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The Future of Integration

Wednesday, November 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

Letter from MLK to Michael Swann

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, Scotland on selected dates in 1967 and 1968. He assures the recipient of the letter that he is grateful for the invitation, however, he states that he already has commitments on the proposed dates.

Letter from Colin W. Bell to MLK

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

Colin W. Bell invites Dr. King to deliver a lecture during the anniversary activities of the American Friends Service Committee. This letter also includes Dora McDonald's shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Gertrude Jimerson to MLK

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Gertrude Jimerson requests biographical information for Dr. King.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Henry Luce for the invitation to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine. However, due to another engagement on the other side of the U.S., Dr. King regretfully cannot commit to come to the dinner.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Supporters

Ralph Abernathy, Treasurer of the SCLC, informs SCLC supporters of Dr. King's newly published book, "Strength To Love." He explains that Dr. King has assigned a large portion of the royalties to further the work of the SCLC and urges supporters to order the book.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

Bayard Rustin writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference sponsored by the A. Philip Randolph Education Fund. The conference focuses on "The Role of Press in a Period of Social Crisis."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Letter from Eleanor Lawrence to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967

Eleanor Lawrence thanks Dr. King for his bold opposition to the Vietnam War. She understands that Dr. King's views transcend all across the globe and believes that Dr. King would make a perfect peace candidate for President in the 1968 elections.

Letter to MLK from Rual Boles

Wednesday, March 8, 1967

Mr. Boles, a businessman in Chicago, thanks Dr. King, Rev. Jackson, and the SCLC staff for contributing to the success of his struggling business. He is also appreciative for the efforts of Operation Breadbasket in equipping Negro-owned small businesses to effectively compete in the American economy.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Letter from Pastor R. L. Crady to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965

Pastor Crady expresses concern to Dr. King that the civil rights movement mayl be in vain, because segregationist organizations can use the umbrella of religious protection, along with taxpayer funds, to back up their convictions.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

Thursday, January 10, 1957

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

Dancer, singer, and actress Josephine Baker writes Dr. King to share her views on the current political climate of the United States of America. Her belief is that the best chance of retaining and continuing the progress made by John F. Kennedy is to re-elect Lyndon B. Johnson for President and Robert Kennedy as a New York Senator.

Letter from Prince Johannes of Bohemia to MLK

Sunday, December 17, 1967

Prince Johannes, claimant to the throne of Bohemia, requests Dr. King's participation in the Presidium of the World Government.

Letter from Bernard Roche to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Roche asks Dr. King whether he has considered that whites not only intimidate and murder African Americans, but also each other. He argues that whites don't treat anyone any worse than they treat themselves.

Letter from Moses Walker to MLK

Saturday, January 30, 1965

Dr. King moves his family to Chicago to assist with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Walker writes to Dr. King on behalf of the Republican party of the twenty fourth ward. He thanks Dr. King for choosing the twenty fourth ward as the starting point for his campaign to end slum housing. Mayor Daley eventually negotiated with Dr. King to build better housing and to make mortgages available regardless of race.

Dictator

Dr. King reveals the definition of a dictator according to Plato.

Telegram from St. James Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Rev. W.C. Barnett, pastor of St. James Baptist Church, sent this telegram expressing well wishes, from his congregation, towards Dr. King.

Letter from J. T. Brooks to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

Monday, November 16, 1953

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church representative J. T. Brooks conveys the church's interest in considering Dr. King for the pastorate.

Letter to MLK from Rev. A.D. King

Monday, April 2, 1962

Dr. King's brother, Rev. A.D. Williams King, wrote this letter to Dr. King, thanking him for his participation, at the First Baptist Church Installation Services in Birmingham.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Friday, July 31, 1964

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Georgia Council on Human Relations

The author informs the readers about the poverty problem in Georgia. They claim that the AFDC or "Aid to Families of Dependent Children" needs improvement. The author also mentions issues such as unemployment, education and voter registration.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

Letter from Hubert Williams to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

A member of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the increased tension between Negros and New York police.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Field Staff

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Tom Offenburger released this memo to members of SCLC's field staff concerning the advertisement of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.