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Letter from MLK to Willard T. Carter

Friday, December 27, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Willard Carter for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. King states that because of friends like them he can help end racial discrimination and segregation in the South.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, February 19, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Ebenezer Baptist Church

Atlanta, GA

This picture depicts Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Dr. King pastored.

Letter from MLK to Mr. C.G. Christian

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King sends this letter of recommendation, on behalf of Reverend John Thomas Porter, to the Pulpit Committee of Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Following the death of Dr. Goodgame, Dr. King nominates without reservation, Reverend Porter who he calls, "one of the finest men on the ministerial horizon."

The Time for Freedom Has Come

Montgomery, AL, Cambridge, MA, California (CA)

Dr. King discusses the evolution of Negro students partcipating in the movement. This article was published by in the New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

The Future of Integration

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Letter from the Hadley Executive Committee to Dora McDonald

Saturday, April 8, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ernest Shaefer communicates with Dora McDonald to solidify the details surrounding Dr. King's lecture in Pennsylvania. Mr. Shaefer informs Miss McDonald of the written confirmation and formal contract that must be signed in advance.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Race Prejudice"

Here in this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on Race Prejudice and the "evil" it entails.

Letter from MLK to Curtis Cosby

Dr. King drafts a response letter to Mr. Cosby, stating he is aware of Senator Leroy Johnson's efforts to appoint Attorney Donald Hollowell as a federal judge. He is encouraged to learn of the Esquires Club's involvement and hopes the appointment is successful.

Letter to MLK from Mrs. Mary Jane Chattams

Friday, November 17, 1967
Ohio (OH), Berlin, Germany

Mrs. Chattams, a student, has contacted Dr. King for further clarity regarding a sermon he reportedly delivered in a Communist Church. Sharing Dr. King’s comments will be informative and beneficial for future class discussions.

MLK Examination Blue Book

Friday, May 23, 1947

Dr. King used this "Blue Book" to record answers for a Bible exam taken on May 23, 1947.

Theology and Science

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as a source on theology and science.

Worship (Definition)

Dr. King defines worship as contemplation on the whole of existence.

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967
VIETNAM, Maryland (MD), JORDAN, EGYPT

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
CANADA

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."

Letter to MLK from John Yungblut

Monday, January 9, 1967
CHINA, Atlanta, GA

John Yungblut writes to inform Dr. King about a conference to take place at Georgia State College. It will discuss China-United States relations and he would like for Dr. King to lend his sponsorship. Yungblut was the director of Quaker House, a civil rights and peace organization in Atlanta in the 1960's.

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY

This is a debit memo for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Franklin W. Thomas to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Franklin W. Thomas writes to Dr. King to apologize for the delay in honoring his participation in the Hungry Club Forum 20th Anniversary Series.

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.

Royalties Summary to MLK from J. Campe

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY)

Here J. Campe itemizes the income from Dr. King's various publications including "Why We Can't Wait," "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love", for a total of $2202.26.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967
New York (NY), ITALY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about her Italian associates, Santi Ando & Figli's, invitation to Italy. She also notes the publisher's request for a surplus of photographs.

Joan Daves Informs MLK of a Proposal to Print the Speech from the March on Washington

Friday, October 23, 1964
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Washington (WA)

Joan Daves negotiates with John Avirgan on the royalty percentage for the rights to sale hand-lettered versions of the Speech from the March on Washington.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New Hampshire (NH), GERMANY

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

God

Dr. King explores the topic of God and quotes the classical scholar Gilbert Murray.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967
VIETNAM, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., EGYPT, GERMANY, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, CUBA

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

Appreciation Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Maurice Dawkins expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's statement that encouraged the Congress to support the war on poverty. He also expresses appreciation for Dr. King making the urgency of this matter clear to the world.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 21, 1964
Berlin, Germany, GERMANY

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes about plans for a reception and press conference in Bonn, Germany. Ms. Daves mentions that Dr. King may be asked to deliver an address.

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.