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Telegram from Arnold Aronson to MLK

Arnold Aronson requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights endorsing the anti-poverty bill.

Letter from MLK to Alyce Bledsoe

Monday, July 12, 1965

Dr. King thanks the Women's Auxiliary to the Charles R. Drew Medical Society for its contribution to the SCLC. The contribution will be used to send California students to assist in voter registration projects.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines John Dewey's views on Metaphysics. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches, sermons, and writings.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Edward Taylor, an African American soldier in Vietnam, requests Dr. King's aid in a military justice matter.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Reason

Dr. King quotes a passage from Karl Barth's "Word of God and the Word of Man," regarding reason.

Birthday Card from Belle and Cleveland to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Belle and Cleveland entitled, "North, South, East or West."

Invitation from Nuhu Bamali to Dr. and Mrs. King

Dr. and Mrs. King receive an invitation to a reception from the Chairman of the Nigerian Delegation to the Twentieth Session of the General Assembly and Deputy Foreign Minister.

Mind

Dr. King writes on Herbert Spencer's interpretation of the mind.

Mission Development Report

Sunday, January 1, 1967

This report outlines the structure and development of the North Carolina Leadership Training Project.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967

T. K. Mahadevan, of the Gandhi Peace Foundation in New Delhi, India, refers to potential meetings with Dr. King and his colleagues.

Letter from Saul Miller to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Saul Miller, Director of the Department of Publications for the AFL-CIO, writes Dr. King requesting him to write a description of the activities of the SCLC. This write-up will be featured in the November issue of the AFL-CIO magazine, which will be devoted entirely to the issue of civil rights.

Old Age

Dr. King discusses the topic of old age. He references French poet Victor Hugo quoting, "winter was on his head but eternal spring was in his heart."

Letter from Washington University to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Faculty of the Political Science Department at Washington University release a resolution supporting Dr. King and his efforts to secure voting rights for Negroes in Selma, Alabama. They urge the Federal Government to take a serious look at this issue following recent attacks upon Negroes trying to exercise their right to vote.

Memorandum from Pacem In Terris II to All Participants

This memorandum from the Pacem In Terris II Secretariat issues detailed arrival and departure instructions to all participants of the Pacem In Terris Convocation. General conference information is also included. Translated as "Peace on Earth," the event was held in Geneva, Switzerland and accommodated participants from around the world. Dr. King attended the conference and delivered an address.

Conversion

Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

Education Versus Religion

Dr. King records notes about the leadership of the intellectual and religious communities from Edwin E. Aubrey's "Present Theological Tendencies."

Letter from Beverly A. Asbury and David W. Stroh to the S.C.L.C.

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, dated January 4, 1968, the chaplains at Benton Chapel of Vanderbilt University enclose a check of support to the S.C.L.C.

Letter from John G. Hodgson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966

John G. Hudson requests that Dr. King use Hodgson Travel Service for an upcoming trip to the Holy Land.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Morality

Dr. King documents a quote from British statesman John Morley regarding the morality of war. Dr. King refers to the quote, taken from Morley's publication "Recollection," as a "grand, potent monosyllable." Following the citation, Dr. King comments, "This is an agnostic talking."

Notecard Regarding Freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his insights on the concept of freedom.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

Statement on CORE Supportive Action Against Variety Chain Store Discrimination in the South

Sunday, February 12, 1961

The Congress of Racial Equality issues a statement regarding economic boycotts of chain stores in the North that have segregated stores in the South. These boycotts are in support of desegregation efforts in the South.

God

Dr. King quotes Dr. William Temple, stating that "God minus the world equals God; the world minus God equals nothing."

MLK Letter re Harvey Cox Book

Dr. King drafts a response to a request for permission to be quoted in Rev. Cox's book, God's Revolution and Man's Responsibility.

Letter from Alfred Norwood to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Alfred Norwood writes to Dr. King highlighting his experiences as a student at Lincoln school, Berkeley, California.

Letter from M. C. Chagla to MLK

On behalf of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations, the president, C. Chagla invites Dr. King to deliver the seventh series of Azad Memorial Lectures.