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"Baltimore, MD"

Calvin Kytle to Head Information Center for Urban America

This press release revelas that Calvin Kytle will head a new national information center for Urban American, Inc.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Telegram from Charles Hayes to to MLK

Charles Hayes, an official of the AFL-CIO, sends Dr. King best wishes for a "speedy recovery." He also thanks Dr. King for sending Ralph Abernathy to speak at a banquet held for the organization.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Letter from MLK to Roosevelt Zanders

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Dr. King thanks Roosevelt Zanders for his hospitality and generosity during his stay in New York. Dr. King expresses his hopes for their paths to cross in the near future and states that he will be sending Mr. Zanders an autographed copy of his book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Royalty Statement re: Why We Can't Wait

Thursday, December 31, 1964

This royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" has an itemization of royalties earned.

Questions Which Easter Answers

Dr. King writes a sermon entitled, "Questions Which Easter Answers." King asserts that while many people attend church on Easter because of its value as it relates to Christ, the true significance in Easter is in the fact that is makes one think of immortality; as symbolized in Jesus Christ.

Letter from the Mississippi Club to MLK

Monday, January 14, 1963

Officials of the Mississippi Club make a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and offer a prayer for Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Letter from Judith Brockhart to MLK Regarding a Fine Relief

Monday, October 2, 1967

In this letter Judith Brookhart appeals to Dr. King and the SCLC for aid in paying fines accrued from being arrested during civil rights marches.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons for the reception and their hospitality during Dr. King's visit to Sweden.

Letter from Detroit Resident to MLK

Monday, November 21, 1966

The Detroit resident identifies the Negro man's concept of equality as being intertwined with the sexual exploitation of white women. The author references an article that cites the disparity in numbers of illegitimate children amongst blacks and white.

Memorandum from Opal C. Jones to MLK Regarding

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Opal Jones informs Dr. King of an address change for the Neighborhood Adult Participation Project.

Letter from Cirilo McSween to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967

Cirilo McSween congratulates Dr. King for the reorganization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

Saturday, June 18, 1966

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

Letter from Joyce Armstrong to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Joyce Armstrong of Detroit, Michigan expresses concern regarding segregation and equality in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Robert Wagner

Tuesday, March 3, 1964

Dr. King sends condolences to Mayor Robert Wagner consequent to his wife's death.

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Dr. King says that there have been few strides made in school desegregation. He says that schools that comply with the desegregation laws do it at an appalling slow pace. Lastly, he says that although there needs to be more progress in both the north and the south, he has hope for the future.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbert Spencer's views on philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from John Maguire to MLK

Tuesday, October 12, 1965

Mr. John D. Maguire, on behalf of Wesleyan University's Department of Religion, writes to Dr. King inviting him to preach in their chapel.


Dr. King references Emil Brunner's argument on Christianity.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. D. Bollinger

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Bollinger an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Lincoln, Nebraska.


Dr. King quotes Aristotle's "Physics, Book II" and notes Spinoza's view of nature.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Bartley to MLK

Dr. King was sent this telegram from a couple who had recently heard him speak, prior to his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.


Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.


The folder, shown here, contained a sermon of Dr. King entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians." This address was one of Dr. King's well-known sermons.