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Letter from Robert G. Lippmann to MLK

Saturday, November 16, 1963

Robert G. Lippmann requests a copy of the sermon Dr. King delivered at the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church for the funeral services of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Diane Wesley.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Progress"

Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints pertaining to "Progress" while making reference to a Herbert Spencer.

Letter from MLK to Berl Bernhard

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King writes Berl Bernhard, Staff Director of the Commission on Civil Rights, to introduce him to Mrs. Walter Lee Mengledorff. Mrs. Mengledorff is a resident of Savannah, Georgia, and "has concrete evidence on voting irregularities in Chatham County, Georgia. She is interested in bringing the whole matter to the attention of the Commission on Civil Rights.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Letter from Juan Mari Bras to MLK

Sunday, February 19, 1967

Juan Mari Bras, Secretary-General of the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, writes Dr. King about Puerto Rican opposition to the Vietnam War. Bras informs Dr. King that his group will be at the April 15th Mobilization Committee Against the War in Vietnam rally outside of the United Nations. Bras hopes to communicate with Dr. King face to face and exchange ideas.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King addresses the United Neighborhood Houses of New York at the Biltmore Hotel. He focuses on the need to alter the ineffective, piecemeal manner in which the government tries to fight poverty by fighting its symptoms, and instead suggest that the government channel those funds into a new "guaranteed annual income" that will help turn non-producers into consumers. This rough draft of the speech contains Dr. King's handwritten revisions and additions.

People in Action: Most Abused Man in Nation

Saturday, March 31, 1962

This article by Dr. King, published in his "People in Action" series in the New York Amsterdam News, describes the national and local reaction to the Birmingham jailing of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and J. S. Phifer.

MLK Endorses Septima Clark's Autobiography

Monday, July 2, 1962

King writes this endorsement of Septima Clark's autobiography"Echo In My Soul," which captured her struggle as a Negro woman in the South. Clark was a prominent civil rights activist considered to be the "Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement."

Marvin Wachman Invites MLK to Speak at Lincoln University

Friday, August 16, 1963

Marvin Wachman, President of Lincoln University, invites Dr. King to a speaking engagement.

Program: The Call To Worship

Sunday, July 11, 1965

This program outlines the order of service at Friendship Baptist Church in Pasadena, California. Dr. King is highlighted as the guest speaker at the Sunday morning service.

Letter from Mrs. Mildred Yacks to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Mildred Yacks writes Dr. King, complimenting him on his character but shares her belief that King's efforts are useless unless he redirects the youth.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Handwritten Notes on Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sin. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Letter from MLK to Oklahomans for Negotiation Now

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Oklahoma City extended by Margaret Novitski of Oklahomans for Negotiation Now.

Letter from E. Cowles Andrus to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

Mrs. Cowles Andrus commends Dr. King a speech made in Washington. Having donated in the past, Mrs. Cowley Andrus was so impressed and inspired by the speech that she increased her contribution with hope it would be of great benefit.

Problems of Esthetics

Dr. King writes class notes from his Problems of Esthetics course at the University of Pennsylvania around 1950-1951. He enrolled in the above class while attending Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Sanford Kahn to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966

Sanford Kahn requests Dr. King's support for an effort to abolish the death penalty at the federal level. If given Dr. King's support, Kahn proposes listing the SCLC as a participating member of the ad hoc committee. If the SCLC cannot be listed, Kahn suggests Dr. King serve as an advisor.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable J. Caleb Boggs

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator James Caleb Boggs of Delaware to commend his role in "forging the bi-partisan unity" that made possible the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Letter from Edward F. Bell to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Attorney Edward Bell offers his legal services to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mary Doggette to the SCLC

Monday, March 15, 1965

Mary Doggette encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC that was collected from several Riverside Health Center employees in New York City.

American Labor Problems

In an assessment of American labor,Dr. King poses the question, "are we as concerned for human values and human resources as we are for material and mechanical values?" Furthermore, he declares the necessity of legislative, political, and social action to rectify such failings of American society.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Letter to the Editor regarding Harris Wofford

This letter to the editor comes to the defense of Harris Wofford, civil rights advisor to President Kennedy, who was inaccurately described in print.

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

Thursday, January 25, 1968

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

Go to Black Africa

An unknown author writes to Dr. King advising that he return to Africa if he is unhappy with his plight in America.

Letter from Harper and Row, Inc to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

In this letter, Laura Paull, from the Religious Books Department of Harper and Row, Publishers Inc., requests Dr. King's opinion on the publication "In the End God" by John A. T. Robinson.