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Letter from Marshall Bean to MLK

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Marshall Bean, a public school teacher suffering from cancer, writes Dr. King requesting an autographed picture and a "few words of joy."

Promotional Article for Why We Can't Wait

This Harper released publication contains a preview of the religious books to be published in the summer and fall of 1964. Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" is featured with the byline "The 'Man of the Year' writes the 'Book of the Year'."

Birthday Card to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Margaret, which includes a verse from the book of Matthew.

Program for the SCLC Mass Meeting

Wednesday, October 1, 1958

This program is for a SCLC Mass Meeting that took place, at the Norfok Municipal Auditorium, on October 1, 1958.

Letter from MLK to Rev. and Mrs. Gardiner Day

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Rev. and Mrs. Day for their contribution to the SCLC. He expresses delight in knowing that the Days' donation will help to empower employment initiatives and voting rights programs in the United States. The letter was written in the weeks following the signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

God

Dr. King uses a series of scriptures from the Book of Psalms and I Chronicles to show God's abiding love and faithfulness.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.

Letter from TIME Magazine to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

James Shepley, publisher of TIME Magazine, thanks Dr. King for his editorial contributions to the magazine in the past year.

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

Letter from Pastor F. Peter Sabey to MLK

Monday, April 26, 1965

Pastor F. Peter Sabey of the Lafayette College Church invites Dr. King to give a sermon at the church. Sabey states that he will cover the expenses for Dr. King and give an honorarium if he accepts.

Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines

Saturday, March 23, 1985

The Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines sponsored, Future Impact, a program to promote economic development for the company. The program also aids in enhancing the skills of the company's black employees.

Letter from Eleanor A. Lofton of the Pittsburgh Courier to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Eleanor Lofton, Acting Publisher for the Pittsburgh Courier, asks Dr. King to include a message for the "Brotherhood" edition of their publication. Lofton explains that they are seeking "all men of goodwill" to be a part of the edition and that they will be anticipating his timely response.

Letter from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy Forwarded to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964

John L. Murphy writes Dr. King to forward him a letter for the Reverend from US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that his office received in error. In the forwarded letter, Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his willingness to contribute to a series of oral interviews for the John F. Kennedy library.

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Fernando DeEquidazu to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Students from Spain write Dr. King, showing their appreciation for his leadership to the Civil Rights Movement, and asks if Dr. King can supply them with articles for magazines in Spain.

Letter from Thelma Berlack Boozer to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Thelma Berlack Boozer, President of Gothamettes, Inc. writes Dr. King sending a contribution of $150. In closing, Boozer requests a receipt or prompt acknowledgement of the contribution.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

Anonymous Letter from Jail - Birmingham, AL

In this letter an anonymous writer shares his gratitude for all the support extended as Dr. King and his colleagues were incarcerated at a jail in Birmingham, AL.

Letter from Bob Detterick to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Bob Detterick, chairman for "Choice '68" organization at Western New Mexico University, requests that Dr. King send poster, pictures, pamphlets to promote him as the next presidential candidate.

Eternal Objects

Dr. King cites Alfred North Whitehead's book "Science and the Modern World."

Letter from Franklin W. Thomas to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Franklin W. Thomas writes to Dr. King to apologize for the delay in honoring his participation in the Hungry Club Forum 20th Anniversary Series.

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. W.E. Anderson

Friday, June 9, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to the wife of Dr. Anderson and assures her that they will continue the noble endeavors that Dr. Anderson began.

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes James A. Froude's "Short Studies on Great Subjects."

Letter from R. Elliot of B.M. Heede, Inc. to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

This letter is an inquiry and request for feedback on the redevelopment plans of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

MLK Statement on Voter Registration

Dr. King urges the African American community to register and vote. He outlines the importance of voting by making historcial references relevant to the community.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.