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MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

SCLC Executive Staff Meeting

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King provides Civil Rights Activist, Septima Clark, with information regarding the Executive Staff meeting for the SCLC. Dr. King requests that Ms. Clark have her report ready to present prior to the meeting.

Letter from MLK to Ann Patricia Herring

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King congratulates Ann Herring on her new marriage and apologizes for misfiling her earlier letters asking him to perform her marriage ceremony. He assures her that if he had seen her letters, he would have made his best attempt to perform the ceremony.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

A. Philip Randolph congratulates Dr. King on the statement he made on "Face the Nation."

Letter from MLK to Herschel McGee about a Corporation

Monday, October 4, 1965
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH

In this letter Dr. King thanks Mr. McGee for his $50.00 check for the starting of a corporation for Negroes, but he lets McGee know that he is unable to concentrate on the devlopment and is returning his check.

Charles Renouvier

Dr. King outlines the philosophical career of Charles Renouvier.

White Backlash Growing

Friday, August 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Denver, CO, ITALY, AUSTRIA, Boston, MA, GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, POLAND, GREECE, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

Letter from MLK to C.W. Greene

Thursday, August 10, 1967
Georgia (GA)

In this letter to C.W. Greene of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, Dr. King requests supplies for an upcoming convention.

Letter from Bob Abel to MLK


In this letter Bob Abel encloses a contribution from a friend in England to Dr. King while also commenting on Vietnam and the link to Civil Rights.

Letter from Sharon J. Brown to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Sharon Brown, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King how his congregation worships. She explains that this question is for a class project.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Saturday, April 29, 1967
Berkeley, CA, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., Geneva, Switzerland

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Robert Brandeis to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Robert Brandies expresses his support regarding the efforts of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Opportunity, Fidelity, and Reward

Friday, January 1, 1954
Alabama (AL)

This handwritten outline reflects a sermon delivered by Dr. King at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in January of 1954. The sermon is structured around "The Parable of the Talents" taken from Matthew 25:14-30. Dr. King highlights how the passage assures a "reward for faithfulness."

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ericson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ericson are expressing their immense support for Dr. King and his humanitarianism. They stress the importance to look beyond the racial lines and focus on a more cohesive world community.


Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion" on the topic of evil.

The Role of the Church in the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma

This handwritten draft represents the first part of Dr. King's address entitled, "The Role of the Church in Facing the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma," delivered at the Conference on Christian Faith and Human Relations in 1957. Dr. King begins his address by discussing the scientific and technological advances that have taken place in America and how this progress has influenced economic growth. He asserts that this is the nation is dealing with a "chief moral dilemma."

Civil Rights Drive by SCLC and Other Groups Wins Open Housing Victory in Louisville

Saturday, December 30, 1967
Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY)

This 1967 SCLC news release details the passage of a law forbidding racial discrimination in housing in Louisville, Kentucky. It also details the role that SCLC and its sister organizations had in bring about this legislation.

Anti-Slavery and Reform Papers


Harvest House Limited, a publishing company, announce the release of Henry David Thoreau's essay collection regarding anti-slavery and reform.

Irresistible Grace

Dr. King notes the meaning of irresistible grace.

Joint Memorandum of Intern Regarding the Death of James Reeb

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Unitarian Universalist Association, and the American Friends Service Committee have each established a James Reeb Memorial Fund. The purpose of these funds are to provide financial assistance to those who are personally involved in the struggle for equal rights. James Reeb was a white civil rights activist who was brutally murdered by white segregationists in Selma, 1965.

Official Program of the Spring Mobilization

The following document is an official program listing the schedule of the Spring Mobilization on April 15, 1967.

Discrimination Is a World Wide Issue

INDIA, New York, NY

Dr. King delivers this address speaking to humanity's failure to offset discrimination. He believes the United States, with all its technological and democratic advances, could stand to learn from the social morality of India, which is considered a "less developed nation." Dr.

Letter from Senator William Proxmire to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

US Senator William Proxmire writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for the Reverend's previous letter regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "Dogmatics in Outline" on Jesus and his relationship to God.

Telegram from Andrew Young to the Swedish Ecumenical Council

SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden

Andrew Young, Executive Assistant to Dr. King, writes the Swedish Ecumenical Council's Nils Sundholm, informing him that Dr. King can accept his invitation to host a worship service in Sweden in December as part of his trip to Europe.

Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.


Dr. King references the concept of evil.

Letter from Sam Garwood Concerning MLK's Involvement with the Vietnam Conflict

Brooklyn, NY

Sam Garwood expresses his opinion on the Vietnam War. It could have a negative effect on the Civil Rights Movement if Dr. King doesn't address the situation in a pleasing way to Americans. He believes that a lot of support gained could be lost due to the War.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.