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The Crozer Theological Seminary Student Chapel - Order of Service

Friday, January 27, 1950

This order of service outlines the events taken place during student chapel at The Crozier Theological Seminary. The service was guided by presiding student, Fred Eugene Stom, and focused heavily on Christian affirmations and the reciting of the ten commandments.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Progress Report from Robert L. Green to SCLC Staff

Tuesday, September 12, 1967

Mr. Green sends this report to the SCLC staff concerning the Chicago Adult Education Project (CAEP). He writes of the problems and difficulties concerning black communities such as Lawndale, Illinois. He then goes on to describe what the major objective is and how the CAEP can help communities, like those in Lawndale. He proposes "to develop basic, needed educational tools to improve reading, writing, consumer and personal budget skills, and to provide the project with job-seeking skills."

Secrets of a Happy Marriage

Dr. King expounds upon the secrets of a happy marriage. His first point is that the husband and wife must comprehend the nature of sexes. He describes the dichotomy of a man and woman's perception of contentment. The second point Dr. King makes is that the married couple must have an understanding of the nature of marriage itself. He further asserts that a successful marriage must be built on a mutual compromise. The final contention by Dr. King is each individual must instill the sacredness of marriage.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from Mrs. Jena Hobbs

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King received many kind and heartfelt letters of condolence, following the assassination of her husband. This document, in particular, came from Mrs. Lena Hobbs of Brooklyn, NY, who wanted to express the empathy she felt for Mrs. King and her four children. According to Mrs. Hobbs, Dr. King was a great leader that would be dearly missed.

Letter from Alan J. Rankin to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, January 23, 1967

Dr. King informs Alan J. Rankin to communicate to Dora McDonald about his availability to speak at the University Christian Council of McMaster University. The theme of the discussion for the "Teach-In" is going to be "The Religious Dilemma of Twentieth Century Man." Mr. Rankin expects over 2,000 students in attendance and church people from Canada. Furthermore, Mr. Rankin asserts that there will be news coverage on this event.

Mind

Dr. King writes on Herbert Spencer's interpretation of the mind.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.

What the Reformation Took Out

This note card lists the effects of the Reformation on Christian worship. Summarizing the consequences, Dr. King notes, "the intellectual element was overemphasized."

Letter from Tom Cochran to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Tom Cochran, President of the Young Democrats at the University of Georgia School of Law writes to invite Dr. King to speak as a lecturer. According to Mr. Cochran, the political climate in the state of Georgia has increased the urgency for Dr. King to speak at the institution.

Letter from M. A. Lockhart to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1963

M. A. Lockhart writes Dr. King to express pleasure in speaking with Dr. King during his visit to New York. Lockhart expresses interest in the development of the Selective Patronage program and asks that Dr. King make contact if he is in New York.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Letter from Steve Adams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Adams devotes his support to Dr. King and the nonviolent movement. He mistakenly expresses condolences to Dr. King on the death of his father. However, Dr. King's father "Daddy King" would not pass away until November of 1984.

Colwell, Ernest Cadman

Dr. King references Ernest Caldwell's book "Toward Better Theological Education."

Itinerary for MLK with Handwritten Notes

This itinerary from 1964 details Dr. King's traveling schedule and contains his handwritten notes with regard to discovering one's purpose in life.

"Attorney's Arrest is Protested"

Thursday, August 18, 1966

This Washington Post article, entitled "Attorney's Arrest is Protested", talks about Arthur Kinoy's arrest and the complications that aroused as a result of it.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Orientation Agenda

This document outlines the schedule of events during the A. Philip Randolph Institute orientation, an organization focused on racial equality and economic justice.

Telegram from George Romney to MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967

George Romney telegrams Dr. King to inform him of his inability to attend a conference.

Letter from Donald Lincoln Cook to MLK

Monday, January 24, 1966

Donald Cook lauds Dr. King's efforts to persuade military forces to leave Vietnam. In response to a speech on Vietnam given by Dr. King, Cook agrees that "the Negro should have special interest in the plight of the Vietnamese." He further encourages Dr. King to stand firm in his position to bring a moral conscience to the nation.

Letter from Florence Read to MLK

Wednesday, May 5, 1965

Florence Read informs Dr. King that she received news of his Nobel Peace Prize while traveling in the Middle East. She encloses articles from The Jerusalem Times and The Daily Star of Beirut for Dr. King's records.

Letter from William H. Booth to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Commission on Human Rights Chairman William Booth invites Dr. King and a designated representative to a conference in New York entitled, "Testing Human Potential - New Techniques for Selecting Employees from Minority Groups."

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Letter from Sam Jones to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968

In this letter, dated January 11, 1968, Sam Jones expresses his disappointment in Dr. King for not acknowledging his letters. Jones wrote several letters to King asking for assistance in the struggle to restrain the Florida State Legislature's "Lily White" body from writing a new State Constitution.

Receipt from the University of Bridgeport to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

This is a receipt from James Halsey to Dr. King for a donation to the University of Bridgeport's development fund.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King to appear in the first installment of a series of televised discussions entitled "The American Experience."

Letter from Dave Dellinger to MLK

Saturday, April 8, 1967

Dave Dellinger outlines the events and requirements for the rally, sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, to be held in New York City, New York on April 15th, 1967.

Messianic Hope

Dr. King writes these notes on "Messianic Hope" from Isaiah 11:6 and 11:8. He quotes Ludwig Feuerbach, a German philosopher, from his work "The Essence of Religion."