Themes

The Archive

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from Marc de Jesus to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Marc de Jesus writes to Mrs. King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 8, 1967

In this letter, Gitta Badeker, from the office of Joan Daves, informs Dr. King that enclosed are copies of the contract for a Norwegian-language edition of "Where Do We Go from Here. The contract requested for Dr. King to sign and initial.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Thomson, a representative of the Canadian Friends' Service Committee, invites Dr. King to participate in a week-long conference held in Toronto, Ontario. The event will consist of diplomats from all over the world.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, April 9, 1967

Dr. King discusses the primary three dimensions of life, which include: length, breadth, and height.

SCLC Proposal for Recruiting "Grass Root" Delegates

Monday, June 12, 1967

This document contains a proposal for recruiting 1,745 "grass root" delegates to the SCLC's 1967 Annual Convention. Also included is a desired amount of delegates from southern states, a proposed list of meeting places, and a budget for recruiting the delegates.

Letter from Dora to Joan

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this letter, Dora McDonald sends a photograph to Joan Daves.

Gregory the Great (540-604)

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding Gregory the Great otherwise known as Pope Gregory I.

Letter from Committee on Racial Justice

Sunday, February 11, 1968

In this letter, the Committee on Racial Justice provides update on their activities and encouragement.

Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Linda Brown

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student expresses condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Letter from Leroy Johnson to MLK

State Senator Leroy R. Johnson forwards a Senate Pass to Dr. King, and informs him of an open invitation to visit the Senate at his leisure.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Samuel B. McKinney

Dr. and Mrs. King express their condolences for the passing of Reverend Samuel B. McKinney's mother.

Teacher Exchange

Thursday, December 17, 1964

The Darien Board of Education exchange program is under scrutiny, given claims that African American teachers integrating into the majority Caucasian Connecticut school district will be unqualified to teach.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Wachman

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King informs Dr. Wachman, that due to his extremely busy schedule and his particular attention to the South, he will not be able to accept an invitation to speak at Lincoln University.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from R. A. Peterson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This letter of condolence, originating from a Bank of America executive in San Francisco, CA and addressed to Mrs. King. The writer expresses hope that Dr. King's work and legacy will carry forward in his tradition of nonviolence.

Invitation Letter from Mrs. Frank K. Simms to MLK and CSK to Attend the 28th Annual Coference of the National Association of Ministers' Wives

Sunday, November 19, 1967

Mrs. Sims invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 28th Annual Converence of the National Association of Ministers' Wives in Chicago IL.

Support from Lawyer Grenville Clark to Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech

Thursday, July 28, 1966

In this letter to U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech, Grenville Clark requests a reply to Dr. King's "devastating" public statement in the New York Times about proper enforcement of the 1965 voting rights law.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

Preaching

Dr. King notes three points about preaching.

Response from MLK to Priscilla C. Spagne

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Priscilla C. Spagne for her supportive letter to the Boston Globe. He proclaims that it is important to, "Take every opportunity to make our consciences known to the public."

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Thursday, August 12, 1965

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Letter from Michell Blue to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

A sixth grader from Berkeley, California writes Dr. King to share his supportive view. In closing the young man remarks, "I don't have much to say but thank you."

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

Letter to MLK from Rose Spann

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Rosa Spann of West Kinney Jr. High School, expresses her appreciation to Dr. King by writing a poem called "The Undergrounders."