The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Arizona (AZ)"

Letter from Gregory Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Virginia (VA)

Mr. Ferguson invites Dr. King to be the commencement speaker for the 1968 graduating class of Berkeley High School in Williamsburg, Virginia. The school can only afford $150 for a speaker, but he feels Dr. King's presence would make a great impact on the student body.

Letter from MLK to Saul S. Sherman

Monday, January 3, 1966
Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Saul S. Sherman for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes how monumental the change for Negroes in the South has been in the last ten years and how revolutionary the future will be thanks to her generous donation.

Letter from J.W. Augustus to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Louisiana (LA)

The Ad Hoc Committee for Good Government of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, issued this letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting his assistance. Director of Political Action for the committee, J. W. Augustus, informed Rev. Abernathy of attempts by white city parish commissioners to buy the votes belonging to Negro political organizations.

Letter from Nancy Parr to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1968
San Francisco, CA

In this letter, Nancy Parr offers help to Dr. King in trying to "avert riots in 1968" to prevent the "right-wing" from taking over the nation.

Letter from S.Leiss to MLK Regarding Dutch Publication Rights

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

S. Leiss sent Dr King this satement regarding a payment for the Dutch rights to "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from C.G. Gomillion to Dr. Randolph Blackwell

Wednesday, August 18, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Tuskegee, AL, Selma, AL

C.G. Gomillion writes Dr. Randolph Blackwell requesting reimbursement for paying the bail to release SCLC driver Walter Franklin. Franklin was arrested and released in Tuskegee, but was arrested again in Selma because the SCLC failed to pay his fine.

Letter from Jimmie Johnson to MLK

Jimmie Johnson writes to Dr. King to say that while he is a Negro, he does not believe in integration. Johnson does not think there will ever be enough jobs in America for Negroes, and therefore argues for segregation. He asks Dr. King to share this view in his upcoming meeting with President Johnson.

MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

Letter from a School Teacher to MLK

A Negro special education teacher of a white class asks Dr. King to send her students a letter. She is teaching them about race relations and believes that a letter from Dr. King would be very encouraging.

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.

Letter from Theresa Sutherland to Coretta S. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Theresa Sutherland sends her condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Telegram from Andrew Hieskell and A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
New York (NY)

Dr. King receives this telegram from Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph regarding the newly appointed chief executive of the National Urban Coalition.

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Oslo, Norway, SWEDEN

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to James M. Kangongoi

Monday, April 16, 1962

Dr. King writes Mr. James M. Kangongoi acknowledging the receipt of his letter and expressing how good it was to meet him in Puerto Rico.

Letter from Paul Shields to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Paul Shields, the News Director of CBS Television in Atlanta, writes to Dr. King to lodge a complaint against the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's press department. He states that press conferences convened by the SCLC rarely begin on time.

Letter From Irene M. Kohlmeyer of WBJC to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966
Baltimore, MD

Irene M. Kohlmeyer, Program Director of WBJC radio at Baltimore Junior College, asks Dr. King for his permission to rebroadcast the transcription of a Phi Beta Kappa address he gave at Johns Hopkins University.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, ISRAEL

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

Holiday Card from Julius and Gloria

This holiday card was sent in good wishes for the recipient from a Julius and Gloria.

Man: Sinner

Referencing Psalms 14:3, Dr. King discusses the completeness of sin in relationship to man.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Letter from James H. Duckrey to MLK

Wednesday, March 11, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

James H. Duckrey, President of Cheyney State College, writes Dr. King asking him to serve as the Commencement Speaker. He briefly discusses the history of the college and informs Dr. King of the Honorarium.

Letter from Rene Remond to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

The "Centre Catholique des Intellectuels Francais" is an organization focused on raising the consciousness levels of its members through public conferences, debates, and discussions. Rene Remond informs Dr. King that they have enclosed additional information to prepare him on the discussion involving Christians and violence.

Letter from Melvin Brisk to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Melvin Brisk, President of Quadrangle Books, requests that Dr. King read Clarence Darrow's book "Verdicts Out of Court." Brisk acknowledges Dr. King's limited time schedule and urges him to pursue a meeting with Darrow to discuss his publication.

Letter from MLK to Glenn Greenwood

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to Glenn Greenwood's letter thanking him for his suggestion regarding the Pentagon directive "in relation to Armed Forces personnel participation in civil rights demonstrations."

Support from Lawyer Grenville Clark to Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech

Thursday, July 28, 1966
New Hampshire (NH), Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter to U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech, Grenville Clark requests a reply to Dr. King's "devastating" public statement in the New York Times about proper enforcement of the 1965 voting rights law.

Telegram from Charles William Butler to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965
Detroit, MI, Baltimore, MD

Charles William Butler, Pastor of New Cavalry Baptist Church, informs Dr. King that he will not be present at a board meeting. The lateness of the invitation and his involvement in Detroit, Michigan prevent his attendance.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Monday, November 28, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.