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"Alabama (AL)"

Letter from J. L. Richard to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Reverend J. L. Richard, from Evergreen Baptist Church, sends prayers for Dr. King and the Negro race. Richard also sends a monetary contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from William Seabron to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Department of Agriculture Assistant to the Secretary, William M. Seabron writes Dr. King to enquire about fire insurance for "Negro citizens." He explains that a lack of fire insurance prevents citizens from improving existing homes or building new ones, following disaster. In addition, he requests any additional information Dr. King may find useful to the Department of Agriculture.

Letter from George D. Kelsey to MLK

Saturday, October 31, 1964

Dr. and Mrs. Kelsey applaud Dr. King on his nomination and receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Kelsey was Professor of Christian Ethics at Drew University.

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, October 20, 1963

Milton A. Reid, candidate for the Eighth Senatorial District, invites Mahalia Jackson to come and sing at the oldest Negro Baptist Church in America.

The Negotiating Committee and Housing

Thursday, May 12, 1966

This statement by the Negotiation Committee lists several improvements made to an African American housing community. The Committee explains that the changes are only on a trial basis and therefore, the community will still picket until permanent changes are made.

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

Letter from Ora Belle Tamm to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Ora Belle Tamm objects to the reaction of Negro leaders during the Adam Clayton Powell affair and expresses her disappointment to Dr. King.

Letter from Hazel Jardine to MLK and CSK

Friday, February 24, 1961

Mrs. Hazel Jardine commends Dr. King on his efforts to obtain equality for all men.

Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

Saturday, January 7, 1967

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from Fred Warren to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Fred Warren, Professor of Music at the University of California at Berkeley writes to Dr. King saddened that he will not be able to come to the University. Professor Warren encloses a brochure describing the department's program on Africa, music, and its related arts.

Letter from MLK to Louis O. Kelso

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Attorney Louis O. Kelso for sending him an autographed copy of, "How to Turn Eighty Million Workers into Capitalists on Borrowed Money."

Civil Rights and Vietnam

An avid supporter urges Dr. King to divert his attention to the War in Vietnam. He asserts "This war will force Chinese and Russian to interfere and may further expand into thermonuclear war..."

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Letter from Linda Robinson to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Linda Robinson, a sixth grade student at Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing her admiration towards him for his work with the Civil Rights Movement.

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

Public Affairs Memorandum

Monday, December 27, 1965

Vice President Humphrey is quoted as saying, "This is a pragmatic program - what's best is what works", in describing the Office of Economic Opportunity program. This public affairs memorandum details the efforts of the organization as it pertains to the anti-poverty movement.

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

Friday, April 8, 1966

Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

Telegram from Charles William Butler to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965

Charles William Butler, Pastor of New Cavalry Baptist Church, informs Dr. King that he will not be present at a board meeting. The lateness of the invitation and his involvement in Detroit, Michigan prevent his attendance.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

Letter from MLK to Melvin Grussing Regarding a Contribution

Monday, February 26, 1968

Dr. King writes to express gratitude for the generous contribution of $126 to the SCLC. He conveys that such support enables SCLC to continue programs to complete the task of voter registration in the South.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King examines the contradictions in human nature in this handwritten draft of a sermon.

Letter from Jerry Russell to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Jerry Russell offers his sympathy to Coretta Scott King following the death of Dr. King. He describes Dr. King as an individual of greatest integrity.

Education

Dr. King outlines his views on education.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

Letter from John Mack to MLK Requesting Advice

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

In this letter, John Mack asks Dr. King for advice on selecting the proper employment position that would satisfy his desire to contribute to "the perpetuation of social change and Negro progress," while still providing economic security for him and his family.

Letter from Daniel A. Jezer to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

Rabbi Daniel Jezer, of Temple Beth Shalom in Satellite Beach, Florida, responds to Dr. King's request for contributions to the SCLC. Rabbi Jezer, a past contributor to the SCLC, now feels in a quandary because of ?an anti-Israel, anti-Zionist platform? approved at the Conference of New Politics, which included delegates from the SCLC.

Letter from Mr. Herbert. H. Fisher to MLK

Saturday, July 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher, President of the Chatham Avalon Park Community Council, provides an organized detailed account of community concerns. More specifically, he addresses various social and political issues regarding schools, housing, insufficient leadership, and government services.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Anticommunist Flyer

This flyer suggests that the U.N. consists of communists Jews. Several contacts are provided for Americans to receive support and be educated about Communism.