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Letter to the Editor regarding Harris Wofford


This letter to the editor comes to the defense of Harris Wofford, civil rights advisor to President Kennedy, who was inaccurately described in print.

Letter from James Allen to MLK

Wednesday, April 6, 1966

James Allen expresses his opinion of the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King describes the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference involvement in the civil rights campaign, May-July of 1964, in St. Augustine, Florida. The excerpted article is taken from the SCLC Newsletter.


Dr. King writes on angels, according to Daniel 10:13, 21, and 12:1.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from San Francisco Vietnam Committee to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

The San Francisco Vietnam Committee invites Dr. King to speak for their anti-Vietnam War rally. Dr. King would begin making statements against the Vietnam War during the fall of 1965.

The Martin Luther King Column

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King talks about Montgomery, Alabama and the accomplishments that they have made toward civil rights.

Letter from Hazel Olivier to MLK

Tuesday, February 1, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Hazel H. Olivier of Chicago, in a letter dated February 1, 1966, asks Dr. King to help her retain an apartment building on Yale Avenue that she purchased in 1957. She lived there 5 years before being told there were serious violations. Three years after spending substantial funds and being informed by the inspector that everything was in compliance, she was cited with additional violations and told there were no reports of her earlier remedial actions. She wonders how the previous white owner was permitted to sell if there were violations. Mrs.

Letter from Albert Turner to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Albert Turner requests financial assistance from Dr. King to aid with the voting campaign against Governor Wallace.

Letter from Stanley M. Voice to MLK

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Stanley M. Voice writes to inform MLK why he is withdrawing support for SCLC in 1967. He thinks Negro leaders need a unified sense of direction.

Letter from Alfred K. Barr to MLK

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Alfred Barr, of the Cosmopolitan Club of the University of Georgia Athens, invites Dr. King to speak at their campus, citing the fact that Dr. King was the only Nobel Prize winner from Georgia.

Letter from Gulf Oil Corporation to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
Pittsburgh, PA

Craig Thompson, Director of Public Relations, informs Dr. King of Gulf Oil's discontent regarding the confusion of objectives surrounding his role as a world peacemaker. He informs Dr. King that their continued support will be provided to other respected Negro organizations "devoting their energies to the fundamental issues of the Negro's place in America."

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

Letter from Oakleigh Ross Bush to MLK

Saturday, June 25, 1966
Texas (TX)

Oakleigh Ross Bush discusses the significance of author Joel Candler Harris with Dr. King. Bush also tells Dr. King about a book of Harris' work, which Bush edited. Bush currently is trying to get the book published, but needs a forward written by "an eminent American Negro" in order for publishers to accept the manuscript.

Letter from Mrs. Bonnie Cohen to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Bonnie Cohen, a senior at Eastern Michigan University, writes to Rev. Abernathy requesting his thoughts on the problem of "crime in the streets."

Letter from Chandrasekhar and Gouri Bhattacharya to MLK

Saturday, December 25, 1965

Chandrasekhar and Gouri Bhattacharya of Calcutta, India request that Dr. King send blessings to their daughter Chirashree on her second birthday.

Letter from Debbie Steiner to MLK

Sunday, May 17, 1964
New Jersey (NJ)

Debbie Steiner of Willburn, New Jersey tells Dr. King how she was moved by his article in Life magazine, which she calls "a realistic summary of why the Negro can not wait." She explains her discontent with prejudice and inquires about how young people can influence change.

Letter from Mrs. William Henry Slakey to MLK

California (CA)

Mrs. Slakey writes Dr. King to commend his letter denouncing the term "Black Power." In the post script, she requests a personal response instead of a form letter.

Letter from Congressman F. Bradford Morse to MLK

Monday, October 4, 1965
Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA)

Massachusetts 5th District Representative F. Bradford Morse expresses his disappointment that the Home Rule bill for the District of Columbia was not approved. He informs Dr. King that further action is unlikely to be taken in 1965.

The Misuse of Prayer

Monday, July 17, 1950

In this sermon delivered at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King elaborates on the proper uses of prayer and how it should be a supplemental asset.

Letter from J. L. Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Minister Roberts writes to Dr. King expressing his support of the Civil Rights Movement along with making a donation to the SCLC.

Nature and Perception

Dr. King discusses his philosophical perspective on perception and nature.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

New Jersey (NJ)

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Telegram from Frederick Dennard to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Reverend Frederick Dennard, Executive Director of the Harlem Interfaith Counseling Service, invites Dr. King to speak at a fundraising banquet.

Letter from Jean Rand to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Jean Rand writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech regarding peace in Vietnam and sends him a monetary contribution.

Letter to Twelve Southern Governors

Dr. King addresses twelve southern governors regarding the urgency of a unification between the Negro community and government leaders. Dr. King requests a meeting between the governors and himself to address and resolve their issues concerning race relations.

Letter from Ryan & Ebert Law Firm to the SCLC about Will of Carl A. Ryan

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
Minnesota (MN)

In this letter to Dr. King and the SCLC, the Executives of the Ryan, Ryan & Ebert Law Firm reward the organization with a check for $960.00 on behalf of the last Will and Testament of Carl A. Ryan

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about Howard Address

Monday, June 7, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson expressing appreciation and admiration for his speech at the Howard University Commencement.