Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Berlin, Germany"

Telegram from MLK to H. Rap Brown

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York, NY

In this telegram, Dr. King tells H. Rap Brown that he will undertake all measures to stop Brown being denied free movement and basic constitutional rights.

A Statement by Dr. King

Sunday, July 17, 1966
Chicago, IL

In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
New York (NY)

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Thursday, August 12, 1965
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Letter from MLK to John L. Tilley

Tuesday, January 6, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is requesting the use of Morehouse College for a three-day conference of southern leaders. The conference will be sponsored by the SCLC and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. Target issues include nonviolence and social action.

Letter with Enclosed Copy of Minutes of the SCLC Board Meeting

Wednesday, August 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Virginia (VA)

Mr. Eskridge sends a copy of the minutes for the SCLC Board Meeting to Secretary Dora McDonald. During the meeting, Andrew Young and Ralph David Abernathy address the twenty-eight board members of the organization at the Regency House in Atlanta, GA.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Lester Kendel Jackson

Monday, April 30, 1962
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN)

Dr. King writes to Dr. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church regarding Dr. Jackson's recent visit to Atlanta. Dr. King offers a heartfelt apology to Dr. Jackson for not meeting with him due to sequence of miscommunications and unavoidable events.

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Senator Robert Kennedy declines Dr. King's invitation to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's 10th Anniversary Convention in Atlanta, Georgia.

Farewell Statement by MLK

Monday, March 9, 1959
INDIA

Dr. King writes a farewell statement to the people of India thanking them for their hospitality towards him, Mrs. King and Dr. Reddick. Dr. King pleas for world peace and asserts that India should take the lead in the call for universal disarmament.

Worship

Dr. King describes the challenge of the Protestant Church as finding a balance between objective and subjective worship.

Telegram from Yamanaka TV to Pete Seeger

Monday, December 4, 1967
JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, New York (NY)

A Japanese television host writes American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger requesting that he encourage Dr. King to accept an invitation to appear on the show.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding Roosevelt Day Address on "Peace"

Friday, January 25, 1952

Here in this notecard, Dr. King provides a quote from the Roosevelt Day address concerning peace, on January 25, 1952.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Friday, November 24, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

Draft Letter from MLK to Donald DuMont

This draft by Dr. King addresses the goals and similarities of the SCLC with Christian principles. He asserts that the aims of the SCLC "...are [to] work to provide those same basic needs for all men."

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Wednesday, October 27, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King defers an invitation to speak at Lafayette College until a later date.

Letters Between MLK and Max Dean

Thursday, June 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King sends a letter out to supporters, updating them on the progress made through the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King also informs supporters that the work is far from done and asks for support. Writing on the back of Dr. King's letter, Max Dean informs Dr. King that his most important priority is an immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Vietnam. This is despite that Dean has "great respect" for Dr. King and the SCLC.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), West Virginia (WV), Birmingham, AL, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Evans

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Colorado (CO)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for Dr. Evans' contribution to the SCLC. He goes on to state the importance of the supporters contribution, so that the initiatives of the SCLC can continue to flourish.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

HUNGARY, Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 9, 1967
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), JAMAICA

In this letter, Robert L. Green, Professor at Michigan State University, requests a signature of approval from Dr. King. This signature would grant permission for Social Scientists to have involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from AJ Muste to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964
Atlanta, GA

A.J. Muste encloses a letter from Cherian Thomas to Dr. King and references a previous telegram he sent congratulating Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and The Christian Ministry

In this essay fragment from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King writes that Christianity is a value philosophy whose values are embodied in the life of Christ. He begins to spell out what those values are. The first, King states, is the value of the world as something positive and life-affirming, in contrast to the negative view of the world of the ascetics and religions of India. The second value is that of persons, who have supreme worth. People must be used as ends, never as means to ends, although there have been periods in history where Christianity has fallen short.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966
Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Fifth Grade Students Write to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Chicago, IL

Fifth Graders at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, write to Dr. King in request of literature about his style of worship.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

Memphis, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

White House Invitation to Signing of Voting Rights Act

Thursday, August 5, 1965
Washington, D.C.

This telegram from The White House invites Dr. King to the U.S. Capitol for the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Wilmer Young to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM

Wilmer Young writes Dr. King commending him for taking a stand against the Vietnam War and its connection with civil rights.