responds to Dr. King's previous message by providing him with a copy of a statement he delivered before the Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from M. A. Cross to Marie Goldner

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

M. A. Cross, Director of Public and Industrial Relations at Dan River Mills, Inc., informs Mrs. Goldner that Dan River Mills, Inc. does not discriminate against Negroes.

The People Speak

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

The neighborhood residents initiate a self-reliant program entitled, "Self-Help Policy-67 Model", due to the inadequacies within the federal government's Anti-poverty Program and the War on Poverty Program. These individuals are considered "The New Breed" and are working to cease their economic disparities. They correlate the biblical story of Nicodemus to associate the promised land of economic freedom.

Letter from Abie Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962

Mr. Williams, a former parishioner of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, now imprisoned, bids Dr. King's pastoral advice. In addition, he requests a few of Dr. Kings books for studying purposes.

Man

Dr. King records geologist Robert Gheyselinck’s observation about the brevity of human history in relation to the earth’s history

Telegram from Bennette, Calhoun and Ellis to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

J.H. Calhoun, Ocelia Ellis and Fred Bennette send their prayers and support to Dr. King during Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham City Jail.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Ralph McGill

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Dr. King writes to Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution to clarify his position on the Vietnam War. Dr. King considers his objection to the war to be a matter of conscience, and not one of political expediency.

Letter from Mary Brown to MLK

Sunday, October 31, 1965

Mary Brown, a student at Seward Park High School, asks for Dr. King's assistance in her presentation of a discussion on the challenges of the "Civil Rights workers."

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, October 31, 1966

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

Suffering

Dr. King expounds upon suffering and notes that things which may not appear as defeat, may be transformed in victory.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Edward Hill

Tuesday, September 18, 1962

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the hospitality he received from Reverend Edward Hill during his visit at Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church. Dr. King offers prayers and best wishes for the continued success of Rev. Hill and his congregation.