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Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Newspaper Article about Refresher Training and Employment for Teachers Displaced by Integration

This newspaper article frames the dilemma of teachers displaced by integration. Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz urged state employment agencies to make a maximum effort to provide employment assistance and refresher training opportunities for these teachers.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 21, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes about plans for a reception and press conference in Bonn, Germany. Ms. Daves mentions that Dr. King may be asked to deliver an address.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Cohen

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King offers his appreciation to Leslie Cohen for communicating to him an "honor bestowed... ...by each of Miss Egnal's eighth grade class."

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Letter from Juanita Turner to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966

35 year-old Juanita Turner writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help in her time of crisis. She has lived in Chicago for 12 years and suffers from epilepsy. She needs help finding a trustworthy attorney, a dependable doctor, and basic necessities.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson he will not be able to speak at the upcoming conference in Portland, Ontario due to commitments for the Civil Rights Movement in the US and his pastoral duties for Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Professor St. Clair Drake to MLK Regarding the Economic State of Negro People

In this letter, Standford University Professor of Sociology, St. Clair Drake, discusses his interest in launching a co-operative movement to aid the Negro people. Professor St. Clair Drake also mentions an enclosed newspaper.

Get Well Letter from William H. Allen, M.D.

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

William H. Allen, M.D. sent this letter to Dr. King expressing sympathy to Dr. King, for his nearly fatal stabbing. Dr. Allen, further into the letter, encouraged Dr. King to continue to pray in order to eliminate evil in the world and hoped he will remain protected to continue his mission for freedom.

Letter from Sy Sadinoff to MLK

Thursday, May 14, 1964

After speaking to Jackie Robinson and asking him how Beacon Looms, Inc. can best help the movement for Negro equality, Sy Sadinoff writes to Dr. King enclosing a $100 donation for the Mount Olive Building Fund.

Letter from Rev. A. A. Ackerman to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1962

Reverend A. A. Ackerman, Pastor of Bethel AME Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can make an appearance and speak at his church.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Letter from Mrs. E. A. Johnson to Mrs. Cotton

Saturday, March 31, 1962

A young male civil rights activist and participant in demonstrations experienced police brutality after he was targeted for his involvement in the Monroe Race Riot story. E. A. Johnson provides Mrs. Cotton with the legal details of the case surrounding the young man.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Miss Enid Baird

Dora McDonald sends word via telegram to Enid C. Baird informing her of an unforeseen emergency that prevents her attendance at the Urban League Convention.

Letter from Ralph Turnidge to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

The Reverend Ralph Turnidge, General Secretary of the Washington-Northern Idaho Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to be the featured leader at a conference on the Church and Human Rights.

MLK Request from Princeton Committee for Negotiation Now

Friday, November 10, 1967

Mary Temple of the Princeton Committee for Negotiation, invites Dr. King to make an appearance at a fundraising event.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Letter to Mrs. King from Lillian Tynec

Saturday, October 10, 1959

Lillian Tynec writes Mrs. King to request the travel details related to a Women's Day program.

Letter from David Morgan to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

David Morgan writes this letter of condolence to Coretta Scott King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Morris Kight to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, November 16, 1967

This document is a letter from Morris Kight to Dr. King in which Kight expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's efforts and offers his assistance in mobilizing individuals for the planned March on Washington February 1968.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.

Science

Dr. King's notecard addresses the analytical method of science. King interprets Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" to mean "[t]he method of science is to diversify or break up this experience into its component elements." He quotes Whitehead coining the term 'diversification of nature.'

Philosophy Reading List

This document serves as the reading list of various philosophers. Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and more are apart of Dr. King's philosophical reading from October through January.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

Letter from Ms. Dora Byron of Emory University to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

In this letter, Ms. Byron of Emory University's Community Educational Service requests for Dr. King to appear on a new campus public service television program entitled "Profile."

Walter Winchell: Man Doing A Column

In part of this edition of his syndicated gossip column, Walter Winchell briefly criticizes SNCC in the irreverent style for which he was known.

Third Level (Cont.)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”