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The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

Telegram from Joseph Lowery to Wyatt Walker

Friday, November 3, 1967

Reverend Joseph E. Lowery writes to Reverend Wyatt Walker acknowledging his support of Walker's "sacrifice in behalf of freedom and justice for all."

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Monday, July 30, 1962

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harvey L. Gault

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King informs Reverend Harvey Gault that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at Bethel A. M. E. Church. Dr. King lists some of his present and future commitments in explaining the capacity of his schedule.

Letter from Areatha G. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Areatha G. Bailey, President of the Highland Park Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Fund Dinner.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

The Tabernacle Baptist Church

The Tabernacle Baptist Church publishes this program for their Young Adult Sunday on March 20, 1960. Dr. King is listed to deliver the sermon at morning worship service.

Letter to MLK from Joan Daves about New Publication

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves reports to Dr. King a proposal for a French edition of "Strength to Love" based on a specified advance and royalty.

Sin

Dr. King offers two possible interpretations of Psalms 53:1.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

SCLC's Tom Offenburger requests Dr. King's permission to go to Cleveland to do a story on the Cleveland Project.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Moisa Bulboaca

Monday, May 16, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Louisiana native Moisa Bulboaca invites Dr. King to visit Romania. Ms. McDonald states Dr. King is involved in the freedom struggle and at the present time will be unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from Leonard E. Smith to MLK

Friday, October 6, 1967

Leonard Smith writes to Dr. King concerning a new venture of the National Sharecroppers Fund, which seeks to invest Negro business captial in Southeastern farming areas to benefit the rural poor.

Memo from Stroy Freeman to Englewood Clergy

In this memo, Stroy Freeman informs the Englewood Clergy of Dr. King's attendance for the "withdrawal of accounts campaign" from Chicago City Bank.

Operation Breadbasket Food Store Agreement

Economic conditions begin to change as High-Low Foods and the ministers of Operation Breadbasket team up to provide better opportunities for African Americans.

Letter from Labor Union President Michael Quill to MLK

Friday, November 30, 1962

Michael Quill, International President of the Transport Workers Union of America, encloses a copy of their 11th Constitutional Convention minutes to Dr. King. He also thanks him for his words at their convention and his contribution to the labor movement in America.

Letter from James McKee to Dora McDonald Concerning MLK's Antioch Commencement Address

Friday, April 2, 1965

James McKee, Chief of the Yellow Springs Police Department, writes Dora McDonald regarding security arrangements for Dr. King's visit to Yellow Springs, Ohio for Antioch College's Commencement.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, January 28, 1963

Irv Kupcinet, columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, offers Dr. King recognition for his appearance his TV show. He thanks Dr. King for his significant contribution to the overall success of the program.

Letter from Reverend William D.F. Morris to MLK

Sunday, December 20, 1964

Rev. William D. F. Morris, of Centennial United Church in Toronto, invites Dr. King to visit his church during Lent.

Letter from Geraldine Fothergill to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963

Geraldine Fothergill, a mother of seven of Hartford, Connecticut, offers Dr. King an idea about educating African American youths. She suggests that African American families develop a boarding program to house African American students that are accepted at traditionally white colleges distant from home. She also suggests that Dr. King, as a minister, can convince other ministers to support this program through the churches.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

SCLC Mail Log: February 26, 1968

Monday, February 26, 1968

This is a one-day mail log for incoming mail addressed to Dr. King and other SCLC associates. As an organizational tactic, the log kept track of the high volume of correspondences that came through the office.

Error

This set of note cards written by Dr. King explores the causation of error. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature" noting several reasons as to the rise of error.

Dexter Echo: April 6, 1960

Wednesday, April 6, 1960

This edition of The Dexter Echo addressed to Dr.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Stern Shanis

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Dora McDonald acknowledges Harry Shanis' earlier letter. She sends a photograph of Dr. King along with a biographical sketch.

Southern Leaders Conference letter to Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957

Ministers meeting at the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration co-signed this letter to Pres. Eisenhower.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

Friday, August 6, 1965

Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

Letter from Wallis E. Wood to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Wood requests an interview with Dr. King to discuss Operation Breadbasket.