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"Atlanta, GA"

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, London, England, Illinois (IL)

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

Graduate Candidate Notice from Boston University

Monday, December 7, 1953
Boston, MA

This is a notice to all possible candidates for the degree of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in June or August of 1954. The notice explains what is required of those who wish to obtain their degree by these dates.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jacob Broertjes

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
NETHERLANDS

Dora McDonald sends Jacob Broertjes a tentative schedule for Dr. King's upcoming speaking engagement in Amsterdam with the Baptist Federation.

A Plan for Establishing Independently Owned and Operated Businesses in Inner City Areas

New York (NY)

This document explains the need for independently owned and operated businesses in the city of Rochester, NY. It explains the path towards business development and the role that Kodak might play in encouraging that development.

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Chicago, IL, Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM, PUERTO RICO

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter from Helen G. Frumin to Coretta Scott King

Monday, December 5, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Frumin writes Mrs. King to request sponsorship for the Committee of Responsibility. She includes a list of others who have agreed to sponsor the organization among which is Dr. Benjamin Spock, affluent pediatrician and anti-war activist, and other prestigious figures.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Reading, Writing, and Race Relations

Thursday, June 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dorothy Singer wrote this piece,"Reading, Writing and Race Relations", regarding the racial integration in schools. Singer discusses several studies and their findings regarding integration.

What's Your Brotherhood Quotient?

National Comics Publications, Inc. publishes this questionnaire as a public service to gauge the attitudes of readers while also enlightening readers about their own xenophobic perceptions. The writer asserts that it is okay to dislike vegetables or insects, but to dislike people is to "hurt them and cheat yourself."

Western Union Telegram Sent to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Richard Charles Boone 1965

Friday, November 5, 1965
Texas (TX)

Richard Charles Boone sent Dr. King this 1965 telegram informing him of possible racial hostility in Miami between the black community and Cuban immigrants moving into the city.

The Central Presbyterian Church Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966
Denver, CO, JORDAN

Elmer Elsea enlightens Dr. King on how his involvement with the previous Holy Week brought joy and blessings. Mr. Elsea discovers Dr. King will be returning to the Holy Land of Jerusalem for the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom. Mr. Elsea encourages Dr. King to utilize Citexco Tours to conduct his expedition.

Letter from MLK to Dorothy Cotton

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King requests that Mrs. Cotton present a report on the present status and grant of CEP for an upcoming SCLC executive meeting.

Letter from Bo Wirmark to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Atlanta, GA, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL

Bo Wirmark writes Dr. King to clarify the misconception behind Vilgot Sjoman's film "I Am Curious (Yellow)," and explain how his interview is being used in the film. Wirmark also extends an invitation for Dr. King to visit Uppsala, Sweden.

Card from Sophia Anderson to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mrs. Sophia Anderson wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery.

The Negro Heritage Library

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), BURUNDI, CAMEROON, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, CHAD, CONGO / ZAIRE, ETHIOPIA, GABON, GAMBIA, GHANA, GUINEA, Co'te D'IVOIRE / IVORY COAST, KENYA, LIBERIA, MALAWI, MALI, NIGER, NIGERIA, RWANDA, SENEGAL, SIERRA LEONE, TOGO, UGANDA, ZAMBIA

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Everett Gendler

Monday, December 2, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Virginia (VA)

Dr. King thanks Rabbi Gendler for his significant contribution to the SCLC. He asserts that the financial contributions will aid in the SCLC's political and social agendas in Danville, Virginia.

Aristotle

Dr. King cites Aristotle's ideas regarding matter and form.

Anonymous Letter from Jail - Birmingham, AL

Birmingham, AL

In this letter an anonymous writer shares his gratitude for all the support extended as Dr. King and his colleagues were incarcerated at a jail in Birmingham, AL.

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

Letter from Edwin Hoffman to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965
West Virginia (WV)

Dr. Edwin Hoffman invites Dr. King to address the American Affairs Forum at West Virginia State College. Dr. Hoffman hopes Dr. King can take time from his very limited schedule to attend the college's convocation.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Memo from Barbara Moffett to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

Barbara W. Moffett writes a memorandum to Dr. King and Harry Wachtel, commenting on a second draft statement submitted by the American Friends Service Committee to the SCLC. Ms. Moffett also sends a copy of the memo with a handwritten note to Andy Young.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 1, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Annalee Stewart confirms with Dora McDonald that Dr. King will be the keynote speaker for the 50th Anniversary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Telegram from the Faculty of Howard University School of Law to MLK

Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

The faculty of Howard University's Law School offers to assist Dr. King in the fight against social injustice in Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Edwin and Louise Flowers

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Cincinnati, OH, Atlanta, GA

In this correspondence to Mr. Edwin C. and Mrs. Louise M. Flowers from Dr. King, he wanted to personally thanked Mr. Edwin and Mrs. Flowers for their generous contribution to SCLC and to express his appreciation and gratitude for their support toward the Civil Right Movement.

Excerpt: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" 1967

Sunday, July 2, 1967
Indiana (IN)

The "Quote" publication, from Indianapolis, issued a review of Dr. King's last book. Under the heading, "Book Review in Quotes", a preview of 10 quotations from "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" are listed, in this document. Black power, nonviolence and other subject matters are highlighted in the quotations. Dr. King's book was published and released in 1967.

Program for Mass Meeting with MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Dr. King spoke at the Scott High School Field House in Toledo. Mayor John W. Potter opened the program with an official welcome to the city and Rev. Robert Culp welcomed the prticipants on behalf of the Toledo Chapter of the NAACP. Rev. B. F. Wright, the President of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Toledo and Vicinity, gave the benediction.

Letter from MLK to William Smith

Monday, July 13, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, Albany, GA, St. Augustine, FL

Dr. King thanks Dr. Smith for his contribution of $50 to the SCLC. He updates him on how much money was raised at a recent reception and details how it will be used. Dr. King also sends a copy of his latest book as an expression of appreciation.

Letter from Mary Whiteside to MLK

Monday, May 7, 1962
Washington (WA)

Ms. Whiteside, treasurer of the Democratic Club of Paseo, Washington, encloses a check to help Dr. King with "organizing and tutoring." The club decided to send the funds after reading a letter one of its members received from Dr. King.