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The Philosophy Of Nonviolence And the Tactic Of Nonviolent Resistance

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS)

This document discusses the philosophy and tactic of nonviolence. The three nonviolent resisters discussed are Jesus, Gandhi, and Dr. King.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to the Honorable Dean Rusk

Tuesday, October 11, 1966
Washington, D.C., ZAMBIA, New York, NY

In this letter, Roy Wikins extends an invitation to Sec. of State, Dean Rusk, to attend a meeting of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable E.L. Bartlett

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Alaskan Congressman Edward Lewis Bartlett to express appreciation for his vote in support of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Permission to Include King's New York Times Article in College Textbook

Thursday, January 12, 1967
Colorado (CO)

Phillip O. Foss, Chairman of the Political Science Department of Colorado State University, seeks Dr. King's permission to include his article "Civil Right No. 1 - The Right to Vote" in a college textbook. Foss is preparing the textbook "Major Issues of Our Time", to be published by Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Western Union Telegram from James McDaniel to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

Mr. McDaniel invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the executive committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968
Washington, D.C., FRANCE

This letter from Mr. Harry Daniels to Dr. King addresses, among other things, Medicare, the upcoming presidential election, and government lending.

Letter from M. Steven Lubet to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967
Illinois (IL)

M. Steven Lubet is requesting the presence of Mr. and Mrs. King at the Vietnam teach-in. The teach-in is being sponsored by the Northwestern chapter of Students for a Democratic Society and its purpose is to increase people's understanding of the events occuring in Vietnam.

Letter from August Schou to MLK

Thursday, November 26, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA

August Schou of the Nobel Committee responds to Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, regarding Dr. King's arrival in Norway for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. Schou explains the importance of Dr. King arriving at the recommended date as well as the proper attire and a short list of other individuals invited to join Dr. King.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

Letter from MLK to Wesley A. Hotchkiss

Tuesday, March 1, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Dr. Wesley A. Hotchkiss from the United Church of Christ for his generous contribution of $11,000 to the SCLC. King includes a list of how they money will be spent to assist with voter registration.

American Negro Concert Pianist Undertakes 100 Cites Tour in Support of Haiti's Pan American Festival of the New World

HAITI, Washington, D.C., SENEGAL

Ambassador Bonhomme announces the Pan American Festival of the New World, proposed and implemented by Negro-American Concert Pianist Robert Pritchard. The festival's inauguration was held in Haiti in the summer of 1969. The event attracted students in the "Pan American hemisphere." The festival's main features focused on the establishment of three summer schools.

Draft of Speech for SCLC in Nashville

Nashville, TN

Dr. King is outlining a speech he later presented to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Nashville.

Response to Reasons Why African Americans Should Boycott Whitey's Olympics

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
LIBERIA, Chicago, IL

The writer responds to an article in The Post on why African Americans should boycott the Olympics. He believes that Negroes should return to Africa or form their own community in the US separate from whites. God did not intend whites and Negroes to live together, the author maintains, or would have made them the same color. Negroes should take responsibility for their own condition rather than blaming whites. test

Letter from Sixth Grader to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
California (CA), Berkeley, CA

Kathy Brewster, an African American sixth grade student from Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude towards Dr. King for helping the Negro race.

Letter from Linda Robinson to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA, California (CA)

Linda Robinson, a sixth grade student at Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing her admiration towards him for his work with the Civil Rights Movement.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966
Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Apollinarianism

Dr. King defines Apollinarianism.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

And There Was Love

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from MLK to Susan Rowland

Tuesday, November 7, 1967
CANADA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Dr. King informs Susan Roland, a member of the Student Christian Movement at the University of Western Ontario, that due to numerous commitments, he will be unable to accept the invitation to speak at the institution.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC)

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Man (Cause of Sin)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from Dr. John Halsey to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. James Halsey of the University of Bridgeport expresses gratitude for Dr. King's contribution to the Alumni Average Gift Improvement Matching Plan.

Letter from Dorothy Dunbar Bromley to Andrew Young

Monday, April 24, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Bromley informs Reverend Andrew Young that she would like to write Dr. King's biography.

Spencer

Dr. King records a quote from Herbert Spencer’s “First Principles.”

Letter from L. D. Reddick to Colleagues

Monday, November 21, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

L. D. Reddick's colleagues received this letter pertaining to the business of Dr. King's papers and where they should be housed.

Letter from MLK to Catherine Haney Brock

Friday, July 30, 1965
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Dr. King thanks Dr. Brock for her generous contribution to the SCLC. King expresses his sincere gratitude and discusses how his organization uses the money received from its donors.