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The Suffering Servant

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College for 1944-1948

Tuesday, November 7, 1950
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College from 1944-1948.

Letter from John A. McDermott to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago asks Dr. King, as a former John F. Kennedy award winner, to write a telegram of congratulations to the current nominee. This year's recipient, Reverend Richard Morrisroe, was shot and wounded in Alabama the previous summer while campaigning for civil rights.

Telegram from CEP & SCLC to Essie Bizzell

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Selma, AL, Georgia (GA)

Staff from the CEP and SCLC inform Essie Bizzell that a chartered bus will be leaving from the SCLC office for McIntosh, Georgia and they are taking care of all the expenses.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Essie M. Perry

Thursday, January 3, 1963
Tennessee (TN), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Essie M. Perry to discuss Dr. King's availability to speak at Lane College for the 50th Anniversary of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Dr. King informs Mrs. McDonald that his schedule is too strenuous to engage into this wonderful opportunity.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Letter from John Due Jr. to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL

Mr. Due writes Dr. King to offer his services as a Field Representative for the SCLC. He provides a summary of his Civil Rights background along with a list of character references.

Letter from Elmer Jordan Admonishing MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968
Chicago, IL

In this letter dated February 12, 1968, Elmer Jordan writes, "your ideas will cause your death because of your heart" as he advises Dr. King to refrain from his "threatening proposals.".

Letter from MLK to Jefferson Poland

Friday, November 16, 1962
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Dr. King thanks Mr. Poland for sharing his story and comments that the story shows "that it is possible to grow and change after a long heritage of prejudice."

Letter from Halevy H. Simmons to MLK

Wednesday, October 3, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

New York-based architect Halevy H. Simmons offers his professional services to rebuild Negro churches in the state of Georgia.These pillars of Negro culture were targeted throughout the state in a series of racially motivated hate crimes.

Letter from Oakleigh Ross Bush to MLK

Saturday, June 25, 1966
Texas (TX)

Oakleigh Ross Bush discusses the significance of author Joel Candler Harris with Dr. King. Bush also tells Dr. King about a book of Harris' work, which Bush edited. Bush currently is trying to get the book published, but needs a forward written by "an eminent American Negro" in order for publishers to accept the manuscript.

Letter from Jack Thayer to Mrs. King

Friday, January 19, 1968
Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Jack Thayer, of KLAC Radio, writes to Mrs. King thanking her for a recent guest appearance on "Two-Way Radio," in Southern California.

Letter from Anna Gallaspy to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966
Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA

Anna Gallaspy, Production Director of the Immanuel United Church of Christ in Los Angeles, extends an invitation for Dr. King and members of the SCLC to review their outline of a youth festival pilot program.

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967
North Carolina (NC)

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967
Missouri (MO), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Milwaukee, WI, VIETNAM, Dallas, TX

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

The Answer to a Perplexing Question

ISRAEL

"Why Could Not We Cast Him Out?" is a chapter in Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." In this chapter, Dr. King discusses the methods in which man attempts to deal with evil in the world. Two methodologies are distinguished. The first concerns man's independent attempt to remove evil and the second stems from man's ideology of making God solely responsible for eliminating evil. Dr. King concludes that neither method is successful and that man has to find a medium between the two.

Letter from Paul R. Trumpler to MLK

Friday, May 25, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Paul Trumpler writes Dr. King expressing how he and his wife are pleased to have the chance to support Dr. King's work. They believe in Dr. King's ideas regarding racial issues and solutions. Trumpler encloses a check written out to Dr. King so he can use the money as he designate.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

City Wide Freedom Rally Featuring MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964
Ohio (OH)

This 1964 program from a rally in Canton, Ohio, features Dr. King as speaker.

Letter from Otto Emil Geppert to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Memphis, TN

In this letter, Otto Emil Geppert expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and encloses a monetary contribution to Dr. King, in support of his nonviolent approach.

Forgiveness

Dr. King writes on the topic of "forgiveness," as mentioned in Nehemiah 9:17.

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1960
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

Letter from Robert J. Beaubien to MLK

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Robert Beaubien congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the weakness of "non theistic humanism."

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, BRAZIL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King expressing the urgency that the Methodist Church of Brazil receive a reply to their invitation for him to speak at their Centennial celebration in Brazil.

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

DENMARK

Dr. King's secretary forwards him information for an event in Copenhagen in which his presence is requested. Dr. King's brief response is indicated on the top of the memo.

Sermon Notes on Character

This document contains Dr. King's notes on character.

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Wyatt Tee Walker

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King's secretary sends Wyatt Tee Walker information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway.