Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Social Gospel"

Letter from Ehru E. Hart to SCLC

Wednesday, April 6, 1966

Hart sends commendations to Dr. King after hearing him speak, and requests copies of the speech.

Letter from the Seattle Benefit Guild to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963

The Benefit Guild of Seattle, Washington responds to a previous letter sent by Dr. King, in which Dr. King declined an invitation to make an appearance. The Guild's President and Secretary ask Dr. King to reconsider, so that they can help the SCLC in its work.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

H.D. Bollinger is honored to have Dr. King as a speaker for their Eighth Quadrennial Methodist Student Movement Conference at the Municipal Auditorium. Mr. Bollinger communicates with Dora McDonald the details of Dr. King's trip. He also informs her that they will cover the travel expenses for Dr. King's assistant and have received the items he requested. In an additional letter a month later, the director of the conference notifies Miss McDonald that they are in need of five additional photographs and the address of Dr. King.

Draft of Statement by MLK on his Involvement With the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers

Dr. King wishes to clarify his endorsement of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. He states that he did not mean to imply that there was a civil rights issue in the "collective bargaining election," but rather that he admires the accomplishments of the labor movement.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Rev. Roland de Corneille informs Dr. King that he has been invited by the International Teach-In Committee at the University of Toronto to participate in a program featuring representatives from Vietnam.

Invitation from the Government of Barbados to MLK

The Government of Barbados invite Dr. King and Coretta Scott King to the Celebrations to Mark the Independence of Barbados. This event held high historical importance due Barbados' inquiry for independence for many years.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Friday, November 1, 1963

Donald G. Brownlow from Department of History invites Dr. King to speak with students on the current issues of today, especially race relations in the United States. Dr. King's handwritten note in the margin indicates, "Can't go this academic year...Southern struggle."

Letter from Cornell's L. Paul Jaquith to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1960

L. Paul Jaquith writes Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit to Cornell University. The student body seeks to discuss issues relating to the inequality of opportunities for Negroes in the United States.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

Letter from D. F. Lewis to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

D. F. Lewis, a member of the County Line Missionary Baptist Association, commends Dr. King for "fighting on the Lord's side." The organization contributes to the SCLC to continue the fight against racial injustice in the United States.

Sin

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 1:18-20 indicates that sacrifices are not needed to be saved from sin; willingness and obedience are the way to be saved.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

Letter from Jeanette Harris to MLK

Sunday, February 23, 1964

Jeannette Harris writes Dr. King, enclosing her resume in hopes of being employed by the Gandhi Society in San Francisco.

Stanford University Faculty and Staff Pledge of Civil Disobedience

Friday, May 26, 1967

The Faculty and Staff members of Stanford University make a pledge of civil disobedience to protest the Vietnam conflict. The individuals signing the pledge request members of the clergy and academic community with like sentiments to join them in this demonstration.

Letter from Senator William Proxmire to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964

US Senator William Proxmire writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for the Reverend's previous letter regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Barry Diamond to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Barry Diamond, Chairman of Choice 68 at the University of Florida, informs Dr. King that his name will be on the ballot and invites him to speak at the University. Diamond explains that Choice 68 is "a national collegiate presidential primary sponsored by Time Magazine."

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

Letter from Miriam Ottenberg to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Miriam Ottenberg, President of the Women's National Press Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and asks if he would address a luncheon for the Club. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Press Release Issued by MLK

Monday, June 5, 1961

The following document is a press release issued by Dr. King. In the first section, he comments on the success of various civil rights demonstrations across the nation. In the second section, of the press release, Dr. King makes a clear distinction between race riots and nonviolent movements in Alabama.

Letter from Hugh Bingham to MLK

Friday, April 22, 1966

Hugh Bingham, Associate Editor of the London Daily Mirror, requests help planning his trip to the United States to report on the "progress and processes of integration." He explains that, in addition to the political aspects of integration, he would also like to write about the people involved in the movement.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Letter from W. Harding Kneedler to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

Dr. W. Harding Kneedler states that "marches are outdated" and believes that a solution is to have quiet organized action.

Lincoln

Dr. King gives a brief description of the timeline for Abraham Lincoln. He describes Lincoln's many defeats and eventual presidential triumph.

Moving to Another Mountain

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Jean Ward Wolff to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

Jean Ward Wolff expresses her concern about Dr. King turning his back on truth and justice in the form of supporting Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to Hubert Jones

Monday, August 26, 1963

Mr. Walker, SCLC Executive Assistant, responds on behalf of Dr. King to Hubert Jones regarding a "nation-wide project." Walker feels that the project would be premature at the moment and explains that his efforts locally would be valuable.

Telegram from MLK to President John F. Kennedy

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King sends an urgent telegram to President Kennedy recommending Judge William Hastie and Judge Thurgood Marshall be given serious consideration for a seat on the Supreme Court.