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"BRAZIL"

Letter to Congressman Elect Adam C. Powell

This letter from constituent Robert Greene urges Adam C. Powell to reopen his case so that he may be cleared of any wrong doing. Greene states how important Powell is to the Black community and the State of New York. Greene provides information that may assist Powell with his case.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Public School 33 Manhattan's Student Council

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

The Student Council of Public School 33 in Manhattan, NY, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King. The council pledged to practice Dr. King's principles on nonviolence and mentioned how impressed they were to see Mrs. King on television, following Dr. King's death.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

In this draft telegram, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to President Kennedy for the Executive Order outlawing discrimination in all federally assisted housing.

Letter from Arthur Abba Goldberg to Dr. King about Conducting Seminars for SCLC

Friday, January 12, 1968

Arthur Abba Goldberg, Deputy Attorney General for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs and the Housing Finance Agency is sending a copy of his resume to Dr. King, and expresses his interest in conducting seminars in the field of housing or housing finance.

Letter from Marion Barry and Edward B. King to MLK

Friday, October 28, 1960

Marion Barry and Edward B. King, Jr. extend their gratitude to Dr. King for his work, which has helped the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in its efforts.

The Meaning of Hope

Dr. King delivered this sermon while pastoring Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In spite of the existence of racial injustice in America, Dr. King maintains hope for equality, and reminds the church of their responsibility to "keep the flame of hope burning."

Letter from David C. Morton to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

David C. Morton, Campus Coordinator at Biola College, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and other campaign materials for Choice '68.

Morality

Dr. King documents a quote from British statesman John Morley regarding the morality of war. Dr. King refers to the quote, taken from Morley's publication "Recollection," as a "grand, potent monosyllable." Following the citation, Dr. King comments, "This is an agnostic talking."

Letter from MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Thursday, February 22, 1968

This is a copy of the response letter dated February 9, 1968. It is addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

MLK's Reply to Invitation to Speak at Centennial United Church

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Dr. King regrets to inform Reverend William Morris that due to his busy schedule and previous inability to work directly with the civil rights struggle, he can not accept the invitation to speak at Centennial United Church.

Letter from Sture Stiernlof to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Arbetet magazine's foreign editor, Sture Stiernlof, requests an interview with Dr. King for a "series of articles about the negro movement" that will be published in Sweden's most popular magazine, "Vi," as well as in Arbetet. Additionally, Stiernlof will use the materials for a book.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, asks Dr. King if he can access his mailing list or circulate material that Clurman provides in an effort to end the famine in India.

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

Letter from MLK to Robert Epstein

Thursday, November 15, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from Robert Epstein regarding the objective of SCLC. King states, "No man can comment adequately on his own motives... I would hope agape is the driving force in our movement." Dr. King encloses a pamphlet entitled "This is SCLC."

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Edward Taylor, an African American soldier in Vietnam, requests Dr. King's aid in a military justice matter.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Monday, November 28, 1966

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

Letter from Larry Oaks to SCLC

Monday, April 20, 1964

A student from the University of Alabama requests information from the SCLC for a course on race relations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ray Gibbons

Wednesday, December 27, 1961

Dora McDonald returns a check from Alice E. Gwinn to Dr. King because it is made out to the Council for Christian Social Action, and it needs to be endorsed before Dr. King can deposit it.

Nonviolent Leaders

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Telegram to MLK from Truman B. Douglass

Thursday, November 24, 1966

Truman B. Douglass, the chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), informs Dr. King that he has appealed to President Johnson for a meeting regarding the funding of CDGM.

Telegram from W. L. Battle to MLK

Apostle W. L. Battle offers to sponsor Dr. King in a "preaching extravaganza and conference."

Letter from Wheeler B. Glenn to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Moral and Financial Support

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Wheeler B. Glenn offer his moral and financial support to Dr. King while commenting on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Hans Spehr to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

This letter is addressed to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from the Spehr family of Germany. The couple wanted to inform Rev. Abernathy of their written correspondence to President Lyndon Johnson, drafting a plan that would lead to full employment.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Inquiring about Dr.King's Professional Tour

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Mrs.Daves has requested that Mrs.McDonald send information pertaining to Dr.King's lectures and personal appearances to her office as soon as possible.

Anabaptists

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

Letter from Amelia Jones to MLK and the SCLC

Friday, February 18, 1966

The Toldeo NAACP Branch invites Dr. King to be their keynote speaker. Amelia Jacobs Jones, representing the NAACP, requests that suggested dates regarding Dr. King's availability be forwarded to her.