Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Alabama (AL)"

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Letter from Frederick E. Wallin to MLK

Sunday, March 1, 1964

Frederick E. Wallin, of Alderson-Broaddus College, invites Dr. King to debate Fulton Lewis III. The debate will be sponsored by the Young Americans for Freedom. Television and radio coverage will also be available.

Letter from Chuck Barris to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Chuck Barris has received national monetary support for the truck rentals used for the Selma to Montgomery March.

Letter from Mary Ann Johnson to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mary Ann Johnson of Boston thanks Dr. King for taking a stand against the bombing in Vietnam. Johnson stresses that funds supplied for the war cripples the wages of working people in America.

Letters from Ambassadors

Dr. King notes the letters that he has received from several Ambassadors. He also notes the confirmed appointments with the Ambassadors.

MLK Notes - Voting Issues and Strategies

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's, found on the back of a memorandum, focus largely on voter registration issues and strategies. Of interest is an item adjacent to the body of the notes remarking, "Daddy King has yet to understand non-violence."

Letter from Macedonia Church to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Members of Macedonia Church seek advice and help from Dr. King in regards to continuing Sunday worship service.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edith Segal

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dora McDonald communicates to Edith Segal that she has be referred to the letter addressed originally to Bernard Lee. Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Segal that Dr. King is unable to comment on her book due to his consistent traveling endeavors in the South for the Civil Rights Movement.

Irene Dunaway Requests Sermon from SCLC

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Irene V. Dunaway of Daly City, California writes the members of SCLC requesting a copy of Dr. King's recent address on the ABC network. She admires the sermon as "one of the greats," and would also like to "brush up" on her knowledge of history pertaining to Vietnam.

A Union Treasurer Writes MLK Regarding the SCLC Convention

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Cleveland Robinson, Secretary Treasurer of AFL-CIO District 65 Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, writes to Dr. King with several suggestions for the upcoming SCLC convention.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

Letter to MLK from Rev. L.C. Coleman

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Rev. Coleman, of Marks, Mississippi addresses Dr. King, as the recipient of this correspondence. This letter asks for Dr. King to visit the town of Marks and participate in a Citizenship Class. It, also, notes that Rev. Coleman is running for a town elected position, known as "Road Supervisor."

Sermon Text (Habakkuk)

Dr. King examines Habakkuk chapter 1, verses 2 through 4 to discuss whether the inequalities of life are justification to question God.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Statement by Albert Raby Responding to Attack on MLK by Ernest Rather

Albert Raby responds to questions by Ernest Rather about Dr. King's statistics related to Negro housing conditions. He explains that Dr. King's facts were taken from the 1960 census, which he contrasts with statistics from the Department of Urban Renewal.

Did President Kennedy Die in Vain

"Did President Kennedy Die In Vain" describes the author's request that we elect officials with a higher moral bearing and adherence to Christian principles.

Women Strike for Peace: How Can You Be Silent?

Thursday, April 1, 1965

This newsletter exemplifies the struggle that Vietnamese children faced during the war. It also urges many to protest in order to prevent young children from dying.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, shares a quotation from W.E.B. DuBois' "The Souls of Black Folk." The excerpt is consistent with Dr. King's view on the importance of "keeping white allies in the civil rights movement."

History: Voltaire

Dr. King references a quote from the philosopher and historian Voltaire.

Dewey

Dr. King records John Dewey's views on philosophy and religion.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. G. Baker

Friday, July 30, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Baker, President of the Bethune Art and Study Club, for her monetary contribution to the SCLC. King explains that each contribution is necessary for the SCLC to fulfill all its tasks.

Letter from MLK to Abby Seldes

Friday, January 31, 1964

Dr. King dictates a response letter to Miss Abby Seldes expressing his heartwarming appreciation to the young lady. He also expresses gratitude towards Abby's parents for attending the March On Washington demonstration.

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

Justice Harlan Concurring

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, March 4, 1968

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

Sermon Introductions by MLK

Dr. King frames a series of introductions to sermons that includes such selections as Civilization's Great Need, Life Is What You Make It, and Why Religion?

Letter from Sy Sadinoff to MLK

Thursday, May 14, 1964

After speaking to Jackie Robinson and asking him how Beacon Looms, Inc. can best help the movement for Negro equality, Sy Sadinoff writes to Dr. King enclosing a $100 donation for the Mount Olive Building Fund.

Letter from the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968

The executive board of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket informs Dr. King of the works and efforts of their organization. The SCLC's Operation Breadbasket originated the very principles and methods in which the Milwaukee chapter operates. The chapter has initiated many employment opportunities and increased the economic status of the Negro community. Dr. King is requested to provide them with the official documentation to charter their chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Furthermore, they would greatly appreciate the opportunity to see Dr. King in an appearance in Milwaukee.