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MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964
New York (NY)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

"A Constructive Use of the Sense of Shame" is the title of this sermon outline, prepared by Dr. King. The parable of the 'Prodigal Son' is the chosen text for the sermon.

Letter from David Joel to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

In this letter, Joel writes Dr. King requesting assistance with a term paper on "Black Power". Joel is a sophomore at Briarcliff High School and is writing a term paper for his World History course. He hopes that King can offer a more clear explanation of the "Negro situation" and he also includes specific questions for King to answer.

God

Dr. King quotes Dr. William Temple, stating that "God minus the world equals God; the world minus God equals nothing."

Dexter Echo: April 6, 1960

Wednesday, April 6, 1960
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This edition of The Dexter Echo addressed to Dr.

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Washington, D.C., New York, NY

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Don Dickson to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
Atlanta, GA, NEW ZEALAND

A representative of the New Zealand Baptist Theological College invites Dr. King to write an article for their 1965 college magazine.

Letter from Senator Charles Percy to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that the Senate Housing and Urban Affairs Subcommittee is proceeding to report a bill to the Senate that could become the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1967. The bill would assist lower income families and shrink the gap between white and black America, while expanding the economic opportunities for all.

Condolences to the Wife of Theodore Trammell

Tuesday, March 20, 1962
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker send condolences to Mrs. Theodore Trammell. They make a promise to rededicate themselves to the fight for human rights, just as her husband had done.

The Dilemma of White America

Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

Friday, November 22, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

The Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Washington, D.C.

This photograph encourages individuals to join the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom to Washington, D.C in an attempt to arouse the conscience of the nation.

Suffering

Dr. King writes that the view of suffering in Job 20 is fallacious.

Letter from Joan Daves to Harry H. Wachtel

Friday, November 6, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves sends Mr. Watchel a copy of a proposed Memorandum of Agreement for the distribution of hand lettered copies of Martin Luther King's speech I Have A Dream.

An Edition of the SCLC Newsletter

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

This April/May 1964 SCLC newsletter highlights the recent accomplishments of the SCLC and its members. Some of the topics discussed are the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Ben Hooks' recent judicial appointment, and Dr. King being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Clement Alexandre to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Clement Alexandre sent Dr. King this get well letter following his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Letter from Clifford P. Case to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL)

Senator Clifford P. Case, U. S. Senator from New Jersey, writes Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Act being passed. Case encloses a copy of the bill as it passed, with an explanation of "the major changes from the House version."

Letter from John Barber to Mrs. A.W. Boone

Monday, November 8, 1965
Atlanta, GA, BELGIUM

John Barber, Executive Assistant to Dr. King, thanks Mrs. Boone of Atlanta's Booker T. Washington High School for agreeing to find a "Negro youngster" to become the pen pal of "a young French correspondent." The pen pal request resulted from communication between Dr. King and Dominique Pire, a Nobel Peace Prize recipient and Belgian priest.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays regarding Contribution to Morehouse College

Monday, October 1, 1962
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Dr. King pledges a donation in the amount of $225 to Morehouse College President, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, for dormitory renovations.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This letter addressed to Dr. King criticizes his beliefs in equality and justice. The anonymous author states that "we are living under devil law" and "justice belongs only to the devil." He or she continues, arguing that schools corrupt children, filling their brains with "devil wisdom and devil justice and devil love."

Letter from Sevy Powell to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

evy Powell expresses her view that President Johnson has done more for Negroes than President Kennedy did and Robert Kennedy or Sen. Eugene McCarthy can do because of his ability to influence Congress.

Letter from Marshall C. Dendy to the SCLC

Monday, October 23, 1967
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

In this document dated 10/23/1967, Marshall C. Dandy writes to Dr. King and the rest of the SCLC, enclosed is a check from "A Fellowship of Concern".

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 22, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Illinois (IL)

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Letter from Phyllis E. Ames to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Phyllis E. Ames, on behalf of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Young Adults of the New York Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Faith

Dr. King quotes William James' "The Sentiment of Rationality."

Statement by MLK Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Atlanta, GA

After being notified of receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King released this statement to the public.He refers to the award not as an honor but as a "tribute to the discipline."

Letter from Bengt Bjerke to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden

Bengt Bjerke from the Legal Counsel of the Nobel Foundation informs Dora McDonald that a signature is needed for Dr. King's copyright assignment form for his Nobel Lecture.