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Statement on the Indictment of MLK

Thursday, March 3, 1960
Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Orangeburg, SC, Birmingham, AL, Nashville, TN, Tallahassee, FL, Little Rock, AR

The "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr." issued this statement, accusing the state of Alabama of falsely distorting Dr. King's 1958 income tax return in an attempt to indict him.

Letter from MLK to Don Blaine

Friday, November 26, 1965
Kansas (KS)

Dr. King shows delight in Mr. Don Blaine's idea of promoting a "peace caravan" to travel around the United States. He requests that Blaine further develop the idea and contact heads of various peace organizations to assist in the endeavor. Dr. King also displays his willingness to participate in the caravan.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Memorandum to Files

Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

Law of Love

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on the place of the "law of love" in relation to human history.

Nonviolent Leaders

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Save the Children of Mississippi Resolutions

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Barbara Greene issues a memo for the Ad Hoc Committee to Save the Children of Mississippi that includes resolutions to protest federal funding cutbacks of Head Start programs in Mississippi and interpretation of the Green Amendment regarding maximizing participation in such programs by the poor. She attaches a copy of a telegram sent to Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Letter from MLK to Mary Wood

Monday, April 18, 1960

Dr. King wrote this letter to Mrs. Mary D. Wood to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes that he appreciated her including comments on his book, "Stride Toward Freedom," and that he's glad that she found it helpful.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

Chicago, IL

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.

The True Nature of Religion

Dr. King discusses the true nature of religion as both an inward and outward experience. The subject "He" is unidentified.

Holiday Card from the King Family

This is a holiday card from the King Family.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Tuesday, February 18, 1964
New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
New York, NY

This New York writer castigates Dr. King and refers to him as "the worst phoney [sic] in the country."

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Friday, January 26, 1968
VIETNAM

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

Negotiation Now!

VIETNAM, New York, NY

Negotiation Now is a national citizens' campaign that supports new initiatives to end the Vietnam War. The campaign aligns with the Secretary General of the United Nations, U Thant, who discusses the necessary "cessation" of bombing in North Vietnam to bring about a peaceful political compromise. This flier shares the campaign's views and offers a section for donation information.

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Letter from Polly G. to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962
Berkeley, CA, Atlanta, GA

Polly G. writes Dr. King informing him that her class is creating reports on famous people. She has chosen to write her report on Dr. King and asks him to assist her by sending some additional material along with a photograph.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967
Connecticut (CT)

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Letter from SNCC Executive Committee to MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

John Lewis and Silas Norman of SNCC write Dr. King to address their organization's grievances with the SCLC, specifically the SCLC's lack of cooperation in the Selma Voting Rights campaign. Members of SNCC state their disagreement with the march planned for March 7, 1965 because "the objectives of the march do not justify the danger and the resources involved." Lewis and Norman request a meeting with Dr. King to discuss reconciliation between SNCC and the SCLC.

Telegram from Robert L. Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Robert L. Lucas, the Chairman of the Chicago branch for the Congress On Racial Equality, invites Dr. King and his staff to return to Chicago, Illinois to assist in the struggle for quality integrated education.

Newsday: Poor Listeners

Tuesday, November 15, 1966
New York (NY), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ)

The writer issues an indictment of the current Presidential administration for its failure to listen to others' views of the situation in Vietnam.

Christmas Card from the King Family

New Jersey (NJ)

Coretta Scott King sends out a Christmas card from herself and her children.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Virginia (VA)

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Marilyn Coulter to MLK

Saturday, October 26, 1963
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Marilyn Coulter asks Dr. King to provide information for her research paper entitled "Segregation."

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), VIETNAM, Selma, AL

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Letter from Arthur L. Kinsolving to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Arthur Kingsolving sends his thanks to Dr. King for remembering him and sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from David C. Morton to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968
California (CA)

David C. Morton, Campus Coordinator at Biola College, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and other campaign materials for Choice '68.