Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"BRAZIL"

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

Telegram from Thompson Bradley and Others to MLK

Sunday, February 12, 1967

The Pennsylvania Universities Council on Problems of War and Peace express their support to Dr. King.

New York Welfare Organizers to Join Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Susan Oreskes, a welfare organizer in New York City, informs Dr. King that 2000 people demonstrated as part of Dr. Spock’s peace campaign. She and Beulah Sanders, Citywide Coordinator of Welfare Groups, took 4 busses from the Upper West Side to George Wiley’s Poverty Rights Convention in Washington in August where they met with Senator Jacob Javits about a guaranteed minimum income. Mrs. Oreskes also states she wants to work with Dr. King and includes addresses for Beulah Sanders and Arnaldo Barrow of the Puerto Rican Community Project.

First Congregational Church Program

Dr. King is listed to speak at an evening church service entitled, "The Immorality of Racial Segregation."

SCLC Newsletter: April - May 1964

This second volume of the SCLC Newsletter includes a wide variety of articles on the organization's recent interests and activities. The feature article reports the success of the historic Selma to Montgomery march, and other articles touch on the SCLC's efforts to register new voters.

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Thursday, August 10, 1967

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

Draft of Prayer Given by Dr. King

This document is a handwritten draft of a prayer, given by Dr. King. The prayer thanked God for "gifts of mind with which thou hast endowed us." The date and place, in which this prayer was given, is unknown.

Letter from MLK to Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Dr. King commends the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends for pursuing an initiative to buy a home in an all white section of Hartford, Connecticut. He proudly supports the project and extends his best wishes.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activists, presents Dr. King with a proposed plan aimed at applying pressure on President Johnson and other political leaders to end the war in Vietnam. The plan includes such actions as bombarding Congress with letters, demanding that President Johnson resign, and urging Republicans to nominate a ticket with candidates in support of an anti-Vietnam war policy. If none of the suggestions are effective, Smedley encourages a push for an independent ticket.

Telegram from Margit Vinberg to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Margit Vinberg invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be the guests of honor at a luncheon in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the Joint Swedish Press Publicistklubben.

Letter From MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Friday, February 9, 1968

This response letter, dated February 9, 1968, was addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eleanor H. Allen

Monday, December 16, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Eleanor Allen regarding assisting a church affected by recent bombings. McDonald encloses the address of Reverend John Cross, Pastor of 16th Baptist Church, in Birmingham, Alabama.

Knowledge

Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence Kirkpatrick

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dora McDonald sends a biographical sketch and photograph as requested to Laurence Kirkpatrick.

Invitation from Jesse Jackson to MLK to Attend an Operation Breadbasket Workshop

Saturday, February 11, 1967

Dr. King receives an invitation from Jesse Jackson to help with a fundraising project for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Wilford Tallie to Dr. King

Friday, January 28, 1966

Wilford Tallie, a Veteran at the West Side Veteran's Hospital, expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the SCLC Chicago Campaign.

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Letter to MLK from Raymond Brown

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Raymond Brown writes to Dr. King admonishing him for his affiliations with Adam Clayton Powell and Stokely Carmichael and hopes that these associations are temporary.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Letter from Sandra Greenia to MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963

Sandra Greenia requests that Dr. King send her some information regarding integration. She emphasizes that she gained a lot by living in various integrated U.S. Naval Bases.

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

The Negro Family: A Challenge to National Action

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King addresses the topic of the Negro family. He emphasizes the importance of discussing the Negro family in comparison to other races.

Letter Regarding Politics

The author discusses political issues regrading the president and political parties. In addition, the author suggests that Black Power leaders should obtain positions within the "nut house" and the NAACP should support these appointments.

Report of the Insurgent Editor's Conference

These minutes of the "Insurgent Newspaper Editor's Conference" record the events of the conference from start to finish. The minutes also describe prominent topics of the conference, including the difficulties publishing an insurgent newspaper on a tight budget, reaching a large audience, and generating powerful content. The minutes end on a positive note: "a good time was had by all."

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Vera Jones

Thursday, December 2, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Vera Jones for her support of the Freedom Movement and the SCLC.