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New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

Thursday, December 17, 1964

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.

Letter from Aubrey Brown Jr. to MLK

Monday, June 26, 1967

Aubrey Brown Jr., Editor of "The Presbyterian Outlook," asks Dr. King to provide a statement regarding the obligations American voters have to choose "officials who have high personal moral standards." The statement will be used in the publication's annual "Going to College" Handbook.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy from Abraham Grinoch

Monday, April 22, 1968

Rev. Ralph Abernathy received this letter addressing the issuance of war bonds to meet financial requirements during war emergencies. Grinoch proposes that the country issue "War on Poverty Bonds", to provide the funds necessary for eradicating poverty in the United States.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. W.E. Anderson

Friday, June 9, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to the wife of Dr. Anderson and assures her that they will continue the noble endeavors that Dr. Anderson began.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Sin

In this set of notecards, Dr. King discusses "sin." Referencing Biblical verses of Psalms 53:2 and 53:3, he says that "these passages seem to be an explicit affirmation of the universality of sin."

Telegram from MLK to Reverend F. D. Reece

Saturday, January 11, 1964

Dr. King congratulates Selma, Alabama Reverend F. D. Reese for demonstrating on behalf of teachers fighting injustice.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Contradiction and the Power of God

Dr. King reflects on man's understanding of God and salvation.

Letter from Rabbi Dudley Weinberg to MLK

Monday, September 14, 1964

Rabbi Dudley Weinberg writes Dr. King requesting him to give a sermon in Wisconsin because he believes that his presence there would provide "enormous impetus for the work which many of [us] are attempting to get done on behalf of our Negro fellow citizens."

Letter from Sigmund Diamond of Political Science Quarterly to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Sigmund Diamond asks Dr. King if Political Science Quarterly can re-print his review of Ronald Segal's "The Race War: The World-Wide Clash of White and Non-White."

Reason and Faith

Dr. King writes a quote from William Spurrier's Guide to the Christian Faith.

Telegram from Norwegian Student Association to MLK

The Norwegian Student Association inquires if Dr. King will be available to give a lecture on Human Freedoms.

Letter of Commitment to Reverend Jesse Jackson from John Wooten

Friday, February 10, 1967

John Wooton expresses the commitment of the Negro Industrial Economic Union towards the efforts of Reverend Jesse Jackson and SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, September 20, 1963

W. David Angus, Secretary of the Canadian Club of Montreal, extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at an upcoming luncheon. He concludes by offering to cover any expenses that Dr. King may accumulate if he were to accept the invitation.

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy's Statement Following MLK's Assasination

Sunday, April 7, 1968

Rev. Abernathy acknowledges the deep pain and anger those in SCLC feel at the senseless taking of Dr. King’s life. They pledge that his work and commitment to nonviolence will continue. They are as much against violence, says Abernathy, as they are against racial and economic injustice. He announces that Mrs. King will join him in leading a march in Memphis in support of the sanitation workers and that the Poor People’s Campaign will proceed. He calls upon Congress to respond to the major loss represented by Dr.

Letter from Clifford L. Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Clifford L. Alexander, Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, wrote to Dr. King to encloses some clippings from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission News Digest, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post regarding the EEOC's hearings on white collar discrimination in New York.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, September 10, 1965

Joan Daves notifies Dora McDonald that she is sending "two Japanese language copies of two titles". The titles were originally addressed to Dr. King via Joan's office.

A Note with no Addressee from the Desk of Joan Daves

A note on Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, letterhead to an unaddressed recipient about Japanese annotations of "Strength to Love."

Syllabus for the History of Christianity

This document is a course syllabus for the History of Christianity.

Waste in Foreign Aid

Sunday, February 19, 1967

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

Letter from James E. Davis to MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1966

Rev. James A. Davis requests the assistance of Dr. King in his graduate studies focusing on pastoral care and race relations. Davis was recently appointed as the assistant pastor of the Carroll Street Methodist Church in Nashville and expresses distaste with the fact that there are no Negroes members in the congregation. Davis wishes for the Carroll Street Methodist Church to become more inclusive.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 11, 1967

Gitta Badeker informs Dora McDonald of an offer from Santi Ando & Figli for the Italian rights to "Where Do We Go from Here," and includes administrative instructions on how to proceed.

Governor Rockefeller Confirms Invitation to Speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

This letter dated September 2, 1965, was sent to Dr. King from Margaret Fowler, calendar Secretary to Gov. Rockefeller. In this letter Ms. Fowler confirms to Dr. King that the governor will be able to speak at the Men's Day Observance at Ebenezer Baptist Church on October 17, 1965.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Otherworldliness

Dr. King quotes the Epistle of Clement and Friedrich von Hügel's "Eternal Life."

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

Telegram from C. Dolores Tucker to MLK and Others

Friday, November 3, 1967

C. Dolores Tucker offers some words of encouragement to Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker during their incarceration in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from Alice B. Bye to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Alice B. Bye requests that Dr. King send information and a picture for her school report.