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"Albany, GA"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Bennett

Friday, May 13, 1966
Nevada (NV), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald writes Jean Bennett on behalf of Dr. King expressing his regards for offering to donate a substantial portion of the royalties from the recording of "We Ain't What We Was" to an organization of his choice.

Philadelphia Inquirer: Balance of Payments 'Cure' Was Devised in Near-Panic

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Wisconsin (WI), JAPAN, Washington, D.C.

This article by Rowland Evans and Robert Novak criticizes a proposed 2% border tax on imported goods. They argue that President Johnson's support of such a measure is reckless and will cause economic repercussions around the world.

Letter from Don Blaine to MLK

Thursday, August 26, 1965
Kansas (KS), Atlanta, GA

Don Blaine seeks advice from Dr. King concerning the idea of organizing a peace caravan that would travel throughout the United States. Blaine views this suggestion as a way to garner international support for peace.

Letter From MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

Dr. King regrets to inform some of the SCLC staff that they will have to cut back to their "normal capacity", while thanking them for their contribution to the organization.

Letter from Henry Moon to Rev. Abernathy concerning "In Memoriam" Reproductions

Thursday, April 18, 1968
New York, NY

This letter from Henry Lee Moon to Rev. Abernathy, accompanies enclosures of reproductions of documents associated with the "In Memoriam" sections of various newspapers in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

The Transcendental Dialectics

Dr. King writes on the "soul" and the "world" as two ideas of reason. He speaks to the human tendency to apply the categories of quantity, quality, relation, and modality to our understanding of the self. King ends these notes by contemplating "two absolutely contradictory propositions [that] seem to be established by the refutation of the other."

Luther

Dr. King references the political philosophy Martin Luther and quotes, "I will side always with him, however unjust, who endures rebellion and against him who rebels, however unjust."

Inter-Faith Mass Meeting

Sunday, June 11, 1967
Cincinnati, OH, Atlanta, GA

This program is for an Inter-Faith Mass Meeting that was co-sponsored by Mt. Zion Baptist Church and Zion Baptist Church. The meeting took place on June 11, 1967 and features Dr. King as the speaker.

Farewell Statement by MLK

Monday, March 9, 1959
INDIA

Dr. King writes a farewell statement to the people of India thanking them for their hospitality towards him, Mrs. King and Dr. Reddick. Dr. King pleas for world peace and asserts that India should take the lead in the call for universal disarmament.

Letter from Adie Marks to Harry Belafonte

Thursday, February 2, 1967
New York, NY, Selma, AL, Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

Adie Marks writes Harry Belafonte in an effort to organize an event consisting of several artists and organizations to combat issues African Americans face in America.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul J. Dolan

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald grants Paul J. Dolan approval to use the "I Have A Dream" speech that Dr. King delivered at the March on Washington.

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Monday, August 13, 1962
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

Letter from MLK to Katharine Hightower

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at a community event hosted by the Saint James African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from The Canadian Council of Christians and Jews to MLK

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
CANADA

National Executive Director Richard Jones invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto during the celebration of Canada's centennial birthday. Jones describes current racial relations and acknowledges that the centennial events could be used to spur "advances toward complete equality."

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

Friday, August 31, 1962
Ohio (OH), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Letter from Edward Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963
New York (NY), London, England

Edward Crawford of New York encloses a quotation for Dr. King to keep in his possession. The quotation centers around individuals who continue to be slient about serious issues that matter.

Max Stanford's Account

Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY)

This document written by an anonymous writer illustrates how officers attacked Max Stanford, a convicted felon, in a jail when he refused to obey a guard.

Love

Dr. King writes on the Apostle Paul’s concept of love.

Letter from Frank Meranda to President Johnson

Monday, October 17, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Frank Meranda, chairman of the Boston chapter of CORE, writes President Johnson to point out that job tests for the federal government result in discrimination against minorities.

Letter from Ben J. Mack to Reverend Andrew Young

South Carolina (SC)

Ben Mack forwards to Reverend Young an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the annual banquet of the South Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Thursday, October 12, 1967
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, VIETNAM

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

God Pronounces Judgement of America

Sunday, December 25, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, CANADA

God Pronounces Judgment of America is allegedly a prophecy from God, through his servant Reverend R. G. Hardy, given on Christmas Day 1966. It reveals that a horrible earthquake and war are in the future.

Letter from MLK To W. H. Jackson

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King responds to a letter from W. H. Jackson, regarding the Chicago Sunday Evening club. Mr. Jackson receives information on the possible effects his previous letter may have on Dr. King's white friends.

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Detroit, MI

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

Miracle

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible."

Letter from Daniel A. Jezer to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968
Florida (FL), ISRAEL

Rabbi Daniel Jezer, of Temple Beth Shalom in Satellite Beach, Florida, responds to Dr. King's request for contributions to the SCLC. Rabbi Jezer, a past contributor to the SCLC, now feels in a quandary because of ?an anti-Israel, anti-Zionist platform? approved at the Conference of New Politics, which included delegates from the SCLC.

Movement for Puerto Rican Independence

VIETNAM, PHILIPPINES, CUBA, PUERTO RICO, NICARAGUA, CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH KOREA

Pedro Juan Rua, a leader in the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, gives a speech concerning the American military presence in Vietnam. He provides a historical framework for understanding America's involvement with other oppressed nations, asserting "U.S. rulers are new Nazis. Unite to defeat them."

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Virginia (VA), Birmingham, AL

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.