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Letter from MLK to Charles A. Melton

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation to visit Westchester, Pennsylvania due to the time he must devote to the Chicago campaign and helping political candidates in Alabama.

The Trinity

Dr. King records the definition of "The Trinity" as described on page 43 of "Dogmatics" in Outline by Karl Barth.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Samuel B. McKinney

Dr. and Mrs. King express their condolences for the passing of Reverend Samuel B. McKinney's mother.

Letter from Hosea Williams to MLK

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

Hosea Williams submits his resignation as a staff member of the SCLC. He also requests a meeting with the Steering Committee and Dr. King to discuss unfinished items related to the SCLC.

Invitation to King's House, Jamaica

Governor-General Clifford Campbell invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a dinner at King's House, Jamaica. King's House is the official residence of the Governor General.

Strength to Love Royalty Statement

This is a detailed royalty statement from the German language edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Christliche Verlag.

The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and The Christian Ministry

In this essay fragment from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King writes that Christianity is a value philosophy whose values are embodied in the life of Christ. He begins to spell out what those values are. The first, King states, is the value of the world as something positive and life-affirming, in contrast to the negative view of the world of the ascetics and religions of India. The second value is that of persons, who have supreme worth. People must be used as ends, never as means to ends, although there have been periods in history where Christianity has fallen short.

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.


Dr. King quotes German philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.

SCLC Memo- The Ministers Leadership Training Program

Thursday, February 15, 1968

This memo reminds the Steering Committee and Executive Staff, of the SCLC, that "funds for the Ministers Leadership Training Program are not being used to finance currect SCLC direct-action programs."

Telegram from MLK to Chauncey Eskridge

Saturday, May 12, 1962

Serving as the Honorary President, Dr. King invites Chauncey Eskridge to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights luncheon held in Washington, D.C., where he will be able to provide legal services to many southern Negroes in need.

Letter from Richard V. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, June 12, 1962

Mr. Richard Moore invites Dr. King to speak at the Baccalaureate Commencement of Bethune-Cookman College in Florida.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, February 18, 1965

Dr. King writes Murray Thomson expressing his inability to accept an invitation to be a consultant for Thomson's organization's conference in Portland, Ontario. He explains that due to his commitment to the civil rights struggle he can only accept a limited amount of engagements.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

Saturday, August 12, 1967

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Fixler

Friday, December 8, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Bernard Fixler, from Dr. King, he thanks Mr. Fixler for the contribution made to the SCLC.

Draft Position Paper on Economic and Fiscal Policy

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The basis of this draft paper is about the proposed elimination of poverty in the United States within a ten-year span. A plan called the "Freedom Budget" has been endorsed by the A. Philip Randolph Institute. The premise of this paper is to "carry forward these developments in the economic and fiscal area, setting forth suggested policies which might be supported by all individuals and groups associated" with the goal of eradicating poverty in the United States.

Letter from Bryce Nelson to MLK

Tuesday, July 4, 1967

Bryce Nelson, a SCLC contributor, writes Dr. King expressing that he shares the same views regarding the Vietnam War and commends Dr. King for asserting his beliefs.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Taban

Dr. King expresses his concern for Mr. Taban's welfare in Kenya after fleeing Sudan.

Letter from Friends of the SNCC to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Richard Meier and Lowell Bergman request Dr. King's support for a letter-writing campaign directed at members of the Wisconsin State Senate and Assembly.

Request for Help

Monday, November 6, 1967

Marcellus M. Harper requests assistance from Dr. King in relation to economic improvement. In his letter of appeal, Mr. Harper requests that Dr. King speaks on gossip, unity, improving conditions and ways of living, and economic improvement.

Job, Ecclesiastes and Daniel

Dr. King quotes several scriptures from the biblical Books of Job, Ecclesiastes and Daniel concerning each author's views on mortality and immortality.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

"Dr. King Outdated"

Saturday, July 15, 1967

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.

Letter from Christian Action to MLK

Monday, April 20, 1964

L. John Collins, Chairman of Christian Action, writes Dr. King inquiring if he would be interested in attending a public meeting in London regarding race relations in South Africa. In addition to Dr. King, one of the prospective speakers mentioned was James Baldwin.

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

Letter from MLK to Glenn Greenwood

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Glenn Greenwood's letter thanking him for his suggestion regarding the Pentagon directive "in relation to Armed Forces personnel participation in civil rights demonstrations."

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from Ms. Gitta Gossmann to Ms. Dora McDonald

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Ms. Gossmann writes to Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's "Strength to Love." Enclosed in the letter are contract copies for the Italian-language edition of the publication.