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Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Letter from Bill Daniels to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 2, 1967

Bill Daniels, the editorial cartoonist for WSB Radio and Television, responded to a letter he received from Ms. Dora McDonald concerning a cartoon. He suggested that she have her television adjusted, as the cartoon is "by no means a negro."

Letter from A. K. Magugu to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

The Office of Kenya National Celebrations congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. In addition, the author encloses an invitation card in hopes that the Reverend may attend their Anniversary and Republic Day Celebrations.

Letter from Lula Belle Williams to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

Lula Williams writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help to pay her rent before she is evicted.

Letter from MLK to Miss Read

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Miss Read's "interest in and support of our work and the American Negroes [sic] struggle for freedom and dignity."

Note - Leewellyn Daniel

The note, shown here, was written by Leewellyn Daniel, of Chicago, Illinois. The handwriting simply states, "Legal action concerning being arrested." However, the addressee of this note and the date it was written is unknown.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Letter from MLK to Adhemar de Barros

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Dr. King declines Governor Adhemar de Barros' invitation to attend the conference for recognition of Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King's work on the Right-to-Vote Campaign in the State of Alabama has monopolized his time for several months.

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

Friday, September 6, 1963

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."


Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

Royalty Statement

Friday, June 30, 1967

This statement provides figures of terms and earned royalties for the German-language edition "Strength to Love."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Friday, September 11, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Milnor Alexander

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the kick-off celebration for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom 50th Anniversary. A previous engagement in another section of the country prevents Dr. King from accepting. However, Dr. King would later speak for the organization in Philadelphia. Coretta Scott King was a key member and sponsor of the league.


Dr. King notes three points about preaching.

Anonymous Letter from Jail - Birmingham, AL

In this letter an anonymous writer shares his gratitude for all the support extended as Dr. King and his colleagues were incarcerated at a jail in Birmingham, AL.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

The Hard or the Easy Way?

Thursday, October 5, 1961

The Southern Regional Council discusses the topics of school segregation and integration in specific southern states and counties, especially Yancey County, North Carolina.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Anwar Katib, the Governor of Jerusalem, states that he is pleased to hear about Dr. King's decision to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He also tells Dr. King that his visit will be a blessing and a historical event.

MLK Speaks on Church Bombing in Birmingham, AL

Monday, September 16, 1963

Dr. King speaks on the bombing at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church that killed four girls in Birmingham, Alabama.

Presidential Invitation to White House Luncheon

Tuesday, June 5, 1962

President Kennedy invites Dr. King to attend a White House Luncheon on the occasion of the visit of Archbishop Makarios, the President of the Republic of Cyprus.

Telegram from N. K. Steele to MLK

N. K. Steele, on behalf of Bethel Baptist Church, offers prayers to Dr. King during his stay in the Care County Jail in Americus, Georgia.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Nomination Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. King

Tuesday, September 10, 1963

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays notifies Dr. King that he has nominated him for the Florina Lasker Civil Liberties Award.

Letter to MLK from Immaculate Heart College

Saturday, October 31, 1964

Sister Mary Williams, President of the Immaculate Heart College, congratulates Dr. King on behalf of her faculty and students on his selection to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.


"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Notes Regarding Marriage

The handwritten outline conveyed Dr. King's view on marriage and what is required to maintain a happy union.

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach writes to Dr. King acknowledging his suggestion of using the Greenville Air Force Base to help alleviate the economic problems of Negro families in the Mississippi Delta. Katzenbach states that most of the land is no longer leased by the U.S. government but that Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1965 would apply to any educational programs.

News from the American Jewish Committee

Friday, February 23, 1968

A seminar will be held in New York concerning the Christian and Jewish perspectives on the "meaning of Israel in the wake of the recent Mid-East crisis." The newsletter also states who will speak and what qualifications they posses.