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Education Versus Religion

Dr. King records notes about the leadership of the intellectual and religious communities from Edwin E. Aubrey's "Present Theological Tendencies."

Letter from MLK to Sr. Joao Carlos Meirelles

Thursday, February 25, 1965
BRAZIL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King informs Sr. Meirelles that prior commitments regarding the Right-to-Vote Campaign in Alabama preclude his ability to attend the conference in Brazil.

Affidavit of Captain G.V. Evans

Wednesday, April 10, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

G.V. Evans, a captain in the Police Department of the City of Birmingham, confirms a series of sit-ins and marches that took place in Birmingham. The nonviolent actions, called Project C, was headed by Wyatt Tee Walker. Captain Evans believes that this conduct will result in serious injury to the police department and the demonstrators.

Letter from Congressman Ralph J. Rivers to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Alaska (AK), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Representative Rivers of Alaska informs Dr. King that he intends to sign the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.


Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 17:5 and suggests that “those of us who oppose humanism” might speak against it like Jeremiah did and provide a rational defense of theism.

Letter from Brown University Charles A. Baldwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967
Rhode Island (RI)

Charles Baldwin of Brown University asks Dr. King about his travel plans and materials needed for Dr. King's upcoming sermon at the university. He also invites Dr. King to a dinner and luncheon during his visit.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Eartha Kitt

Tuesday, December 18, 1962
California (CA)

In this letter, Dr. King is expressing his deep apprecitation to Eartha Kitt for her contribution to the Southern Chrisitan Leadership Conference.

Letter from Hano Bailey to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967

Hano Bailey praises Dr. King for asking black athletes "to sit out of the Olympics." He informs Dr. King that there are 15 teachers at his University writing letters to their relatives in support of Dr. King's campaign.

Letter from Trude B. Feldman to Mrs. King

New York, NY

In this letter Trude Feldman sends Mrs. King a copy of a "piece" on Sammy Davis from "Ebony" and asks that it be returned after review.

Letter from Byron L. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, January 14, 1967
Denver, CO, Washington, D.C.

Byron L. Johnson questions the accountability and lack of trust within the House of Representatives. Furthermore, Mr. Johnson suggest the House of Representatives create a new code of ethics, observe due process of law, and ensure the financial validity of all candidates.

Letter from R. D. Earnhardt to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Georgia (GA), Massachusetts (MA)

R.D. Earnhardt requests a meeting with Rev. Abernathy to discuss Dr. King's death and the plan to proceed with the "Poor People's March on Washington, DC.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Everett Gendler

Monday, December 2, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Virginia (VA)

Dr. King thanks Rabbi Gendler for his significant contribution to the SCLC. He asserts that the financial contributions will aid in the SCLC's political and social agendas in Danville, Virginia.

Dr. King's Strategy

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Selma, AL

In this article L. Harold DeWolf, dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, describes the strategy of Dr. King. He asserts that Dr. King follows "the way of the cross" and confronts racial hatred with "daring love."

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Monday, June 20, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary of the Hadley Executive Committee corresponds with Dora McDonald to arrange a date for Dr. King to address the committee. Shaefer provides a list of available dates from which Dr. King can select.

Letter from MLK to Shinichi Oshima

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King writes Shinichi Oshima acknowledging his letter "of recent date." King thanks him for his encouraging words and ends the letter with an inspirational tone.

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Flinsch

Friday, January 5, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter to Mrs. Margaret Flinsch, Dr. King personally thanks Flinsch for her generous contribution to SCLC and explains how her support benefits SCLC's efforts.

MLK on Student Sit-Ins

Friday, April 15, 1960
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King applauds the students participating in sit-in demonstrations and states that the leaders must develop a strategy for victory. He suggests topics for discussion including: creating an organization, a nationwide selective buying campaign, training for jail not bail, further exploration of nonviolence, and taking the freedom struggle into every community without exception. These suggestions led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

The Philosophy of Life

In "The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and the Christian Ministry," Dr. King references the abundance and reverence of a good life by noting the Biblical apostle John and the European theologian Albert Schweitzer. King notes that the minister plays an important role by providing leadership in experiencing the Kingdom on Earth.

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Vermont (VT)

Mrs. Kennedy thanks Rev. Abernathy for the SCLC annual financial report and praises its contents. She also encloses a financial contribution and money for a copy of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer blames Dr. King for riots and turmoil taking place in America.

Letter from Percival Ennis to MLK


Percival Ennis, president of the Universal Negro Improvement Association in British Honduras, asks Dr. King if he is able to visit British Honduras and speak to his organization.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publication Deadlines

Monday, January 30, 1967
JAMAICA, New York (NY)

In this letter, Joan Daves provides feedback on Dr.King's chapter on "Black Power,"and she informs Dr. King that she is waiting for chapters on "White Backlash" and "What It Means to be a Negro in America," for his book "Where do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"


Dr. King cites a quote from Reinhold Niebuhr regarding sin.

Letter from Norberto Ibarrondo to MLK

Friday, May 21, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Norberto Ibarrondo, President of Children Organization for Civil Rights, writes Dr. King expressing their desire to replace "discrimination with brotherhood." Ibarrondo informs Dr. King of a fundraiser their organization sponsored and encloses the money as a contribution. Ibarrondo also states that their school is dedicating their yearbook to President Kennedy and Dr. King.

Letter from Lou Goldstein to NAACP, February 6, 1968

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, Lou Goldstein contacts the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to inquire about the location of photographs of Dr. King, Roy Wilkins, and A. Philip Randolph.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967
New York (NY), ITALY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about her Italian associates, Santi Ando & Figli's, invitation to Italy. She also notes the publisher's request for a surplus of photographs.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.