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Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Letter from Hugh Gloster to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Hugh Gloster, President of Morehouse College, sends a copy of the brochure "The Negro & Higher Education In The South", to Dr. King. He also mentions the Morehouse Board of Trustees meeting, in New York, Nov. 9th.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Tullberg to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

The Tullberg family from New Hampshire conveys their support to Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. They believe that the war is a violation of the basic principles of human rights.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to join the World Conference on Vietnam in Stockholm. The conference will include delegates from multiple peace organizations around the world to help protest the war in Vietnam.

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

Letter from W. Ivan Hoy to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963

W. Ivan Hoy, on behalf of the University of Miami, invites Dr. King to be a guest lecturer for their Miami Religion Lecture Series.

Letter from MLK to Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller

Friday, September 14, 1962

In this letter, Dr. King writes to New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller to express his gratitude for the Governor's letter and copy of his new book. Dr. King also refers to the possibility of Gov. Rockefeller's making "a large contribution to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights," and writes extensively about the Society and the effect such a contribution would have.

Letter from Don Blaine to MLK

Thursday, August 26, 1965

Don Blaine seeks advice from Dr. King concerning the idea of organizing a peace caravan that would travel throughout the United States. Blaine views this suggestion as a way to garner international support for peace.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Remarks by the Right Rev. Richard S. Emrich

Friday, June 28, 1957

This address accompanies the awarding of the Springarn Medal to Dr. King. The Medal is presented annually by the NAACP for Outstanding Achievement by a Negro Citizen.

University of Mississippi at Oxford Crisis

Dr. King discusses the Mississippi crisis after the admittance of James Meredith into the local University.

Letter from Mrs. Edna E. Williams to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

Mrs. Edna E. Williams invites Dr. King to attend The Friendship Baptist Church's annual Harry W. Knight Award and Mortgage Retirement Fund Banquet.

Letter from Dr. King to the Media Seeking Support for Negroes Living in Chicago

support from white media outlets to help fight for freedom of the average black citizen in chicago
ernie banks, billy williams, don bufords and floyd robinson

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Power of Attorney

Wednesday, November 29, 1961

This document appoints Chauncey Eskridge as agent and attorney for Rev. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr. in Philadelphia.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

The Church

Dr. King writes a note on the Church, calling it the "center of hope."

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

How My Mind Has Changed In the Last Decade

Dr. King discusses how his thoughts about theological theory have changed over the years. It is the only page of the document in the collection.

Tillich's Definition of God

Dr. King documents philosopher Paul Tillich's definition of God from his book "Systematic Theology."

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Message from the President

Dr. King expounds on the importance of nonviolence and voter registration to the mission of the SCLC.

Retirement Speech from MLK to Dr. Benjamin E. May

Dr. King honors Dr. Mays for serving as the President of Morehouse College as he enters into retirement.

Telegram from Mr. Aubrey Williams to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960

Members of the Board of The Southern Conference Educational Fund write to Dr. King and express their admiration for the stand he has taken.

Draft of the Position Paper on Community Re-Creation

Saturday, April 1, 1967

This document drafts a set of intentions aimed at improving communities in America and uplifting individuals out of poverty. Proposed fundamental goals of achieving this include, a secure and adequate income, a proportionate share of decision making power, and access to the full range of human services.

Letter to MLK on Anti-Semitism

Friday, November 4, 1966

M.C. Gettinger, Executive Director at the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, writes to express dismay about alleged remarks about Jews made by Hosea Williams at Spelman College.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Letter from Lillian Smith to MLK

Thursday, July 7, 1966

Lillian Smith, author of 'Strange Fruit,' writes Dr. King to tell of her current health condition. During this time Ms. Smith was battling breast cancer, and was hopeful she would recover. Smith requests Dr. King to visit upon her return home to Clayton County.