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Letter from Arthur C. Holden to MLK Requesting Publication Review

Monday, December 11, 1967

Arthur C. Holden sends his paper entitled "The Negro, The Small Group, And Our Slum Problem" to Dr. King for review.

Letter from the Saskatchewan Teachers Federation to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964

The Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, a Canadian organization, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Federation extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker, which will involve meetings in four to five cities. The year of 1965 is the "golden jubilee year" and their desire to have an extraordinary individual as their guest speaker.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964

Thomas Elliott Huntley, member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

What the Reformation Took Out

This note card lists the effects of the Reformation on Christian worship. Summarizing the consequences, Dr. King notes, "the intellectual element was overemphasized."

Telegram from Bea Stanley to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Bea Stanley writes to Dr. King during his confinement at the Jefferson County Courthouse Jail. Stanley informs him that many of his supporters and friends are concerned regarding his health and safety, and also updates him on the progress of one of his publications.

Letter from Amelia Jones to MLK and the SCLC

Friday, February 18, 1966

The Toldeo NAACP Branch invites Dr. King to be their keynote speaker. Amelia Jacobs Jones, representing the NAACP, requests that suggested dates regarding Dr. King's availability be forwarded to her.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967

Kenneth Lee extends his gratitude for Dr. King's sponsorship status for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. Mr. Lee asks Dora McDonald if a meeting can be arranged between himself and Dr. King during his visit to Atlanta, Georgia in August 1967.

A Country Called Corporate America

Sunday, July 3, 1966

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

Letter from Stephen Harris to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Numerous riots have occurred at Marble Mountain Air Base in Vietnam due to mounting racial tensions. Stephen Harris, of the United States Marine Corps, writes to Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael addressing his frustration and the concerns of many Negro servicemen stationed there.

Letter from Donald F. Hinds to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Donald Hinds writes Dr. King to discuss issues such as the Vietnam War and economic injustice towards Negroes.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

Science

Dr. King's notecard addresses the analytical method of science. King interprets Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" to mean "[t]he method of science is to diversify or break up this experience into its component elements." He quotes Whitehead coining the term 'diversification of nature.'

Project Concern Pamphlet

This Pamphlet, made by Project Concern, discusses the efforts taken to help the impoverished and sick.

Letter from Richard W. Boone to MLK

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

A letter from Richard Boone, Executive Director of Citizens Crusade Against Poverty, to Dr. King, enclosing the preliminary draft of the C.C.A.P.'s training proposal to the Ford Foundation.

Negro Morality and Why Didnt She Stay Home?

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, recommends two articles published in The Carolina Israelite. "Negro Morality" makes distinctions between crime committed by impoverished Negroes and their ethically challenged white counterparts. The second article,"Why Didn't She Stay Home?" discusses tactics of the "Far Right," the ignoring of crimes committed against Negroes, and the role of both white and black clergy in the preservation of Christian ideals.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Tuesday, May 21, 1963

Influential clergyman, activist and fellow Morehouse alum Rev. Thomas Elliott Huntley thanks Dr. King for the warm hospitality he received upon his visit to Atlanta. He further discusses Dr. King's next visit to St. Louis and offers his home if other accommodations were not made.

Schleiermacher (What Is the Operation of Grace)

Dr. King records a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher's work "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Memorandum on direct Action in Alabama Cities

Dr. King writes a Direct Action plan for the Alabama cities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery. He believes that these cities need to focus on the emergence of violence and recommends the integration of Negroes into the police force.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 10, 1957

In this sermon, Dr. King states that "love is the key to the solution of the problems which we confront in the world today." Dr. King notes that this is not a simple task, but it is necessary.

Letter from Joseph Looney to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Joseph Looney writes Dr. King inviting him to visit American College in Louvain, Belgium. Looney suggests the Reverend lead a discussion regarding the developments in the Civil Rights struggle and his role in it. Looney closes by praying that God will bless Dr. King and his family.

Invoice-"Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 16, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King, for the shipment of six copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Adverse Letter from R. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

R. Johnson writes to Dr. King wishing physical violence against him. The author refers to Dr. King as "Big Mouth."

Existentialism

Dr. King explains the philosophy of existentialism.

Letter from Fred Gardner to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Mr. Gardner believes that Dr. King is responsible for the acts of violence displayed by the Negros in Chicago. He states that as a man of the cloth, Dr. King should be more concerned with convincing Negros to "go back to where they came from."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nemichandra

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding the structure and function of the SCLC. He informs the inquirer that he is enclosing pamphlets and brochures in hopes that the literature will successfully address all of his questions.

Telegram from Nathan Cooper to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960

Referring to Dr. King as a southern fascist, Nathan Cooper telegrams his demands for an immediate two- hour national radio television civil rights debate.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.