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Note - Leewellyn Daniel

The note, shown here, was written by Leewellyn Daniel, of Chicago, Illinois. The handwriting simply states, "Legal action concerning being arrested." However, the addressee of this note and the date it was written is unknown.

Swedish Martin Luther King Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

The Martin Luther King Fund was an internationally housed organization in which numerous countries participated in helping to support and spread Dr. King's messages. This document represents the facts and activity program of the Swedish organization headquartered in Stockholm. Included are lists of the Executive Committee, Honorary Board members, and activities designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's work.

MLK Advocates Registering to Vote

Dr. King urges individuals to join the "march to Freedom" by becoming a registered voter. Dr. King asserts that voting will help educate children, obtain a minimum wage law, and create the opportunity for better medical care.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Mr. Shaefer, Executive Secretary of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests information from Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's scheduled lecture in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Nils K. Stahle to MLK

Friday, November 27, 1964

Nils K. Stahle, Executive Director of the Nobel Foundation, invites Dr. King to visit the Nobel House in Stockholm while he is Sweden for a special ecumenical service.

Letter from Rev. Allen Clark to MLK

Rev. Allen Clark sends Dr. King words of encouragement and requests a copy of a book regarding Dr. King's faith.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

I'll Take My Stand

Thelmore Cooper Trotman composes this poem entitled "Ill Take My Stand." The poem expresses the plight of the Negro struggle and the injustices of a case involving the rights of five Negros. Mr. Trotman elaborates on his personal health as he is of old age and explains his appreciation for Dr. King's organization.

Letter from Martin Peretz to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

In this letter, Martin Peretz of Harvard University, expresses interest in having lunch with Andrew Young, Dr. King and his wife after a Belafonte Concert in Boston.

Christmas Card from the King Family

Coretta Scott King sends out a Christmas card from herself and her children.

Letter from Linda Witt to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Linda Witt, who is conducting research for a school project, asks Dr. King questions about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Holiday Card from Dr. Nirmal Kumar Bose

The following document is a holiday card from Dr. Bose to Dr. and Mrs. King.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Relationship of State Units to the National Office

This document outlines the relationship between the national office of the SCLC and state level institutions, referred to as "State Units."

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Letter of Invite From Coval Bryant MacDonald to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966

In this letter, Minister Coval Bryant MacDonald invites Dr. King to speak with the minsters and priest of The Greater Oak Ministerial Association.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Nonviolent Leaders

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Gaulan

Wednesday, July 31, 1963

This is a letter from Dr. King to Joseph Gaulan to thank him for the letter of support while he was in the Birmingham jail.

Memorandum from Stanley Levison Regarding Congressman Powell

Monday, September 19, 1966

This memorandum from Mr. Levison concerns legal issues regarding Congressman Adam Clayton Powell. His position is that those issues, valid or not, need examination in the overall context of "the real issue...the undemocratic nature of the congressional system."

Receipt to the Motown Record Corporation

Monday, October 3, 1966

The following receipt was issued by the SCLC to the Motown Record Corporation for their financial contribution.

Letter from MLK to the Lamar W. Sessoms Family

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King replies to the Sessoms' previous letter that requested assistance in alleviating racial inequality in Mississippi. King informs them that the first step is to "urge the struggle in our own community," and the second step is for everyone to "join together across the nation with people of good will and combat the evils of racism and injustice."

Letter from C.G. Gomillion to Dr. Randolph Blackwell

Wednesday, August 18, 1965

C.G. Gomillion writes Dr. Randolph Blackwell requesting reimbursement for paying the bail to release SCLC driver Walter Franklin. Franklin was arrested and released in Tuskegee, but was arrested again in Selma because the SCLC failed to pay his fine.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Flyer

This flyer from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which includes a quotation from Dr. King, encourages membership in the organization.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.