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"Berlin, Germany"

Letter from Marshall C. Dendy to the SCLC

Monday, October 23, 1967

In this document dated 10/23/1967, Marshall C. Dandy writes to Dr. King and the rest of the SCLC, enclosed is a check from "A Fellowship of Concern".

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

L. Seyler's Report on Emil Brunner

L. Seyler from Christian Social Philosophy at Crozer Theological Seminary writes this paper on Emil Brunner, Swiss Protestant theologian. Written around February 20 - May 4, 1951, the paper contains subject matter regarding the crisis of contemporary culture.

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

Operation Breadbasket

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Operation Breadbasket outlines the results of negotiations between them and the Coca-Cola Bottling Company located in Chicago, Illinois. The negotiations brought about the opening of thirty-nine positions in the company that will be filled by Negro employees.

Letter from MLK to Catriona Cole White

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Catriona Cole White to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. He explains that their recent projects have included voter registration in the south.

Letter from Norman Baugher, Galen Ogden and W. Harold Row to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Prominent officials from the Church of the Brethren's Committee on Race Relations writes Dr. King informing him of the power of television in promoting nonviolence. Since many individuals around the nation are unfamiliar with the practices of nonviolence, Norman Baugher, Galen Oden and W. Harold Row recommend that Dr. King call upon various associates to appear on television and educate the public on the nonviolent philosophy.

Telegram from MLK to Chris Folker

Dr. King expresses enthusiasm regarding his upcoming trip to Sweden.

Letter from MLK to James Foreman

Thursday, March 14, 1963

Dr. King informs James Forman of SNCC that the SCLC will not be able to "defray the cost of the litigation" concerning Bob Zellner. He explains that a recent benefit event did not raise as much money as expected.

Letter from MLK to Catherine Haney Brock

Friday, July 30, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Brock for her generous contribution to the SCLC. King expresses his sincere gratitude and discusses how his organization uses the money received from its donors.

Statement From MLK In Response To Article Alleging Communist Ties

Thursday, July 25, 1963

This press release issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference features a Statement by Dr. King responding to allegations that he and the SCLC has communist ties. Dr. King argues that the SCLC is grounded in the Christian non-violent movement with the intent of reform, wherease communism leads to violent revolution.

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 27, 1963

H. C. Whitley invites Dr. King to the St. Giles' Lectures during Holy Week, preceding Easter of 1964. The cathedral has experienced some notable leaders and would like to continue their caliber of speakers through Dr. King's appearance.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in the Old Testament book, Amos.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King quotes Soren Kierkegaard's "Einübung im Christentum" ["Practice in Christianity"].

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Letter from Phale D. Hale to MLK

Saturday, December 7, 1963

Phale D. Hale, Pastor of Union Grove Baptist Church, sends $100.00 in support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Pastor Hale praises Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and offers to organize a massive fund-raising event in Columbus, Ohio if Dr. King will attend.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Dr. King praises Senator Kennedy's efforts toward abolishing the poll tax in state elections.

Letter from Julia Keller to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Julia Keller, a student at Geneva Kent Elementary School, requests that Dr. King change the date of a scheduled demonstration that conflicts with her class trip to Washington, D.C.

Letter From Intergroup Relations Agencies to Ivan Allen

Friday, September 9, 1966

The senders of this letter request a meeting with Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen to discuss inadequate housing, overcrowded schools, under-employment and "minimal enforcement of the city's building code." The senders represent a variety of organizations and offer their expertise in developing solutions to the problems facing Atlanta.

Newspaper Article about MLK

Saturday, August 21, 1965

In this article, Horace Sheffield responds to speculation that Dr. King will hold a "Summer Crusade" in Detroit.

Zephaniah and Knowledge

Dr. King places the biblical prophet Zephaniah historically and cites Zephaniah 3:12 and 3:17 on knowledge received from God.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. Some of the topics discussed include the role of the SCLC, Operation Breadbasket and a voting bill.

Note from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry and Julie Belafonte congratulate Dr. King on receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Harry Belafonte is an American entertainer and social activist.

Sin

Dr. King notes Niebuhr's definition of sin as the unwillingness to acknowledge the effect God has on one's existence.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

Letter from Morehouse College President to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966

Morehouse College President Dr. Benjamin E. Mays appeals to Dr. King to contribute to the school on the occasion of the college?s 100th anniversary.

Letter from the Norway-American Association to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Ragnhild Galtung, director of the Norway-American Association, congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to speak during his upcoming visit to Oslo.

Letter from Alfred Hearin to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Alfred Hearin expresses to Dr. King that he admires him and that he has faith in his ability to help mankind. He then asks Dr. King to send him a handwritten letter and a photograph of himself for his collection.

Diary in Jail

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.