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Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, May 28, 1964

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines John Dewey's views on Metaphysics. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches, sermons, and writings.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Kjelle Eide

Monday, January 29, 1968

In this letter Dr. King is expressing regret to Kjell Eide for the continued difficulty in organizing the peace mission. He currently aims to focus on the organizational plans for domestic issues, but would still consider a proposed alternative.

Letter to MLK from Mrs. Mary Jane Chattams

Friday, November 17, 1967

Mrs. Chattams, a student, has contacted Dr. King for further clarity regarding a sermon he reportedly delivered in a Communist Church. Sharing Dr. King’s comments will be informative and beneficial for future class discussions.

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.

Letter from Phyllis Kaplan to Readers

Academic Media sends out a questionnaire to gather important data regarding financial aid programs.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding British Edition of Book

Thursday, May 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves relays details regarding the British edition of "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?" to Dr. King.

Letter from Carl A. Auerbach to MLK

Monday, December 6, 1965

Carl A. Auerbach has declined to make contributions to the S.C.L.C based on the assumption that Dr. King will use the funds for protest movements "against the American policy in Vietnam."

Cyprian of Carthage

Dr. King briefly outlines the life of Saint Cyprian of Carthage.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King describes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's efforts as "courageous" and "effective" in guiding Congress to establish the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Cindy Eder to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Cindy Eder sends Dr. King warm wishes for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Yves Choliere

Friday, July 2, 1965

Dr. King informs Yves Choliere that he is unable to participate in the World Peace Congress in Helsinki, Finland in July of 1965. King explains that he and Reverend Abernathy are very busy with voter registration throughout the American South.

Response letter from Dr. King regarding Mr. Altomerianos and Charles Evans Hughes High School

Thursday, October 23, 1958

Dr. King took the time to write to the faculty and students of Charles Evans Hughes High School, following his release from Harlem Hospital. In this thank you, he expressed sincere gratitude for the well wishes from the young students relayed to him during his illness. Furthermore, Dr. King acknowledged that the future would be in good hands with their involvement in the struggle for Brotherhood and Human Dignity.

Telegram from SANE Co-Chair Benjamin Spock to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965

Dr. Benjamin Spock, acting as co-chairman of the National Committe for a Sane Nuclear Policy, transmits a telegram to Dr. King inviting him to deliver a speech at Madison Square Garden in reference to Vietnam.

Letter from Birt Waite to MLK

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Mr. Waite writes to Dr. King explaining the difficulties that have arisen with trying to give the SCLC his 1958 Rambler.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Charles R. Bell Jr. about Beating of a Prisoner

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

In this correspondence, Dr. King offers thanks to Rev. Bell for his letter about the "horrible beating" of a Negro prisoner in Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Art

Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Letter from MLK to the United Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. Edward Williams for the support of the United Presbyterian Church Commission on Religion and Race. He encloses a receipt for $5000 for partial payment of a grant for the salary of Hosea Williams. Williams was National Program Director for SCLC from 1967 to 1969 and was arrested more than 125 times for his civil rights activism.

Letter from a "White Power Militant"

A disgruntled writer criticizes leadership in the civil rights movement.

The Mastery of Fear

This outline explains the direction of Dr. King's sermon entitled "The Mastery of Fear." In it, Dr. King explores the challenges and necessity of confronting fear.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to Hubert Jones

Monday, August 26, 1963

Mr. Walker, SCLC Executive Assistant, responds on behalf of Dr. King to Hubert Jones regarding a "nation-wide project." Walker feels that the project would be premature at the moment and explains that his efforts locally would be valuable.

Transubstantiation

Dr. King defines 'transubstantiation', a concept derived from Roman Catholic theology.

SCLC Fall Conference Agenda

Friday, September 30, 1960

This is a tentative program for the SCLC's General Fall Conference to be held October 11th through the 13th in 1960. The program included such keynote speakers as Kelley Miller Smith, Joseph E. Lowery, and a freedom rally led by Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and Fred Shuttlesworth.