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Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Report of the Insurgent Editor's Conference

These minutes of the "Insurgent Newspaper Editor's Conference" record the events of the conference from start to finish. The minutes also describe prominent topics of the conference, including the difficulties publishing an insurgent newspaper on a tight budget, reaching a large audience, and generating powerful content. The minutes end on a positive note: "a good time was had by all."

God

Dr. King records a portion of Carl Jung's argument that God is a function of the unconscious.

Letter from Dora to Joan

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this letter, Dora McDonald sends a photograph to Joan Daves.

Dagmar Wilson: Women Strike for Peace

This flyer informs readers about Women's Strike for Peace and details about an upcoming talk by Dagmar Wilson.

MLK Itinerary

This is Dr. King's itinerary for the period December 28 thru January 1 for an unknown year.

Volunteers Serving Program

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

SCLC Minutes

This undated and unsigned memorandum functions essentially as minutes for an SCLC strategy session.

Letter from Medora S. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Medora Bass, member of the Planned Parenthood Association in Philadelphia, invites Dr. King to speak at their annual luncheon. Bass states, "You would render a great service to the underprivileged in Philadelphia."

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

Justice in Mississippi

Dora McDonald records notes by Dr. King concerning an unjust ruling in Mississippi. He claims that more legislation is needed to enable the federal courts to prosecute these crimes.

Letter from David E. McGuire to All Members of First Westminster Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

The Session of the First Westminster Presbyterian Church, Yonkers, NY urges a "write-in" campaign to federal, state, or municipal legislators requesting action in the areas of open housing, equal employment opportunities and civil rights.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Selfishness

Dr. King cites Schopenhauer's book "The World as Will and Ideas" and records a passage on selfishness.

Letter from James A. Dombrowski Regarding S.C.E.F. Contribution

In this document, James A. Dombrowski, the Executive Director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. requests a $10.00 contribution.

Letter from John H. Sengstacke to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1957

Mr. Sengstacke informs Dr. King that he will be presented with the Certificate of Award in honor of his selection to the 1956 Chicago Defender Honor Roll.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Home Rule

Dr. King urges President Johnson to support the administration bill on Home Rule for Washington, D.C. rather than pursue a compromise.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy expressing that there is only one God.

Letter from a Tenant to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Dr. King received many unsigned letters from tenants in sub-standard housing in urban areas. Chicago was one of the main cities because Dr. King actually lived and conducted SCLC business there for a time. A tenant from a Chicago apartment complex writes to Dr. King suggesting that he discreetly visit the building to learn first hand of the unacceptable living conditions.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King writes notes on perceiving God using Nelson Henry Wieman's text, "The Source of Human God."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. G. Baker

Friday, July 30, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Baker, President of the Bethune Art and Study Club, for her monetary contribution to the SCLC. King explains that each contribution is necessary for the SCLC to fulfill all its tasks.

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. M. Lawson Jr.

Friday, October 25, 1963

Dr. King writes Rev. Lawson to express his appreciation for the financial contribution to the SCLC from Protestant missionaries. Dr. King states that they will seek to make sure that a student involved in a recent tragedy in Birmingham, Alabama benefits from the contribution.

Letter from MLK to Walter Harding

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the dedication of Walter Hardin's book. Walter Hardin was considered a distinguished professor and scholar at State University College of Geneseo, New York.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Schiltz

Tuesday, October 12, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Schiltz for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the significance of their contribution.