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Letter from W. A. Rutherford to James Orange

Friday, December 15, 1967

Mr. Rutherford encourages Reverend Orange to be patient regarding his request for a raise, which must receive Dr. King's final approval.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965

Bent Ostergaard, a member of Amnesty International, informs Dr. King that his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize served as a great pleasure for the Danish people. The Danish section of Amnesty International requests Dr. King's appearance during his travel to Europe. Mr. Ostergaard notifies Dr. King that his expenses will be covered and they would like to give him a tour of the public institutions in Denmark.

Letter from James C. Goodwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 8, 1967

Mr. Goodwin, Executive Director of the Bay Area Neighborhood Development Non-profit Foundation, informs Dr. King of an artist who would like to present him the painting "Give Me a Future."

Letter to Mr. Walter Simcich from MLK

Tuesday, September 7, 1965

Dr. King informs Walter Simcich that he is "deeply grateful" to have been extended this invitation. Furthermore, Dr. King notifies Mr. Simcich that he is unable to accept this speaking engagement due to his heavy schedule involving the nonviolence movement.

Letter from Matthew Schechter to MLK Regarding NAACP

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

Mr. Schechter encloses correspondences between hm and the NAACP regarding Dr. King's comments on the Vietnam War and the civil rights movements. Mr. Schechter is returning his membership card due to the NAACP's "uncalled for commentary" concerning Dr. King. Mr. Morsell, Assistant Executive Director of the NAACP, informs Mr. Schechter that the NAACP took a position on the issue because of numerous requests they received from local members and leaders.

Letter and Questionnaire from Ronald B. Lee to MLK

Ronald B. Lee, a student of American University, requests that Dr. King complete a questionnaire concerning the SCLC's involvement in the June White House Conference "To Fulfill These Rights." The questions include how the SCLC was informed of this meeting, the conference, contributions, and more.

Letter from Barbara W. Moffett to William Rutherford

Monday, January 8, 1968

Barbara Moffett discusses the possibility of coordinating efforts and collaborative participation between the American Friends Service Committee and SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Professor William Goldsmith

Thursday, October 17, 1963

Dr. King sends his appreciation to Professor William Goldsmith for the contribution made by the students and faculty of Brandeis University to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

The Lynching Tree

Jerry Peace writes the poem "The Lynching Tree" which illustrates the pain involved with lynching black people.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

American Negro Corporation Plan

This document is a plan created by Sterling B. Conaway. The purpose was to create a business organization for Negro professionals to invest in their future. This document also outlines the purpose and priorities of the organization.

Western Union Telegram from James McDaniel to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Mr. McDaniel invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the executive committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Letter from Committee on Racial Justice

Sunday, February 11, 1968

In this letter, the Committee on Racial Justice provides update on their activities and encouragement.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

This document is a royalty statement from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. for his text "Stride Toward Freedom". June 14, 1967

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informed Dr. King that “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" would not be able to be converted into a paperback book. Joan Daves is Dr. King’s literary agent.

SCLC Staff

Thursday, March 9, 1967

This is a list of the SCLC staff members, their positions, and their responsibilities.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 23, 1965

This statement from Dr. King?s literary agent reflects monies earned from the German pocketbook edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967

Senator Robert Kennedy declines Dr. King's invitation to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's 10th Anniversary Convention in Atlanta, Georgia.

Man (Divided Against Himself)

Referencing the liberal German historian Friedrich Meinecke, Dr. King describes a philosophy on politics as it relates to humanity and one's morals.

MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Letter from Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale to Joan Daves

Friday, March 17, 1967

Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale informs Joan Daves of an international meeting on the problems of New Africa in Palermo, Italy. It is noted that Santi Ando & Figli would like for Dr. King to lecture in Rome, Milan, Florence, Torino & Bolgna and provide photographs they may use in their promotion campaign for Dr. King's books.

Letter from Rev. John B. Morris to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

Rev. John B. Morris writes Dr. King while he is in the city jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Morris asserts that Dr. King's stay in jail will "renew strength to the student movement."

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

This letter from Mr. Harry Daniels to Dr. King addresses, among other things, Medicare, the upcoming presidential election, and government lending.

Letter Withdrawing Support From Gordon Delsemer to Dr. King

Thursday, October 19, 1967

This letter dated October 20, 1967, was sent to Dr. King from Gordon H. Delsemer. Mr. Delsemer is withdrawing his support from the SCLC because of the "anti-Semitic" statements he believes were made by certain black leaders.