Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"BELIZE"

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

Letter from Vivian Cintron to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vivian Cintron, who is a student, offers her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Dr. King-Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brown's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from FLING Unifie to MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

Mauricio Gregorio Okatha describes to Dr. King the harsh conditions and struggles of the people in Portuguese, Guinea in their fight for freedom. Mr. Okatha requests the SCLC’s assistance in sending medication and clothing for their soldiers, who are wounded and fighting in rags.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Hicks to MLK

Mary Hicks sends a monetary donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was sent after Mr. Hicks consulted with author Mrs. Boyle about where a donation could be used.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Friday, August 23, 1963

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter from MLK to Elodia Trevino

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King thanks Elodia Trevino for her support of the Freedom Movement and calls her letter a "contribution to the morale and spirit" of the movement.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Wednesday, October 17, 1962

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

Luther

Dr. King references the political philosophy Martin Luther and quotes, "I will side always with him, however unjust, who endures rebellion and against him who rebels, however unjust."

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

Letter from Martin J. McNamara to MLK

Monday, August 7, 1967

Martin McNamara, Special Counsel to the Vice President, informs Dr. King that the Vice President regrets that he is unable to accept an invitation to address the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Harold Willens to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 10, 1968

Mr. Willens forwards a telegram to Dora McDonald that he had previously sent to Andrew Young. Willens invited Ralph D. Abernathy to be a guest on "Issues and Answers." Abernathy initially declined the invitation only later to accept, which lead Willens to inform him of the potential "impact and consequences."

Schleiermacher (The Church)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

Letter from MLK to Ann Patricia Herring

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King congratulates Ann Herring on her new marriage and apologizes for misfiling her earlier letters asking him to perform her marriage ceremony. He assures her that if he had seen her letters, he would have made his best attempt to perform the ceremony.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

Letter to Clark, Dodge and Company from MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Here is a letter from Dr. King to anonymous donor through Clark, Dodge and Company acknowledging the receipt of stock shares to the SCLC. Dr. King goes on to elaborate on how this contribution will directly impact the efforts of SCLC.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Operation Breadbasket of the SCLC

How to Win Jobs And Influence Businessmen; a speech given by the SCLC'S Operation Breadbasket, discusses job discrimination and the stimulation of Negro businessmen.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

Letter from Clara Urquhart to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Clara Urquhart invites Dr. King to speak at the Human Right Day Commemoration, sponsored by Amnesty International, on November 9, 1964.

Letter from Ronald F. Jockers and Ronald Schlossman to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Ronald Jockers and Ronald Schlossman write Dr. King inviting him to participate in the National Collegiate Presidential Primary Choice of 1968.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Gwen B. Geiges about Moral Support

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Mrs. Geiges to thank her for her letter expressing support of his work in the movement.

Berdyaev

Dr. King quotes a passage from Nikolai Berdyaev's "Slavery and Freedom" about religious, technological and spiritual revolutions.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Christianity

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Martin Luther's views on Christianity, accroding to the book, "Concerning Christian Liberty."