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Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Letter from Charles R. Bell Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Mr. Bell inquires about a prisoner who was beaten to death in his home state of Alabama.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Saturday, August 31, 1963

Josephine Baker expresses her admiration for Dr. King as a great leader and articulates her commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from SANE Co-Chair Benjamin Spock to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965

Dr. Benjamin Spock, acting as co-chairman of the National Committe for a Sane Nuclear Policy, transmits a telegram to Dr. King inviting him to deliver a speech at Madison Square Garden in reference to Vietnam.

Letter from George W. Jones to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

George W. Jones, of the National Education Association, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an event honoring Negro History Week in Washington, DC.

Letter from L. Martinez to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Mrs. L. Martinez describes to Dr. King what she has observed about the Lawndale area in Chicago, Illinois. She suggests that instead of relocating to other neighborhoods, the tenants of Lawndale initiate a clean up of the area themselves.

Letter from MLK to Evert Svensson

Friday, May 29, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the Nobel Peace Prize Award nomination, but informs Evert Svensson that there are some roadblocks affecting his acceptance. The race problem in America requires his time, energy and presence in order to prevent the offset of violence. Dr. King inquires if the proposed date for the event could be altered.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

And What of Marriage Master?

Marriage vows are handwritten on the backside of this printout of a poem written by Kahlil Gibran entitled, "And What of Marriage Master?".

Letter of Invitation from Elroy C. Sandquist Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, July 19, 1966

In this letter, Mr. Sandquist writes to invite Dr. King to make an address at a luncheon for the City Club of Chicago.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row, informs Dr. King about the enclosure of the first copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Belafonte

Wednesday, September 27, 1961

This program details a 1961 Harry Belafonte concert sponsored by the SCLC.

Letter from Menno Klassen to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Menno Klassen offers support on behalf of the Peace Committee of the Mennonite Central Committee for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Klassen explains that Dr. King is facing the same opposition that Jesus Christ did because he is continuing Jesus' work.

Letter from Paul Johnson to MLK regarding American Politics

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, Paul Johnson tells Dr. King about how there is a concern about the state of the 1968 elections before soliciting Dr. King's response to a series of questions.

Request for Land Reform Bill

An anonymous writer asks Dr. King to petition Congress for a reform bill that would allow all people, irrespective of race, creed or societal status, to own land.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Flyer

This flyer from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which includes a quotation from Dr. King, encourages membership in the organization.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbert Spencer's views on philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Grand Hotel

Dora McDonald sends an additional Grand Hotel reservation request for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies of December 1964.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

The Miami Herald: Who Threw the Bomb?

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

In this newspaper clipping, "Washington Post" columnist Charles Morgan Jr. argues that the responsibility for the Birmingham bombings lies with the entire community.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

White Backlash Growing

Friday, August 26, 1966

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

Letter From Leslie W. Dunbar

Wednesday, September 13, 1961

Leslie Dunbar outlines information regarding a grant and various agency protocols from the Southern Regional Council for voter registration.

Letter From a Very Concerned Christian to MLK

The Christian author of this letter includes a poem to express concern and anguish regarding the War in Vietnam.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.

Letter from Rhoda Dorsey to MLK

Thursday, May 21, 1964

Rhoda Dorsey, Dean and Associate Professor of History at Goucher College, informs Dr. King that they have included "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" on the freshman class reading list.

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1956

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.