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"ALGERIA"

Letter From Don Slaiman

Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Don Slaiman of the AFL-CIO encloses a brochure titled "The Right to Strike and General Welfare." This brochure, which was developed by the Committee on the Church and Economic Life of the National Council of Churches, address problems and proposes solution to the Labor Movement.

Telegram from MLK to Katie B. Whickham

Thursday, July 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King welcomes Mrs. Whickham and the National Beauty Culturist League to Atlanta. He also thanks Mrs. Whickham for the support that her organizations has given to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Man

Dr. King records one atheist’s perspective on man.

Letter from Gail Lamb to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Gail Lamb requests information from Dr. King for her research on prejudice, especially on "manifestations, kinds, and objects of prejudice."

Draft of Speech for SCLC in Nashville

Nashville, TN

Dr. King is outlining a speech he later presented to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Nashville.

Black Power and Liberation: A Communist View

New York (NY), New York, NY

Arnold Johnson, Public Relations Director of Communist Party U. S. A, requests commentary on Claude Lightfoot's pamphlet "A Note on Black Power and Liberation." The pamphlet has sparked discussions in the public press and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
San Francisco, CA

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Connecticut (CT)

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C., California (CA), Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Sin

Dr. King provides insight on the "secret of sin."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

ISRAEL

The author objects to Dr. King's journey to Jerusalem with his followers. He also expresses his perception of the Negro race.

Marx

Dr. King quotes an unknown source on Marx.

Acceptance Letter from Rollan Henry of Tuskegee Institute to Scott B. Smith

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
Tuskegee, AL

In this letter, Mr.Henry informs Mr.Smith that he has been accepted to Tuskegee Institute.

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, GHANA, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, TANZANIA, NIGERIA, ANGOLA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA, Georgia (GA)

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Awake America

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A poem by Jerry Peace calls for Americans to wake up and address current world issues.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, July 29, 1965
Atlanta, GA

SCLC Vice President-At-Large, Ralph D. Abernathy, grants permission for the release of information to Jesse B. Blayton. Mr. Blayton was Georgia's first black Certified Public Accountant.

Letter from a Supporter of MLK

An anonymous person pleads with Dr. King to not accept a rumored government job that was offered to him, in exchange of his plans to alleviate poverty.

Letter from Svend Erik Stybe to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963
Montgomery, AL, DENMARK, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, ISRAEL, GERMANY

The president of the Danish Students' Association invites Dr. King to Denmark to give an address to Danish students.

Appreciation Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Maurice Dawkins expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's statement that encouraged the Congress to support the war on poverty. He also expresses appreciation for Dr. King making the urgency of this matter clear to the world.

Letter from Wesley Hotchkiss to Associates of the Citizen Education Project

Wednesday, September 7, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Mr. Hotchkiss, the General Secretary of the AMA and primary UCBHM representative for the CEP, writes employees to clear up confusion regarding the administrative structure of the CEP. He informs employees that the the CEP is administered by the UCBHM stating, "When staff are confused about their employer it usually means they are confused about their objectives." The organization's most important objective, Mr. Hotchkiss asserts, is to mobilize individuals who have been trained under the CEP to focus the skills they have acquired on community development.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Christology

Dr. King references the concept of Christology by quoting German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968
Florida (FL), Orangeburg, SC

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Letter from MLK to Mrs. White

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that she should seek financial assistance from her local welfare office because the SCLC will not be able to provide that service.

Letter From Ambassador Avraham Harman to MLK

Friday, January 27, 1967
ISRAEL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Ambassador Harman congratulates Dr. King for his aspirations concerning an "American Negro Pilgrimage" to Israel. He praises Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize, and discusses the importance of his leadership in this proposed project for peace.

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965
Michigan (MI), Selma, AL

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."