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"Berlin, Germany"

Resolution from the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference

Monday, April 8, 1968

This resolution, adopted by the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference, condemns the brutal assassination of Dr. King.

Pantheism

Dr. King writes about an unknown author's view of pantheism.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Telegram from Harry Belafonte to Coretta Scott King

In this telegram, Mr. Belafonte sympathizes with Mrs. King as she is preparing for Dr. King's sentence of four months in prison.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

Letter from Darlene Wentz to MLK

Wednesday, March 14, 1962

Darlene Wentz, a Senior at Streeter High School, request pamphlets on the social and economic conditions of African Americans.

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Style

Dr. King references Voltaire and his views regarding the impact of the style in which one chooses to express himself.

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land

This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 15, 1964

This letter, dated October 15, 1964, was written from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald congratulating him on the Nobel Peace Prize. Daves was in negotiation to place his "I Have a Dream" speech on the National Documents Committee.

Address to the Montgomery Improvement Association

Monday, December 5, 1955

Dr. King discusses the inequality in America and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He says that he will work to eliminate discrimination in Montgomery and he encourages the audience to participate and actively seek change as well.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Langone

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Langone due to other writing commitments for the next several months, Dr. King is unable to accept his invitation to write an article for his journal, Psychiatric Opinion.

Telegram from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

A. Phillip Randolph, on behalf of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and the Negro American Labor Council, expresses joy at Dr. King's release from prison.

Operation Freedom Helps In Selma

This document provides details about three specific individuals from Selma who were fired from their jobs after their employers learned of their participation in the Civil Rights Movement. Unemployed and on the verge of disaster, Operation Freedom stepped in and provided financial aid to the three individuals, to cover the cost of food, housing, transportation and medical care.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Minutes

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

These meeting minutes of the Executive Board of the A. Philip Randolph Institute include discussions on the urgent need for legislative action on the Freedom Budget, a possible theoretical and analytical magazine on the Negro struggle for equality, and celebration of Mr. Randolph's 80th birthday.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Friday, September 8, 1961

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Letter to Miss Dora McDonald

Wednesday, February 24, 1965

This letter includes a $500 check from Mr. Sidney Emerman and a copy of two letters between the author and Emerman. Additionally, the author encloses two checks totaling $435 from Mr. Clifford Joseph who donated proceeds from Christmas cards that he designed and printed.

Letter from MLK to W. D. Mason

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in support of the Mercer County Branch of the NAACP in Farrell, Pennsylvania. He expresses his appreciation for the invitation but explains that he has accepted his maximum number of speaking engagements for the spring.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Telegram from Rev and Mrs A C L Arbouin to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Reverend and Mrs A.C.L Arbouin offer Dr. King spiritual encouragement during his time in Birmingham Jail.

SCLC Tour of Northern Cities

Dr. King announces an SCLC tour of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Washington, DC. He cites the wish to establish communication with people in the black ghettos of northern cities and to assist local leadership in taking movement issues into their communities. He mentions the moral and material support provided by northern allies for the southern struggle and a time to reciprocate.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

Letter from Archbishop Hallinan to MLK

In this letter, Archbishop Hallinan offers his words of gratitude to Dr. King, for his work, and requests a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from MLK

Dr. King thanks the supporters of the "Martin Luther King Fund" for their integral role in the effort to end poverty and discrimination.