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"BRAZIL"

Letter from Hanna Nazzal to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967
JORDAN

Hanna Nazzal of the Terra Sancta Tourist Company reassures Dr. King of peaceful relations in the Middle East and that his trip to Jerusalem will not be disrupted.

A Call to Vietnam Week

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

Sacrifice

Dr. King explains that Isaiah 1:11 means God can’t be appeased by sacrifice but demands righteous living.

Gregory the Great (540-604)

ITALY

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding Gregory the Great otherwise known as Pope Gregory I.

Letter from Max Goldberg to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Denver, CO

Max Goldberg asserts that the interview conducted with Dr. King a year ago serves relevance for the current progression attempts for the American Negro. Mr. Goldberg is attempting to produce copies of the interview and distribute them to various cities.

Unity

These notes, prepared by Dr. King, were for a sermon entitled "Unity." This sermon, believed to be composed during the time of 1948-1954, was never delivered.

Albany Movement Statement

Sunday, July 1, 1962
Albany, GA

This statement is written on behalf of people of faith who have come to support the Albany Movement. The ills experienced by the Negro community in Albany are rooted in racial separation, it says. The document requests a meeting with the City Commission to review their response to peaceful protest, clarification of the City’s position on an ICC ruling on segregated buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to make recommendations on desegregation.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Direction of the Movement

The author expresses her opinion about Dr. King and how he should use his "impressive" vocabulary in the right direction. She further elaborates on her perceptions of the police protection, mobs, labor needs, and more.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

Letter from Alex Miselson to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Alex Miselson suggests that Dr. King, the SCLC, and other leading civil rights group make the education of African American youth a priority.

Correspondence: Letter to Mr.Foner from Dr.King (Feb. 26, 1968)

Sunday, February 25, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King sends a contribution to Moe Foner to help in the efforts for peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Mildred Scott Olmsted to MLK

Friday, June 19, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Indiana (IN), Washington, D.C., St. Augustine, FL

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom would like Dr. King to send his greetings for their 50th Anniversary celebration.

Letter from the Chester, Pennsylvania Branch of the NAACP to MLK

Tuesday, December 4, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Chester Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The organizers ask for information about the process to arrange the visit and for a picture to be enclosed with Dr. King's reply.

Letter from Anthony Cama to Dora McDonald

Sunday, March 3, 1968
Massachusetts (MA), Virginia (VA)

Anthony Cama, a member of the Order of Sons of Italy in America, encloses American philosopher Henry David Thoreau's article on slavery.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Julius Rosenthal

Friday, December 10, 1965
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes to his supporter Rabbi Julius Rosenthal responding to concerns raised about Dr. King's connections with Congressman Adam Clayton Powell (a prominent pastor and politician). Congressman Powell was a controversial figure during that time and while Dr. King did not share all of his views, he gave him credit for advocating Civil Rights for African Americans.

Letter from Dr. King to Miss Norwell

In this doucment, Dr.King apologizes for his delayed response and expresses gratitude for the song Miss Norwell sent him.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."

Letter from Fred Warren to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968
Berkeley, CA, Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA

Fred Warren, Professor of Music at the University of California at Berkeley writes to Dr. King saddened that he will not be able to come to the University. Professor Warren encloses a brochure describing the department's program on Africa, music, and its related arts.

Totalitarianism

New York (NY)

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

MLK Schedule for November, 1960

Rhode Island (RI), New York (NY), GHANA, NIGERIA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., London, England

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements for November, 1960.

Request for a Speaker Choice '68

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Lonnie Longmire, representative of Baylor Universtiy, request that Dr. King suggest speakers that support his presidential candidacy for the Choice '68 project.

Comte (A Criticism by Dr. R. flint)

Dr. King quotes a statement from Robert Flint's "Philosophy of History in France and Germany" which criticizes French philosopher, August Comte. Robert Flint was a Scottish philosopher.

State of New York Civil Rights Bureau - 1967 Annual Report

New York (NY)

This is the overview of the advancements and achievements affiliated with the New York Civil Rights Bureau, in 1967.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967
Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Letter from Jeanette Harris to MLK

Sunday, February 23, 1964
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Ohio (OH)

Jeannette Harris writes Dr. King, enclosing her resume in hopes of being employed by the Gandhi Society in San Francisco.

Letter from Prins Gunasekara to MLK

Sunday, December 5, 1965

A member of the Ceylon, Colombo Parliament sends Dr. King two books for inspiration. He encourages Dr. King to continue in the struggle for freedom and hopes that reading the books will renew Dr. King's commitment.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, April 24, 1964
New York, NY, GERMANY

This letter serves to inform Dr.King of the German publishing house's request for a personalized forward for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."