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Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Letter from Vera M. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Inspired by an article in the Saturday Evening Post, Vera Jones congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

David Williams asks MLK to Visit Community Center

Friday, January 12, 1968

David A. Williams writes to Dr.King asking him to visit the local community center while on his trip to speak at the college in Manhattan, Kansas. He explains some of the trouble the local community is facing, such as a proposed highway that would disrupt his neighborhood and community center, as well as housing discrimination.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Telegram from the Bailey Family to Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958

The Bailey family welcomes Dr. King home.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Letter from Norman Baugher, Galen Ogden and W. Harold Row to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Prominent officials from the Church of the Brethren's Committee on Race Relations writes Dr. King informing him of the power of television in promoting nonviolence. Since many individuals around the nation are unfamiliar with the practices of nonviolence, Norman Baugher, Galen Oden and W. Harold Row recommend that Dr. King call upon various associates to appear on television and educate the public on the nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

Letter from Jodi Moses to MLK about TAC Rally

Thursday, May 26, 1966

The Community Relations Committee of the Tenant's Action Council (TAC) writes this letter to Dr. King asking him to speak at a rally being held at the Olivet Community Presbyterian Church in Chicago, Illinois.

Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

This is a financial statement for Dr. King's book "Stride Towards Freedom".

Immortality

Dr. King finds the best description of the unknowable nature of immortality in the New Testament of the Bible. It is a fragment of 1 Corinthians 2:9 regarding heaven.

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Invitation from Clarence Williams to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966

Clarence Williams invites Dr. King to a campaign kick-off rally sponsored by the Dallas County Independent Free Voters Organization.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Monday, February 8, 1965

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter Dated 12/7/62 from MLK's Secretary to Mel Arnold

Friday, December 7, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a enclosure of the sermon entitled "Broken Dreams."

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Thursday, February 22, 1968

In this response letter to Hugh Daugherty, Dr. King extends his deep appreciation for contributions made to the SCLC. The reverend also apologizes for the delay in response.

Telegram from Roland Wolf

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this Western Union telegram, Roland Wolf requests Dr. King's appearance on a "conversation show" with one or two writers, allowing an opportunity to learn his views on existing issues.

Letter from Roosevelt Zanders to MLK

Sunday, June 3, 1962

Roosevelt Zanders expresses his appreciation to Dr. King after receiving a kind letter and personal autographed copy of "Stride Toward Freedom." Zanders expresses his appreciation for the luncheon in Washington, D. C. and states his desire to visit the Reverend again.

Letter from Gloria Cantor to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967

Gloria Cantor, of Belafonte Enterprises, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting copies of Dr. King's speech at the Spring Mobilization.

MLK to Bill Moyers of Newsday

Friday, May 19, 1967

Dr. King writes to Bill Moyers of NEWSDAY and apologizes for not responding to his letter in a timely manner.

Letter from Dottie Hughes to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, October 27, 1964

Mrs. Hughes, a resident of Zambia, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She informs Dr. and Mrs. King that their efforts are being recognized in Africa.

Letter From John Payak to Mrs. King & Family

Tuesday, April 16, 1968

John Payak offers condolences from a religious perspective to Mrs. King and family.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

SCLC Board Meeting Minutes

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

These minutes from the board meeting of the SCLC detail future directions and past victories, as well as current issues.

The Alberton Family Sends Condolence Offerings

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

The Albertson family sends to Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Young their condolences for Dr. King's death in the form of contribution and encouraging words.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.