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Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 12, 1965

Joan Daves informs Miss McDonald that attachments include carbon copies of checks that were "in question."

Letter from William M. Grayson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, March 13, 1962

William M. Grayson, President of a chapter of the NAACP in West Virginia, requests information regarding Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements for 1963.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Letter from Halevy H. Simmons to MLK

Wednesday, October 3, 1962

New York-based architect Halevy H. Simmons offers his professional services to rebuild Negro churches in the state of Georgia.These pillars of Negro culture were targeted throughout the state in a series of racially motivated hate crimes.

Letter from MLK to Edwin and Louise Flowers

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Edwin C. and Mrs. Louise M. Flowers from Dr. King, he wanted to personally thanked Mr. Edwin and Mrs. Flowers for their generous contribution to SCLC and to express his appreciation and gratitude for their support toward the Civil Right Movement.

Three Stages of Christological Controversy

Dr. King lists three stages of Christological controversy. The third is the "relation" between the former two.

Letter from Marguerite Munson to MLK

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Mrs.Munson writes Dr.King to ask for his assistance in finding a lawyer that is not corrupted by the government.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to John Lewis of SNCC

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Ralph D. Abernathy, Vice President and Financial Secretary-Treasurer of the SCLC, sends a check as a gift to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC. Abernathy also informs Lewis of the SCLC's financial situation, which prevents the organization from making a loan to SNCC.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Invitation from the Ambassador of Ethiopia to MLK

The Ambassador of Ethiopia extends an invitation for Dr. King to attend a reception honoring Haile Selassie I, the Emperor of Ethiopia.

Letter from Joan Daves to Seong Hak Lee

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Joan Daves responds to a request to translate Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Why We Can't Wait" into the Korean language. She conveys Dr. King's gratitude about such an interest while also expressing hesitancy in granting permission immediately. The project can only be green lighted if specific procedures are followed which Daves lays out in her response.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

A Contentious Telephone Message

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Wiley Bell

Thursday, July 25, 1963

In this letter, Dr. King writes a thank you note to Mr. Bell for his support concerning "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Alversia Dunkley to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mrs. Dunkley writes Dr. King hoping to receive permission to publish her song, "Man of God," about Dr. King. She also requests contact information for the family of "Miss Viola" to receive permission to publish a poem entitled "Viola."

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from R. A. Peterson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This letter of condolence, originating from a Bank of America executive in San Francisco, CA and addressed to Mrs. King. The writer expresses hope that Dr. King's work and legacy will carry forward in his tradition of nonviolence.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

Memorandum from Dr. King

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

Dr. King addresses this memorandum to the organizers of a "Stall In" at the World's Fair. He advises against the demonstration and only advises it when "persistent attempts at good faith negotiations have completely failed."

Letter from Prime Minister Hugh Shearer to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967

In this letter, newly appointed Jamaican Prime Minister Hugh Shearer thanks Dr. King for his "kind congratulations." Shearer goes on to ask for prayers of success on behalf of Jamaica and its people.

The Synagogue Council of America

This pamphlet provides information on the Synagogue Council of America, including its goals and financing methods. The Council was formed to unite the orthodox, conservative and reform Jewish movements into a single group.

Letter from James H. Scheuer to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

James H. Scheuer, a representative of the United States Congress, informs Dr. King about the dismissal of the Mississippi challenge. Despite this action, Scheuer asserts that the attention received is a victory within itself. He concludes by stating "We must all work together to insure maximum enforcement of the Voting Rights Bill".

Doctrines

Dr. King records a definition of the word "doctrine."

MLK's Speech Notes

In these speech notes, Dr. King references the plight of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union and the silent betrayal of onlookers. John Donne is quoted in his famous excerpt, "No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main."

Those Who Fail To Speak

Saturday, June 5, 1965

Dr. King discusses the stagnant progress of desegregation despite the fact that a decade has passed since the Supreme Court's ruling on Brown v. Board of Education.

Letter from San Francisco Vietnam Committee to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

The San Francisco Vietnam Committee invites Dr. King to speak for their anti-Vietnam War rally. Dr. King would begin making statements against the Vietnam War during the fall of 1965.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Letter from Joan Daves to Harry H. Wachtel

Friday, November 6, 1964

Joan Daves sends Mr. Watchel a copy of a proposed Memorandum of Agreement for the distribution of hand lettered copies of Martin Luther King's speech I Have A Dream.

Letter to Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Here Mr. Hanson conveys his appreciation for the permission to include words from Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", in his performance "The Rebels".

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.