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Letter from Martin Segal to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Martin Segal, the Dinner Chairman of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King asking him to attend the NUL's Equal Opportunity Dinner and accept membership on the dinner's honorary committee. Writing by Dorothy Cotton, Dr. King's assistant, appears at the top right, stating this was the same day that Dr. King would be attending President Johnson's White House Conference in Washington, D.C.

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

South Africa

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Friday, May 17, 1957
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Detroit, MI, EGYPT

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.

Race Role Urged For Girl Scouts

Saturday, February 3, 1962
Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

De. Harold Taylor, former president of Sarah Lawrence College, challenges the Girl Scouts of America to play a greater role in fighting racism in the South. He also suggest that the Girl Scouts work with the Peace Corps to help spread their teachings internationally.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jonathan Swift’s scathing assessment of man.

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

Barth, Karl

Dr. King comments on Karl Barth's view that Christ assumed fallen human nature.

Kierkegaard (Paradox)

Dr. King quotes Kierkegaard and comments on his view of paradox.

SCLC Mail Log: January 12, 1968

Friday, January 12, 1968

This mail log lists several contact names and businesses that have had mailing correspondences with the SCLC. It is an example of the manner by which Dr. King and the SCLC handled such a large quantity of incoming mail every day.

Letter from Rev. Celestine Fernado to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New York (NY)

The Editor of the Ceylon Churchman, Reverend Celestine Fernando, request a copy of Dr. King's letter from jail to publish in the magazine. Reverend Fernando is certain that this publication is a great message and will allow the church to re-evaluate its work.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

Letter from Septima Clark to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967
South Carolina (SC)

Ms. Clark writes Dr. King with excitement about her granddaughter's accomplishment as a tutor. After saving her earnings of $5.00 per week, Ms. Clark's granddaughter managed to purchase Dr. King a holiday gift complete with special wrapping.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

Thursday, March 9, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Telegram from R. T. Blackwell to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

R. T. Blackwell informs Dr. King that he will be unable to attend an upcoming board meeting due to issues with a farmers cooperative proposal and a funding crisis.

Notecard on the Definition of Time

On this notecard, Dr. King explores the meaning of "Time" according to modern physics and philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Meet the Press Interview with Roy Wilkins and MLK

Sunday, August 25, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, POLAND, CUBA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document is a transcript of NBC’s “Meet the Press” televised press conference with Dr. King and Roy Wilkins. The program is moderated by Ned Brooks. Frank Van Der Linden, Robert MacNeil, Richard Wilson, and Lawrence Spivak are panelists. Some of the topics covered are the goals of the March on Washington, a concern about whether the Civil Rights Movement is pushing too hard, and past political affiliations of Bayard Rustin.

Telegram from Ms. Dora McDonald to A.J. Cervantes

Missouri (MO)

Ms. Dora McDonald responded to a telegram sent from St. Louis Mayor A. J. Cervantes, inviting Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is." The conference, held in St. Louis, MO, was to feature civil rights leaders, mayors and other organizers. Ms. McDonald informed Mayor Cervantes that Dr. King was out of town and to look for a response from Dr. King at a later time.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Thursday, January 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, New York, NY, New York (NY)

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

The New Covenant

Dr. King writes about the New Covenant, according to Jeremiah 31:33.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 1, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Ms. Dora McDonald that all matters pertaining to the published works of Dr. King must pass through her office, as she is the literary agent for Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967
Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

MLK Cited in Damage Suit

Sunday, September 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The New York Times reports that Dr. King is one of the defendants in a $15 Million law suit.

Letter from Mrs. Charles Wilkinson to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965
Illinois (IL), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Fund Committee of Aurora, Illinois sends $1,020 to help provide food, clothing and medicine for needy citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Jainism

Dr. King notes a quote regarding the philosophy of Jainism.

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

God, Man, Sin, and Knowledge

Presented here is a series of notecards that defines an array of topics relating to philosophical and theological perspectives.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
MEXICO, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.