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"Berlin, Germany"

Reuther in Praise of Poverty War Funds to Alabama Farmers Cooperative

Monday, May 15, 1967
Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL)

Walter Reuther, president of United Auto Workers, comments on the Office of Economic Opportunity's decision to give financial aid to the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association.

Saint Mary's Sends Invitation to MLK

Monday, November 28, 1966
Cambridge, MA, Atlanta, GA

This telegram sent to Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, requests that Dr. King make an appearance on March 12, 1967.

Immortality

Dr. King finds the best description of the unknowable nature of immortality in the New Testament of the Bible. It is a fragment of 1 Corinthians 2:9 regarding heaven.

Letter from David H. Staley to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Delaware (DE)

David H. Staley agrees with the SCLC's stance on the Vietnam War.

Telegram to MLK from the Dogwood Tree

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives a telegram of support from "The Dogwood Tree." The telegram conveys that "the orthodox Jewish religion is working for you. Keep your faith...."

The False God of Money

Sunday, July 19, 1953

This sermon titled "The False God of Money" was preached by Dr. King on July 19, 1953. Dr. King raised a question to his congregation stating, "Will you serve the transitory god of money which is here today and gone tomorrow or will you serve the eternal God of the universe who is the same yesterday, today and forever?"

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Suffering

Dr. King expounds upon suffering and notes that things which may not appear as defeat, may be transformed in victory.

The 105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation-Rev. C.L. Fullwood

Rev. C.L. Fullwood drafts a sermon to commemorate the "105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclimation for the Black People of America.:

Letter from C.A. Echols to MLK

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

C.A. Echols requests a copy of Dr. King's publication "The Time for Freedom Has Come" to be included in his upcoming thesis "Thoreau and Civil Disobedience."

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Thank You Letter from MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

MLK wrote this thank you note to a supporter, Mrs. C.C. White, at a time when some former supporters were worried about a lack of racial unity or SCLC's position against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Albany, GA

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Handwritten Notecard about Peace

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines J Maritain's views on Peace, from the book Christianity and Democracy.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966
Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Washington, D.C., Richmond, VA

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

SCLC Annual Financial Report

Atlanta, GA

Ralph David Abernathy, SCLC Financial Secretary and Treasurer, submitted this Annual Financial Report for the fiscal year 1963-1964. The report also includes the estimated budget for 1964-1965.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row, informs Dr. King about the enclosure of the first copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter From Jim Letherer Regarding Proposed March

Thursday, November 23, 1967

In this letter Letherer suggests a March on Christmas Eve or Easter Sunday while expressing his continued support and participation in S.N.C.C.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mrs. Epworth about an Invitation

Friday, January 12, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Here, Ms. McDonald offers a belated reply to Mrs. Epworth regarding an invitation for Dr. King and his family to dine with the Epworth family. Dr. King does not decline the invitation, but instead takes a raincheck due to an unpredictable schedule.

Letter from Robert Carr to MLK

This note from Robert Carr is attached to a copy of the "Report of President Truman's Committee on Civil Rights," sent to Dr. King as a gift.

Letter from D. McDonald to Prafulla Chandra Das

Monday, March 6, 1967
INDIA

In this response letter regarding a request for a prefatory message from Dr. King, Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's personal secretary, cites his extensive obligations in conveying regrets. It became increasingly common for Dr. King to decline such requests as his work and mission progressed.

Letter from John H. Scott to MLK

ISRAEL

John H. Scott writes Dr. King regarding his planned trip to the Holy Land. Scott expresses his admiration for Dr. King and seeks to join the tour.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Monday, September 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Telegram from Duncan Wood on behalf of the Oslo Committee, hoping to arrange interviews in Moscow with Dr. King and Father Pire.

Telegram from Arnold Aronson to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Arnold Aronson requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights endorsing the anti-poverty bill.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Illinois (IL), New Hampshire (NH)

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Walter Everett

Wednesday, August 23, 1961
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Walter Everett regarding the libel cases of Rev. Abernathy, Rev. Shuttlesworth, Rev. Lowery and Rev. Seay. He thanks Mr. Everett for his support and informs him that they are "winning the victory" with his help.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

Thursday, October 1, 1959
New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.