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"BELIZE"

Letter from Hosea Williams to Attorney Solomon Seay, Jr.

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Montgomery, AL

Reverend Williams writes to Attorney Seay requesting advance notice, of three to four weeks, for persons appearing in court. He also states that it would be helpful if he would give the dates of the arrests and the charges.

The Secular in Relation to the Holy

Dr. King quotes theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology." Dr. King's doctoral degree is in systematic theology from Boston University and his dissertation is on Paul Tillich. According to Tillich, secular and holy correlate and cannot act separately. Tillich states, "The holy embraces itself and the secular."

Letter of Gratitude from MLK to Mrs. Erber

This letter of gratitude was written to Mrs. Erber from Dr. King. In this letter Dr. King thanks Mrs. Erber for forwarding the newspaper clippings about her daughter Elena. Little Elena is a supporter against the injustices of racism. Dr. King thanks her for raising such an admirable daughter.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
VIETNAM

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King sketches notes on "the most original thinker in Danish history."

Letter from Mrs. Julia D. Fields to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Florida (FL)

Julia Fields is the only Negro stockbroker in Florida and discusses the adversities she has experienced with Dr. King. Mrs. Fields describes this time period as the "worst year of her life" because the whites resent any Negro attempting to move in their neighborhood. Dr. King is addressed to possibly give advice to better her situation and uplift her "let down" spirit.

Postcard from Ann Flynn to SCLC

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
New York, NY, San Francisco, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Ann Flynn writes the SCLC requesting the full text of a speech made by Dr. King at an event sponsored by Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from Lorraine Small to MLK

Wednesday, November 17, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Lorraine Small, a student at Margaret Washington High School, writes Dr. King and the SCLC requesting information on the organizational structure of the SCLC, as well as its leaders, goals, and purpose.

Letter from Rev. John Bartos to MLK Regarding "Strength to Love"

Monday, March 1, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Rev. John Bartos referenced Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in his sermon to the First Baptist Church congregation. Rev. Bartos focused on the chapter "Being a Good Neighbor," in which Dr. King discusses a story of a car accident and the discriminatory triage process that contributed to the occupants' deaths. The sermon produced questions and reactions the writer is hoping Dr. King can address.

Letter From MLK to Mr. Berkowitz

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding demonstrations in Montgomery.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Connecticut (CT)

The Women's Strike For Peace organizes a demonstration in Washington, D.C. to bring awareness to the opposition to the Vietnam War. This letter is particular dedicated to the means and cost of transportation to Washington, D.C.

Letter from MLK to Society of Brothers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King thanks the Society of Brothers for its recent donation to the SCLC and explains why the donation is important to the work and needs of the SCLC.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, North Carolina (NC), Massachusetts (MA), JAPAN, SOUTH KOREA, HONG KONG, TAIWAN, PHILIPPINES, MEXICO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, TANZANIA, GUATEMALA, PERU, CHILE, BOLIVIA, PLURINATIONAL STATE OF, COLOMBIA, KENYA, EL SALVADOR, BRAZIL, VENEZUELA, New Orleans, LA, Nashville, TN, Maryland (MD), Florida (FL), Colorado (CO), Montana (MT), GERMANY

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Congratulations from Darien Public Schools Superintendent to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Mr. Coffin congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Coffin also provides Dr. King with information on the initiatives of the Darien Public Schools to further progress the civil rights movement.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Letter from Joe Martine to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
Indiana (IN), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Martine shares with Dr. King strong feelings of opposition to the government drafting men for the war in Vietnam. He also comments on statements made by Eartha Kitt at a White House dinner hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, addressing the correlation between juvenile delinquency, crime, and war.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Letter from Darlene Wentz to MLK

Wednesday, March 14, 1962
North Dakota (ND), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Darlene Wentz, a Senior at Streeter High School, request pamphlets on the social and economic conditions of African Americans.

Letter from Herbert G. Cave to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Director Dr. Herbert G. Cave represents the Department of Anesthesiology at the Harlem Hospital Center in congratulating Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Seven years earlier, in 1958, Dr. King had been a surgical patient of the hospital due to being stabbed with a letter opener while on a book tour.

Telegram from Senator Phil Hart to MLK

Friday, June 21, 1963
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

Senator Phil Hart of Michigan sends this telegram to Dr. King expressing his optimism about the eradication of segregation in America.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1964

Sunday, March 1, 1964
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Arkansas (AR), Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Iowa (IA), San Francisco, CA, Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Maryland (MD), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Brooklyn, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Kentucky (KY), Florida (FL), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Albany, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The March, 1964 SCLC newsletter reports many news items, including a voter registration drive in Alabama, the results of several legal cases, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an article criticizing Judge Durwood T. Pye and the use of interracial primers in Detroit's public schools.

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
New York (NY)

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, New York (NY), New York, NY, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, JAPAN, SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to John L. Tilley

Tuesday, January 6, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is requesting the use of Morehouse College for a three-day conference of southern leaders. The conference will be sponsored by the SCLC and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. Target issues include nonviolence and social action.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Sunday, August 6, 1967
California (CA)

William Kivi forwards Dr. King a copy of a postcard addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The correspondence alleges that the riots occuring in urban cities are a result of a economic stronghold to keep, in Kivi's view, "oppressing the oppressed." Kivi uses an example of California Governor Ronald Reagan's proposal to nix any federal program that supplements the War on Poverty.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer questions Dr. King about blacks committing brutal acts against whites.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Telegram from Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne to James Meredith and MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne salute James Meredith and Dr. King for their service and dedication to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Donna Mitchell to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL

Donna Mitchell, an African American youth from Detroit, writes Dr. King to extend her support and express her appreciation for what he and others are doing in Birmingham, Alabama.