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Telegram from Clark Macgregor to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Clark Macgregor sends a telegram to Dr. King informing him of his vote against the dismissal of the Mississippi Challenge.

Sin

Dr. King references Dewey and his view of evil.

Sermon Text (Habakkuk)

Dr. King examines Habakkuk chapter 1, verses 2 through 4 to discuss whether the inequalities of life are justification to question God.

Letter from John Shirley to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

John Shirley, of the Oxford University Cherwell Newspaper, poses a list of questions to Dr. King concerning Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, and the emergence of Black Power groups. Shirley assures the Reverend of his gratitude for any feedback he may provide, and informs him of the circulation of the literature at being well over 10,000 within the University.

Letter from Gunnar Magnus to MLK Requesting Interview

Tuesday, October 18, 1966

Mr. Magnus, a Norwegian journalists and student at Davidson College in North Carolina, requests Dr. King grant an interview for his paper, the "Morgenbladet".

Royalty Statement for "Strength To Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement reference royalties from Dr. King's french-language edition book, "Strength To Love", published by Castermann s.a.

Nonviolent Leaders

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dora McDonald regarding copies of books that she requested Dr. King to autograph for the libraries of Mr. Enoch and Mr. Weybright. She asks Dora about their whereabouts and adds a request for Dr. King to autograph a copy for herself.

Congratulatory Letter from YWCA to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

The YWCA congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

Telegram from Howard Farkas to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Farkas writes Dr. King asking him to address the recent acts of violence targeting African Americans.

Power

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Bible

Dr. King compares the views of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Friedrich Schleiermacher on the Christian Bible.

Letter from John H. Hatcher to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

John H. Hatcher of Circle K International invites Dr. King to speak at "A Study of State Government." This event will contain several state and national leaders. The date of this document has close proximity to the Memphis march and Dr. King's assassination.

Letter to MLK from Rual Boles

Wednesday, March 8, 1967

Mr. Boles, a businessman in Chicago, thanks Dr. King, Rev. Jackson, and the SCLC staff for contributing to the success of his struggling business. He is also appreciative for the efforts of Operation Breadbasket in equipping Negro-owned small businesses to effectively compete in the American economy.

Letter from Elaine Attias to MLK

Monday, November 13, 1967

Elaine Attias of the Jewish Federation Council follows up on a previous request for Dr. King to appear on the television series "Commitment Profiles." She mentions other prominent people who have participated, including former Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Mr. Jones, on behalf of the Council for Co-operative Action, invites Dr. King to speak at their function in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

The Georgia State Senate

Friday, September 2, 1966

The Georgia State Senate informs fellow Democrats of an important meeting before the 1966 Primary Election. This meeting will focus on finalizing plans for their participation in this election.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Invitation for the Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

This is an invitation for the Inauguration of the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Direction of the Movement

The author expresses her opinion about Dr. King and how he should use his "impressive" vocabulary in the right direction. She further elaborates on her perceptions of the police protection, mobs, labor needs, and more.

Letter from Marguerite B. Pilling to Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Marguerite B. Pilling writes Dr. Abernathy to show her support of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes the Negro could actually bring the United States back to a time of decency by bringing back prayer in public schools and removing violence from TV.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Attorney Solomon Seay, Jr.

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Reverend Williams writes to Attorney Seay requesting advance notice, of three to four weeks, for persons appearing in court. He also states that it would be helpful if he would give the dates of the arrests and the charges.

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Religion

Dr. King records a definition of religion from Wieman and Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."