Themes

The Archive

Letter from MLK To W. H. Jackson

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from W. H. Jackson, regarding the Chicago Sunday Evening club. Mr. Jackson receives information on the possible effects his previous letter may have on Dr. King's white friends.

Letter from Clarence Long to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Congressman Long writes Dr. King delighted to inform him of his full support regarding home rule for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Lyman Cady to MLK

Wednesday, July 5, 1967

Lyman Cady, of Westminister Presbyterian Church, expresses his support for Dr. King's recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" He also commends Dr. King's overall leadership throughout the Civil Rights Movement.

Pessimism

Dr. King quotes John Hodgdon Bradley from an article in the December 1932 Atlantic Monthly, “Letter from a Scientist to a Priest.”

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King concerning his visit to North Carolina that was cut short in order to stay out of the media.

Letter from Joseph T. Beaver to MLK

Wednesday, October 1, 1958

Joseph Beaver, Jr. sends his sympathy to Dr. King following the attempt on Dr. King's life. He had originally included a biography of Wendell Phillips Dabney.

Letter from Mary R. Hunt to Mrs.King Regarding Recommendation for Employment

Monday, May 27, 1963

Ms. Hunt, Director of the Extramural Department for Antioch College, sends Mrs. King the resume and photo of Dixie Lee Kisor for employment consideration.

Letter from Lorraine Hughes to MLK Regarding the March on Washington

Mrs. Hughes requests that Dr. King does not proceed with the march in Washington D.C., due to the inability of poor people to conduct a peaceful movement.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

The Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference On Africa sent this letter to update Dr. King and other committee members about plans for the third national biennial leadership conference.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Dr. King sends his condolences for the death of Archbishop Paul Hallinan.

Ebenezer Project Bill

Citizens Trust Company reminds the SCLC of an upcoming payment related to the "Ebenezer Project."

Education

Dr. King outlines his views on education.

Letter from Patterson Charles Jr. to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Patterson Charles, Jr. writes Dora McDonald asking for Dr. King's help regarding alleged racial discrimination in a legal matter.

Telegram from Memphis Sanitation Workers' to MLK

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Members of the Memphis Sanitation Workers' Strike express an urgent need for Dr. King to travel to Memphis in order to aid them in their crusade.

Letter from Al Fann to MLK About Hunter College Program

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

In this letter A1 Fann, director of A1 Fann & Co., gives an overview of the company and it's founding while offering up the services of the company under the direction of Dr. King.

Letter from Joseph A. Scahill to Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Following Dr. King's assassination, Minister Joseph Scahill sent this letter of sympathy to Mrs. King. Minister Scahill mentioned, briefly, his participation in the 1965 Selma campaign with Dr. King and vowed to continue such work.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. to MLK

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. requests the presence of Dr. King to serve on a panel discussing Title VII and Equal Employment. The Department of Labor event also included civil rights lumaniaries such as A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer and Whitney Young. Roosevelt, fifth child of the late president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, served as the Chairman of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from May 26, 1965 to May 11, 1966.

Letter from Tori Bjerkmann to MLK

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Tori Bjerkmann, the editor of PAX magazine, encourages Dr. King to visit Scandinavia for the benefit of the Peace Movement in Norway.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Religion (Ritschl)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Letter from Gloria Fraction to Andrew Young

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Gloria Fraction tells Andrew Young that the National Merit Scholarship Corporation has invited Dr. King and Mrs. King to attend an honorary dinner for the most outstanding Negro students.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Albert Weiss to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

A Wisconsin couple criticizes Dr. King for "outcries" against policy in Vietnam and the "so called peace movement."

Schleiermacher (What Is the Operation of Grace)

Dr. King records a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher's work "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Letter from Dean George W. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, October 19, 1965

George Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of his brother-in-law, Captain Yancey Martin, who is subject to a trial based on previous accusations. Jones hopes that Dr. King is able to utilize his role with the S.C.L.C. to assist Captain Martin.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

Congressman Robert T. Stafford, U. S. Representative from Vermont, informs Dr. King he has signed the discharge petition regarding the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Memo from Stroy Freeman to Englewood Clergy

In this memo, Stroy Freeman informs the Englewood Clergy of Dr. King's attendance for the "withdrawal of accounts campaign" from Chicago City Bank.