Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"Atlantic City, NJ"

Letter from Mrs. Bill Green to MLK

Monday, May 27, 1963

Mrs. Bill Green, an uneducated white woman, informs Dr. King on the spiriutal words she has recieved from God. Mrs. Green asserts that she recieved this insight after she envisioned the struggle Dr. king has endured. She lists four ideas surrounding the lack of collectivity amongst the races and the acknowledgment of the power of prayer.

Correspondence - Mrs. King from The Alumni Association of Antioch College/ Alumni Fund 4/26/60

Tuesday, April 26, 1960

This 1960 fundraising letter is from the Alumni Association of Mrs. King's alma mater, Antioch College. The fundraising committee for the Alumni Association sent this appeal to Mrs. King as a request for her continued support.

Letter from MLK to Irene Shunfenthal

Dr. King thanks Irene Shunfenthal for her support. He says that those who seek peace through nonviolence must use every creative means of protest available to achieve U.S. disengagement from Vietnam, and must also urge that nonviolence be adopted internationally to settle disputes among nations.

Letter from Rev. C. J. Bell to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Rev. C. J. Bell, the Editor in Chief of the Alexandria News Leader and pastor of the Progressive Baptist Church, wrote this letter to Dr. Ralph David Abernathy expressing his support following Dr. King's assassination. Abernathy was named Dr. King's successor as president of the SCLC and Bell wishes to offer his help if he can be of service.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Fichte on God

Dr. King references Kantian protege Johann Gottlieb Fichte and philosophically defines God as the "moral order of the universe."

Letter Judith Van Swaringen to MLK

Tuesday, December 8, 1964

Judith Van Swaringen, a senior at Surrattaville High School in Clinton, Maryland, writes to Dr. King requesting information for her report dealing with the Reverend's steps leading to the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from President Johnson to Alan Westin

Monday, February 28, 1966

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Professor Alan Westin, of Columbia University, to congratulate him on the formation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

This document is a royalty statement from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. for his text "Stride Toward Freedom". June 14, 1967

Fundraising Letter from MLK Addressed to Friends

Dr. King writes this letter on behalf of the Workers Defense League, requesting funds to assist six South African youth who seek political protection in the U.S.

Letter from MLK to Bishop Randolph Clairborne

Monday, March 15, 1965

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Bishop Randolph Clairborne for his contribution to a dinner held in King's honor. The City of Atlanta sponsored a dinner for Dr. King in honor of his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

Descartes

Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Man: Origin, Limitations and Freedom

Dr. King quotes Bible passages that explore the value of man, the limitations of man, the relationship between soul and body, and the origin of man.

Congratulatory Letter from YWCA to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

The YWCA congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Committee to Adopt a Freedom Rider

Saturday, August 5, 1961

This is a brochure to an event entitled the Card Party. This event is catered to raising funds to adopt a freedom rider.

Cover to Cover

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Trentonian newspaper, under the subheading "Cover to Cover," published a brief review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community." This review examines Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" was Dr. King's first publication, since he received the Nobel Peace Prize. The book was published and released in 1967.

Letter from Rev. Sandy F. Ray to MLK

Friday, July 15, 1966

Rev. Sandy Ray (Uncle Sandy), of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York, expresses deep appreciation to Dr. King for his sermon "Guidelines for a Constructive Church," delivered at the dedication of their new Center.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Don Edwards to MLK

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Representative Don Edwards of California sends his gratitude to Dr. King for a recent letter. Edwards informs Dr. King that they are currently drafting legislation to amend the Civil Rights Act.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

Marx

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Telegram from N. K. Steele to MLK

N. K. Steele, on behalf of Bethel Baptist Church, offers prayers to Dr. King during his stay in the Care County Jail in Americus, Georgia.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson To Mrs. Arthur Stengel

Monday, June 29, 1964

Lady Bird Johnson writes Mrs. Arthur Stengel expressing amazement at her likeness of the President. Sally Stengel was a sculptress whose likeness of Eleanor Roosevelt is permanently placed at the White House. Joseph Mermel contracted Dr. King to inquire whether he wished a similar bust of himself.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Advance

Monday, December 19, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses advance payment from Harper & Row for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here."

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Letter from the American Embassy in New Delhi, India to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965

The Embassy of the United States invites Dr. King to come and visit India for at least a month. He can lecture in his special areas of interests. The embassy states that the best time to come is between November and April.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

Transcendentalism

Dr. King provides background information on Ralph Waldo Emerson's theory of transcendentalism.