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Power for the Powerless - SCLC's Basic Challenge

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA), VIETNAM

This report outlines the objectives of the SCLC, as well as programs and projects led by various departments. It also includes a staff listing and organizational chart.

Letter from Terrie to MLK

Saturday, March 2, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The author informs Dr. King of her
inability to continue working for the SCLC due to conflicting personal issues and emotional instability. She asserts that the work of the SCLC is too important for her to remain "jumping around in the organization." She also informs Dr. King that the SCLC is family and that she is only leaving for personal reasons. Lastly, she requests that other primary members of the organization are informed of this departure.

Letter from Clarence Portericker to Mrs. King

New York, NY

Clarence Portericker, a student in New York, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King hoping that Dr. King's dream will come true.

Letter from Katherine H. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, March 27, 1965
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Katherine H. Jackson writes Dr. King on behalf of the late Reverend James J. Reeb. The Marin County Board of Supervisors declared March 20, James J. Reeb Memorial Day. Contributions were received throughout the county and forwarded to the SCLC. In addition, Jackson invites Dr. King to Marin County at a later, more convenient date.

Definition of History

Dr. King explains a definition of history.

Vietnam Peace Parade Flyer

New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, New York (NY)

This flyer, issued by the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, advertises to New Yorkers to head to D.C. for an anti-war demonstration on October 21st and 22nd. Calling for citizens to 'Confront the Warmakers in Washington,' this flyer features a young boy with a sign reading "Lyndon - I'm too young to die."

Letter from Earl M. Smith to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966
URUGUAY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, BRAZIL

Earl Smith requests an answer from Dr. King about his invite to speak in Montevideo, Uruguay.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington (WA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), CANADA, San Francisco, CA, ITALY, Detroit, MI, Delaware (DE), Louisville, KY, SOUTH KOREA, Washington, D.C., KENYA, Tennessee (TN)

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

Man the Sinner

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York, NY, NIGERIA

In a letter to Dr. King, Mr. Brown encloses an article pertaining to Nigeria being on the brink of disintegration and civil war.

Letter from Illinois High School Student Beth Allen to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

High school student Beth Allen writes Dr. King inquiring about how she can contribute to the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."

Walk for Freedom

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Monday, April 8, 1968
Minnesota (MN)

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Saturday, June 30, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, expresses his gratitude for the copy of the letter Dr. King sent to the editor of The Christian Century. Mays also inquires about the response of the editor.

Albany Movement Statement

Sunday, July 1, 1962
Albany, GA

This statement is written on behalf of people of faith who have come to support the Albany Movement. The ills experienced by the Negro community in Albany are rooted in racial separation, it says. The document requests a meeting with the City Commission to review their response to peaceful protest, clarification of the City’s position on an ICC ruling on segregated buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to make recommendations on desegregation.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC)

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.

Letter from Edgar E. Evans to MLK

Alabama (AL)

Edgar E. Evans communicates with Dr. King to discuss stocks regarding the Farm and City Enterprises, Inc. Mr. Evans further informs Dr. King of the Negro Citizen's lack of confidence within the corporation. He continues to expound on the financial inconsistencies within the organization.

Letter from Reverend V. W. Glanton to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967
New York (NY)

Reverend V. W. Glanton encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC after receiving communications about voter registration initiatives in the South.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Friday, February 19, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955
New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ, Washington, D.C.

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Immortality

Dr. King takes notes regarding immortality. In his notes, he references Johann Fichte's definition of ethics. He also discusses human duty as it relates to immortality.

Letter from Ann B. Houston to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, VIETNAM

In this letter Ann B. Houston of the American Friends Service Committee offers her gratitude for a contribution received from the Benevolence Club of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She further states that the funds have gone to good use in South Vietnam towards the manufacture of artificial limbs using local immigrated labor.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia, writes to Mr. Walker regarding Dr. King's refusal to reveal the name of the persons recommending and interviewing Jack O'Dell.

Letter from MLK to Frank Carlson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Kansas Senator Frank Carlson to applaud his vote for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Sword That Heals

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), INDIA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
FRANCE, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dr. King receives a telegram from Duncan Wood in Geneva, Switzerland concerning upcoming international trips.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), California (CA)

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.