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Letter of Inquiry from Carol Hess to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968

In this letter Carol Hess of New York requests an audience with Dr. King. She is writing a paper pertaining to the Birmingham March.

Statement by MLK re Citizen Diplomacy

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King releases a statement that he was considering communicating by mail with the "major powers" involved in the Vietnam conflict. However; he now believes that with the changing factors of certain groups involved in the conflict, his proposed communication is no longer needed.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

A. Phillip Randolph, on behalf of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and the Negro American Labor Council, expresses joy at Dr. King's release from prison.

Irene Dunaway Requests Sermon from SCLC

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Irene V. Dunaway of Daly City, California writes the members of SCLC requesting a copy of Dr. King's recent address on the ABC network. She admires the sermon as "one of the greats," and would also like to "brush up" on her knowledge of history pertaining to Vietnam.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card

Frank and Ann Smallwood enclose their annual membership fees for the SCLC. The Smallwoods express that they know Dr. King will experience financial difficulties because of his stand on the Vietnam War and they wish they could contribute more.

CEP News

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Martha Kennedy thanks Dr. King for sending her a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Kennedy feels that Dr. King's leadership is well emphasized in the context of the book. Particularly, she finds the chapter on Black Power to be "valuable." Mrs. Kennedy hopes for much success to Dr. King and his great work.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Letter from FBI Director John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the work of Special Agents of the Bureau in Alabama.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Friday, September 8, 1961

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Letter from Assistant Deputy Attorney General William A. Geoghegan to MLK

Wednesday, March 10, 1965

William Geoghegan, Assistant Deputy Attorney General, thanks Dr. King for his telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the Fifth Circuit of the United States Court of Appeals.

Letter from Benjamin Newman, Jr. to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mr. Newman offers suggestions to Dr. King and Mr. Al Raby regarding voting registration in Chicago.

Letter from Helen Ramirez to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Helen Ramirez of The Brunswick Foundation informs Dr. King that they cannot donate to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Wednesday, May 27, 1964

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 9, 1967

In this letter, Robert L. Green, Professor at Michigan State University, requests a signature of approval from Dr. King. This signature would grant permission for Social Scientists to have involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Letter from J.Campe to MLK regarding Book Royalties

Friday, May 19, 1967

This financial document references earnings from the Japanese editions of Dr. King's books, "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Robert E. Harding, Thomas H. Weddington and Celestine B. Bailey to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967

Robert E. Harding Jr., Thomas H. Weddington, and Celestine B. Bailey detail the many allegations of racial discrimination involving employees from the National Labor Relations Board. These issues have conflicted with the Equal Employment Opportunity and the Civil Service Rules and Regulations. Harding, Weddington, and Bailey request Dr. King's assistance to correct this issue.

Western Union Telegram from James McDaniel to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Mr. McDaniel invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the executive committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Letter from Washington University to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Faculty of the Political Science Department at Washington University release a resolution supporting Dr. King and his efforts to secure voting rights for Negroes in Selma, Alabama. They urge the Federal Government to take a serious look at this issue following recent attacks upon Negroes trying to exercise their right to vote.

Knudson

Dr. King cites a publication by theologian Albert Knudson.

Index card written by MLK regarding Faith

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's insights on the subject of faith. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for quick reference to quotations, ideas, and bible verses, among other things. Material covered on these index cards includes topics such as theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from MLK to Richard V. Grulich

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Mr. Grulich regarding U.S. foreign policy, asserting that the federal government needs to develop the "moral courage" to admit past mistakes.

Telegram from MLK to Terry Shaw

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Dr. King telegrams Terry Shaw stating that the staff of SCLC sends their "deepest sympathy" in his time of grief.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from R. A. Peterson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This letter of condolence, originating from a Bank of America executive in San Francisco, CA and addressed to Mrs. King. The writer expresses hope that Dr. King's work and legacy will carry forward in his tradition of nonviolence.