Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Albany, GA"

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

Financial Statement Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Sunday, December 31, 1961

In this document, the number of books that were sold during the six month period to December 1961 are shown.

Richard Parrish and Daniel H. Watts Press Release on William Worthy Passport Case

Monday, October 22, 1962

This news release announces plans to picket the American Jewish Congress Award Banquet held for Attorney General Robert Kennedy at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. The Attorney General is to receive an award "for advancing human freedom."

Handwriiten Notecard Regarding Freedom

This notecard written by Dr. Martin Luther King, cites a quote, of Tillich, regarding freedom.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

Friday, September 29, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

Telegram from Bill Barrett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Bill Barrett sends this telegram to Dr. King notifying him of his support of the Committee Bill.

Letter from Lillian Smith to MLK

Thursday, July 7, 1966

Lillian Smith, author of 'Strange Fruit,' writes Dr. King to tell of her current health condition. During this time Ms. Smith was battling breast cancer, and was hopeful she would recover. Smith requests Dr. King to visit upon her return home to Clayton County.

Letter from MLK to Hal Lenke

Dr. King thanks Hal Lenke for investigating the situation in Huntsville, Alabama and reporting his findings to SCLC. He is currently considering Lenke's suggestions. Lenke later coordinated press relations for Resurrection City, the Poor People’s Campaign encampment in Washington, DC.

Emergency Rally--Walk with Dr. Spock for Peace in Vietnam

The following document is promoting a rally for peace in Vietnam. Dr. Benjamin Spock, among others, is scheduled to speak at the rally.

Letter from MLK to Gaynette Henderson

Monday, November 2, 1964

Dr. King regretfully informs Gaynette Henderson that he will be unable to visit the sorority suite of Delta Sigma Theta during his visit to Pennsylvania State University.

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

MLK Announces New Appointment

Dr. King announces the immediate appointment of Jesse Jackson as the Director of Special Projects and Economic Development for SCLC. The new department will focus on "stimulating the development and expansion of Negro businesses and services."

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Frank Emspak, Chairman of the National Coordinating Committee, writes Dr. King requesting SCLC's sponsorship for the anti-war convention. This letter helps track activities of national peace movement.

Primer For Delegates to the Democratic National Convention

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party informs citizens of the mistreatment incurred by African Americans attempting to register to vote and participate in election process. The Party also outlines its journey to sending 64 delegates to the Democratic Convention of 1964 and how President Johnson denied them seats at the Convention.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable E.L. Bartlett

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Alaskan Congressman Edward Lewis Bartlett to express appreciation for his vote in support of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Medical Order for MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

During a private medical visit at St. Joseph Hospital, Dr. James D. Palmer documents a list of orders to be administered to Dr. King.

Letter from Isaac Foster Regarding a Scholarship

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

Isaac Foster, a student at Queens College, informs his reader of reasons why he should be awarded a scholarship.

Cloudy Summit

Sunday, January 15, 1967

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

Friday, November 22, 1963

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

Letter from Rev. J. Edward Lantz to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Rev. Lantz, Executive Director of the Southern Office of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Heardy

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Heardy offering his apologies for being unable to financially assist her. He asserts that the SCLC financial resources are aimed at changing the laws so that a welfare system can be developed to further provide for the less fortunate.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Leon H. Sullivan

Wednesday, October 31, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. Leon Sullivan for visiting Atlanta and delivering a powerful message. Dr. King had asked Rev. Sullivan to come to Atlanta and meet with local ministers to discuss the selective patronage program Sullivan developed in Philadelphia. This program became the model for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from M. Strawder to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

M. Strawder welcomes Dr. King to the Chicago community while informing him of the current social struggles that they are faced with.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. and Mrs. Jones congratulate Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. They send their regrets for not being able to attend the dinner to honor Dr. King's accomplishment.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King addresses the United Neighborhood Houses of New York at the Biltmore Hotel. He focuses on the need to alter the ineffective, piecemeal manner in which the government tries to fight poverty by fighting its symptoms, and instead suggest that the government channel those funds into a new "guaranteed annual income" that will help turn non-producers into consumers. This rough draft of the speech contains Dr. King's handwritten revisions and additions.

Letter from MLK to Richard Nixon

Wednesday, May 15, 1957

Dr. King follows up a conversation he had with the Vice President Richard Nixon while in Ghana. He expresses interest in meeting with him to discuss problems in the South.

Letter from Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. reminds Dr. King that he has written him last November for information for a term paper.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."