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Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 12, 1965

Joan Daves informs Miss McDonald that attachments include carbon copies of checks that were "in question."

Letter from Gwendolyn E. Coleman to MLK

Thursday, March 4, 1965

Mrs. Gwendolyn Coleman, Secretary of the Raleigh County Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak during a Freedom Rally in an effort to unite the community for employment.

Montesquieu

Dr. King cites the political philosopher Montesquieu on his ideology of the weakness of laws. He further details the comparison of coexistence and consecutive social status. Dr. King concludes with the elaboration of Montesquieu's use of facts.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, July 29, 1965

SCLC Vice President-At-Large, Ralph D. Abernathy, grants permission for the release of information to Jesse B. Blayton. Mr. Blayton was Georgia's first black Certified Public Accountant.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to the Honorable Dean Rusk

Tuesday, October 11, 1966

In this letter, Roy Wikins extends an invitation to Sec. of State, Dean Rusk, to attend a meeting of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Auguste Sabatier's "Outlines of a Philosophy of Religion Based on Psychology and History."

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

Letter from Fannie Lou Hamer to Friends

Monday, October 23, 1967

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer requests the help of 'Friends', pertaining to voting rights in Mississippi. Mrs. Hamer also details some of the sufferings of black folks in Mississippi, especially, as it pertains to potential repercussions for them registering to vote.

Letter from Pastor F. Peter Sabey to MLK

Monday, April 26, 1965

Pastor F. Peter Sabey of the Lafayette College Church invites Dr. King to give a sermon at the church. Sabey states that he will cover the expenses for Dr. King and give an honorarium if he accepts.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Leon H. Sullivan

Wednesday, October 31, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. Leon Sullivan for visiting Atlanta and delivering a powerful message. Dr. King had asked Rev. Sullivan to come to Atlanta and meet with local ministers to discuss the selective patronage program Sullivan developed in Philadelphia. This program became the model for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

American Foundation on Nonviolence Board Meeting

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Harry W. Wachtel reports the minutes of the American Foundation of Nonviolence Board Meeting held in New York City, New York.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

MLK Drafted as a Presidential Candidate Announcement

The Peoples Committee of America drafts Dr. King as their candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election.

The Answer to a Perplexing Question

"Why Could Not We Cast Him Out?" is a chapter in Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." In this chapter, Dr. King discusses the methods in which man attempts to deal with evil in the world. Two methodologies are distinguished. The first concerns man's independent attempt to remove evil and the second stems from man's ideology of making God solely responsible for eliminating evil. Dr. King concludes that neither method is successful and that man has to find a medium between the two.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

List of Historical Theologians and Events

Here, Dr. King lists a series of historical theologians and events dating from the second to nineteenth centuries.

Vision of a World Made New

Thursday, September 9, 1954

This is a draft of "The Vision of a World Made New," a speech that Dr. King delivered during the 1954 Women's Auxiliary Convention. President Nannie H. Burroughs invited Dr. King to address the group's annual meeting where he condemned imperialism, colonialism, and segregation.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gulliace

Dr. King writes Mr. Gulliace thanking him for requesting him to comment on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life after Death." However, due to Dr. King's busy schedule with the Movement and ministry, he cannot commit the time to assist Mr. Gulliace.

Letter from MLK to Daniel K. Inouye

Friday, January 24, 1964

Dr. King commends Hawaiian Senator Daniel K. Inouye for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from S. W. Molodtsov to MLK

Thursday, January 19, 1967

The International Institute for Peace sends this letter to Dr. King on behalf of the World Council of Peace. A recent meeting undertook "a major step towards the international coordination of activities to end the war in Vietnam," and the meeting resulted the decision to host an international peace conference. Dr. King is invited to participate in the conference. The Council expresses that his presence and contribution would greatly enhance the conference's impact on anti-Vietnam efforts.

Resolution of the SCLC Board Regarding Vietnam

Thursday, August 11, 1966

This resolution of the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, outlines the effects of the expansion of the Vietnam War and recommends future action steps for the administration of the organization.

Letter from MLK to Jim Harney of Saint Gregory's Rectory

Dr. King thanks Jim Harney for his letter of support. He touches on his own views of Vietnam, pointing out that the war is a symptom of a deeper problem, and those who seek peace through nonviolence must always strive to make their voices be heard.

The Negro

This poem describes the strength and perseverance of the Negro during difficult times.

Letter from Roselyn Silverman to Dora McDonald

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Roselyn Silverman sends Dora McDonald a letter, with enclosed memorandum, in regards to a tentative itinerary for Dr. King's upcoming lecture.

Letter from H. Carl Moultrie to MLK

Saturday, January 25, 1964

H. Carl Moultrie invites Dr. King or another representative to participate in a panel discussion as a part of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity's Annual Grand Conclave. Moultrie also provides brief information about the fraternity.

Around The World Pilgrimage Proposal

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

Mr. W Emerson Smith appoints Dr. King and Mr. Abernathy as leaders of a proposed pilgrimage around the world. Mr. Smith outlines the estimated costs and planned itinerary along with profits for the SCLC.

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

Emancipation Proclamation Dinner Program

Dr. King speaks at a dinner engagement honoring the centennial anniversary of The Emancipation Proclamation.