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Letter to J. Avery from MLK

Friday, May 13, 1966
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses embarrassment because of his late response to a telegram requesting his presence and explains that the mistake is due to an overworked, understaffed office. The tone of the letter conveys the personal concern King feels for each of the numerous individuals who seek his participation in events around the country.

Philadelphia Inquirer: Balance of Payments 'Cure' Was Devised in Near-Panic

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Wisconsin (WI), JAPAN, Washington, D.C.

This article by Rowland Evans and Robert Novak criticizes a proposed 2% border tax on imported goods. They argue that President Johnson's support of such a measure is reckless and will cause economic repercussions around the world.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to MLK

Monday, November 22, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Carey McWilliams, Editor of "The Nation," reminds Dr. King that it is nearly time to publish his annual article. McWilliams also requests that the timing of the article correspond with the beginning of the new session of Congress.

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

"How To Make History"

Georgia (GA)

Mr. Eisenman acknowledges the irony of how America, which was created after a war of liberation, has now gone against everything it was founded upon.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Draft Letter from MLK Regarding Grand Freedom March

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King addresses his "Brother-In-Christ" requesting assistance for an up and coming March for Freedom held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He makes three requests including financial and social support.

Letter from Mr. Herbert. H. Fisher to MLK

Saturday, July 17, 1965
Chicago, IL

Mr. Fisher, President of the Chatham Avalon Park Community Council, provides an organized detailed account of community concerns. More specifically, he addresses various social and political issues regarding schools, housing, insufficient leadership, and government services.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965
ITALY

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Fundraising Letter from MLK Addressed to Friends

New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, South Africa, Chicago, IL

Dr. King writes this letter on behalf of the Workers Defense League, requesting funds to assist six South African youth who seek political protection in the U.S.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962
SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Financial Report of SCLC

Friday, May 19, 1967

This document is the SCLC's summary of income and disbursements for the fiscal period of May 15-19, 1967.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

Birmingham, AL

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

Proposal: Pilgrimage to Rome

ITALY, Washington, D.C., Geneva, Switzerland, Berkeley, CA, Los Angeles, CA

The Pilgrimage to Rome proposal addresses peace issues for an audience with Pope John. The proposal elaborates on the different aspects of the pilgrimage including political approaches, the involvement of women, arrangements, meetings and more. The proposal also entails excerpts from the first responses to the pilgrimage.

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL)

Upon the death of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, Dr. King wrote this epitaph, calling her "a symbol of world citizenship." In addition, Dr. King commends Mrs. Roosevelt for her commitment to humanity.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Progress

Dr. King writes that progress has to do with value in human life.

On Being A Good Neighbor

ISRAEL

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Tillich in sketching his views on man's freedom in relation to destiny.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Baruch Spinoza's "Epistle 21" to Henry Oldenburg.

Conscience

Dr. King ponders the meaning of the word 'conscience.' He questions the nature of conscience and ultimately sees it as a necessary sense of obligation that makes a difference in the life of a civilization.

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

Monday, September 24, 1962
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

President Kennedy compliments Dr. King and his organization for their persistent push for equal rights in America.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Johnson

Dr. King responds to Mr. Johnson's request for a recommendation by writing that he is honored by the request, but he does not believe that he can write a proper recommendation given the absence of their acquaintance. Dr. King makes suggestions for alternative recommendations and offers his "encouragement and support."

Address to the Montgomery Improvement Association

Monday, December 5, 1955
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King discusses the inequality in America and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He says that he will work to eliminate discrimination in Montgomery and he encourages the audience to participate and actively seek change as well.

Letter from MLK to Gordon R. Pollard

Thursday, January 6, 1966
CANADA

Dr. King expresses his embarrassment in his late response to Mr. Pollard's letter regarding a speaking engagement at the University of Victoria. Dr. King shares his gratitude for the invitation but regretfully declines due to the fact that he has accepted his maximum number of engagements for the time period.

God

Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.