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"Albany, GA"

National Emergency Action Committee Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

This document states that the Provisional Executive Committee of the National Emergency Action Committee will meet in Chicago on Wednesday, February 22, 1967. The document then givies the meeting agenda.

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

Press Release: MLK Joins Sponsors of April 15 Marches on San Francisco and New York City

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this press release, Dr. King announces his support of a massive mobilization against the Vietnam War. Sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, major peace marches are being held in New York City and San Francisco. Mrs. King is also listed as a leader who endorsed the demonstrations.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis J. Jackson

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King notifies Rev. Jackson that he will not be able to travel to Orlando, but offers that he'll hopefully be able to accept more invitations in the near future. In addition, he requested that Rev. Jackson come and visit the Annual Convention of S.C.L.C. in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dolly Davis

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dolly Davis that Dr. King is absent from the city and they're looking forward to receiving the galleys to "the New World of Negro Americans" by Harold Isaacs.

Old Age

Dr. King discusses the topic of old age. He references French poet Victor Hugo quoting, "winter was on his head but eternal spring was in his heart."

Letter from "The Nation" to MLK

"The Nation" sends Dr. King payment for his article, "Let Justice Roll Down." The article was published in the March 15, 1965 edition of the publication.

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.

Letter from Gregory Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Eleven-year-old Gregory Williams expresses his admiration and support for Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Immortality

Dr. King finds the best description of the unknowable nature of immortality in the New Testament of the Bible. It is a fragment of 1 Corinthians 2:9 regarding heaven.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Request from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Virgil Jones requests photocopies of letters sent to him on Nov. 9, 1967, as well as some other materials.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK's Book Draft

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Genevieve Young, from Harper & Row Publishers, expresses concern regarding an outline for Dr. King's upcoming book. She suggests an alternative way to frame the outline, and advises Joan Daves to use her discretion as to whether or not the memorandum should be passed on to Dr. King.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

Friday, December 23, 1966

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman on the principle of moral law.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Petition for Charter, the Filing of the Clerk and Certificate of the Secretary of State for Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Thursday, March 24, 1966

The following is a copy of the cover for the petition for charter,the filing of the Clerk and certificate of the Secretary of State for "Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

SCLC Form Letters

The first letter states that Dr. King is out of the city for a few days. The second letter expresses gratitude for the recipient's moral support and Christian generosity.

Letter from Charles and Leslie Gray to MLK about Contribution

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

In this letter, the Grays send an enclosed contribution to Dr. King in support of his "approach in the civil rights movement."

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Letter from Edwina Smith to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Ms. Edwina Smith writes Reverend Shuttlesworth regarding a SCLC meeting and encloses a round trip plane ticket.

Letter from Major E. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Rev. Major Smith briefly informs Dr. King of the support he has given Dr. King's program and asks him to reconsider the Alabama Boycott. He explains that he does not agree with this decision and states that this may cost him some supporters.

Letter from John W. McCormack to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

John McCormack writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his telegram of commendation "in relation to the passage of the Civil Rights Bill in the House of Representatives." McCormack expresses that he hopes he will have the pleasure of seeing Dr. King again.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.