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Letter from Peggy Hutter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A white college student writes to Mrs. King, expressing her condolences and shock after the death of Dr. King.

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965
Washington (WA), CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter from MLK to Earl Hall

Friday, July 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. Earl Hall, who sent a letter to the "National Observer" in defense of Dr. King.

Draft of MLK's Public Statement Concerning SCLC Supporting Communism

New York, NY, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the accusation in the New York Herald Tribune that some SCLC members support Communism. He also states that the SCLC has severed ties with former member Jack O'Dell, including the fundraising that had taken place in New York.

Peter Lombard


Dr. King outlines biographical information regarding theologian Peter Lombard.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Kentucky (KY), California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), New Hampshire (NH), South Carolina (SC), Rhode Island (RI), Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA), New York, NY, Florida (FL), Minnesota (MN), Georgia (GA)

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

Memorandum from William A. Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette to SCLC Staff Members

Thursday, January 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

William Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette inform the SCLC staff members of an impromptu retreat on the Poor People's Campaign, which will be held at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from D. McDonald to Prafulla Chandra Das

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this response letter regarding a request for a prefatory message from Dr. King, Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's personal secretary, cites his extensive obligations in conveying regrets. It became increasingly common for Dr. King to decline such requests as his work and mission progressed.

Publicity Plans for Pilgrimage Tour

New York (NY)

This document describes a request for Dr. King to become involved with the Pilgrimage Tour in New York.

Letter From Dora McDonald to Rev. Albert F. Campbell

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Secretary McDonald writes Rev. Campbell on Dr. King's behalf, informing him of that Dr. King will consider his invitation to the next Men's and Women's Day celebration.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to MLK

Thursday, December 19, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

Music composer Irwin Heilner corresponds with Dr. King inquiring about the possibility of composing music and setting it to King's "I Have A Dream" speech.

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963
Wisconsin (WI)

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967
Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

Letter from Representative Ken W. Dyal to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965
Washington, D.C.

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to inform him that he has signed the discharge petition for the Home Rule Bill.

Program for SCLC Annual Freedom Banquet

Monday, August 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA)

This program from SCLC's Tenth Annual Freedom Banquet features Senator Edward M. Kennedy as guest speaker.

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

Letter from J.W. Parnell to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rev. J.W. Parnell writes Dr. King to request support for his "one man demonstration march." The demonstration, Parnell outlines, features a bicycle ride from Coney Island, New York to Long Beach, California, conjoined with prayer and a symbolic water ritual.

MLK Address at the National Biennial Convention

Wednesday, May 14, 1958
Florida (FL), INDIA, INDONESIA, BURMA / MYANMAR, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King delivers this speech at the National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. The convention took place May 1, 1958 in Miami Beach, Florida. Dr. King discusses how the Jewish and Negro communities are unified by the escape of bondage. They share a common fight against the deadly enemies of oppression. He continues on to discuss the things that need to be done in order for African Americans to reach great potential along with the importance of fighting for and obtaining democracy.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on the transcendence of God and His intimate relation to the world.

Letter from Marry Gottesfeld to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963
New York, NY

Mary Gottesfeld, president of the Community and Social Agency Employees Union, writes Dr. King expressing pleasure in contributing more to Dr. King's organization. She also reminds him of the thousands that are behind his cause.

Herbert Coulton Appointed Director of Affiliates of SCLC

Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN)

Mr. Herbert Coulton is appointed the Director of Affiliates for the SCLC.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, April 16, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, GERMANY, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

Sunday, November 4, 1956
Montgomery, AL, FRANCE, New York, NY, ISRAEL

Dr. King shares "Paul's Letter to American Christians" with the congregation of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In this contemporary letter revised by Dr. King, Apostle Paul writes concerning the "responsibilities of Americans to live as Christians." He discusses his appreciation for America, the danger of capitalism, communism, segregation in churches, and the many denominations of Protestantism. But above all things, Apostle Paul believes that love is the most "durable power in the world."

Letter from MLK to a Young John Lewis

Tuesday, March 5, 1963
Nashville, TN, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes John Lewis, the future activist and U.S. Congressman, to thank him for a previous letter and to offer financial assistance. He discusses the possibility of Mr. Lewis joining his staff in Alabama.