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Methodology, Tests of Truth

Dr. King discusses Henry Nelson Wieman's test of truth in religion described in "The Source of Human Good."

Letter From Andrew Young to Chris Folcker

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

In this letter, Andrew Young thanks Chris Folcker for his work with the Martin Luther King Fund, the Europe-wide fundraising campaign on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Dr. King. Young praises the "tremendous success" of the fund.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Doctrines

Dr. King records a definition of the word "doctrine."

For Healing of The Nations

Sunday, February 14, 1954

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

MLK to Confer in June to Plan Summer Drive Here

Monday, May 29, 1967

Referencing Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Bob Modic wrote about an upcoming meeting in Cleveland, Ohio. This meeting was in preparation for the implementation of a campaign to increase employment and housing opportunities for the city's African Americans.

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Letter from Samuel Abbott to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Samuel Abbott asks Dr. King for a personal favor in writing the preface for his recent publication.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Stern Shanis

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Dora McDonald acknowledges Harry Shanis' earlier letter. She sends a photograph of Dr. King along with a biographical sketch.

Letter from Alex Miselson to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

Alex Miselson suggests that Dr. King, the SCLC, and other leading civil rights group make the education of African American youth a priority.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Letter from Polly G. to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962

Polly G. writes Dr. King informing him that her class is creating reports on famous people. She has chosen to write her report on Dr. King and asks him to assist her by sending some additional material along with a photograph.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

William Rutherford recounts his difficulties trying to contact Dr. King while he was in the United States. He goes on to express interest in doing fundraising programs for SCLC in Europe, as well as, mobilizing public opinion in support of the cause.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King addresses his concerns about the rise of anti-Semitism in Germany.

Beyond Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Judaism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Joseph Klausner's book "From Jesus to Paul" regarding Judaism. Joseph Klausner was a Jewish historian.

Press Conference Statement on New York

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Dr. King addresses the city of New York and the problem of mounting violence. Dr. King urges the city to help take a stand by promoting social justice through nonviolence efforts and strategies.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

MLK's Newsweek Statement

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King issues a statement on the defeat of a federal agency that would have allowed an African American to obtain a cabinet position within the national government.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Saturday, March 31, 1962

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King for afternoon tea to discuss ongoing issues in Deerfield, Illinois with Rev. Bletzer and members of the American Freedom of Residence Fund.

Statistics on Birmingham, Alabama

This sheet shows Negro vs. White Populations in Birmingham, Alabama in regards to voting. It also shows the working wages of the Negro Population according to an article in the Saturday Evening Post.

Telegram from MLK to President John F. Kennedy

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King sends an urgent telegram to President Kennedy recommending Judge William Hastie and Judge Thurgood Marshall be given serious consideration for a seat on the Supreme Court.

Letter from Rev. Oliver W. Holmes to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 23, 1964

Reverend Oliver Holmes confirms the possibility of a meeting between Dr. King and Mrs. Leonard Faber, a graduate student in religion. Her dissertation involves Dr. King, German monk and theologian Martin Luther and Jewish philosopher Martin Buber.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Moisa Bulboaca

Monday, May 16, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Louisiana native Moisa Bulboaca invites Dr. King to visit Romania. Ms. McDonald states Dr. King is involved in the freedom struggle and at the present time will be unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from William W. Stafford to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

William Stafford expresses admiration, gratitude and support for Dr. King's work with the Civil Rights Movement and his stand against the Vietnam War.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

Friday, May 31, 1957

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.