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"Atlanta, GA"

Metaphysics

Dr. King notes an insight from American psychologist and philosopher William James regarding metaphysics.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Virginia (VA), Michigan (MI), Alabama (AL), New Hampshire (NH)

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Letter from Mrs. Gossett to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Kansas (KS), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Gossett responds to Dr. King's "Showdown for Non-Violence," an article in Look magazine. She compares welfare and social security to subsidies received by the agricultural, railroad and mining industries. She also encloses an editorial from her local paper that mentions Dr. King.

Pledge for Peace Campaign

California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Karno and Mr. Saunders request assistance for their Pledge for Peace campaign. This campaign specifically targets the economy through the automotive industry. "I hereby pledge not to buy a new car until there is peace in Vietnam".

Telegram from MLK to Nicholas Biddle

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King apologizes to Nicholas Biddle for being unable to attend the testimonial for Senator Jacob Javits.

Letter from Richard B. Specht to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Richard B. Specht requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the importance of Latin for modern day students.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Scholasticism"

This note card reflects notes taken by Dr.King on the concept of "Scholasticism". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Chilean Citizens

CHILE

Dr. King thanks Rodolfo Molina and Arturo Venegas for their contribution and support to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from John R. Brescia to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

John R. Brescia requests to be sent campaign materials and a schedule of Dr. King's speaking engagements.

Power of Attorney

Wednesday, November 29, 1961
Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA), Illinois (IL)

This document appoints Chauncey Eskridge as agent and attorney for Rev. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr. in Philadelphia.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Agenda for the Leadership Conference Executive Committee Meeting

Arnold Aronson sends the agenda for an upcoming meeting for the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference. Important topics of discussion include the Civil Rights Act of 1967 and the Freedom Budget.

Letter from C.G. Gomillion to Dr. Randolph Blackwell

Wednesday, August 18, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Tuskegee, AL, Selma, AL

C.G. Gomillion writes Dr. Randolph Blackwell requesting reimbursement for paying the bail to release SCLC driver Walter Franklin. Franklin was arrested and released in Tuskegee, but was arrested again in Selma because the SCLC failed to pay his fine.

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), Atlantic City, NJ

In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

MLK Note Card - "Paint"

In this note card, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on "...shin[ing] only for the life of imitative mediocrity."

Letter from Robert L. Tucker Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967
New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Robert Tucker inquires about Dr. King's views on Adam Clayton Powell and his position in Washington. Tucker states that he has great respect for Dr. King, which is why he wants clarity on his sentiments regarding the Powell controversy.

Telegram from C. C. Shell to MLK

Georgia (GA)

C. C. Shells writes Dr. King suggesting that segregationist Lester Maddox run for President of the United State with Dr. King as Vice President.

Telegram from Patricia E. Smith to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Patricia E. Smith writes Dr. King to congratulate him "on dignity maintained and balanced general gently Christian position."

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

Friday, December 3, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Wednesday, October 17, 1962
Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

Oklahoma (OK)

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), DENMARK

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Revelation Baptist Church Program for "A Knock at Midnight"

Sunday, September 27, 1964
Cincinnati, OH, Birmingham, AL

This program outlines the Revelation Baptist Church Sunday Worship Service on September 27, 1964. The booklet lists Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth, co-founder of the SCLC, as the church's presiding minister. On this occasion, Dr. King addressed the congregation from the pulpit with the sermon "A Knock at Midnight," which had been published the year before. Dr. King's handwritten notes seem to outline another talk on the back cover.

MLK's Reply to an Invitation

Thursday, December 21, 1967
CANADA

Dr. King regrets to inform Robin Skuce of his inability to accept her invitation to speak at a seminar for a Canadian high school under the auspice of the United Nations Association in Canada. Dr. King informs Miss Skuce that he must decline her offer due to preparation of several SCLC programs scheduled for the following year.

The Future of Integration

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.