Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Birmingham, AL"

Naturalism (Its Losing of the Individual)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Dr. King's Notes on Ministry

Dr. King explains his perspective on the path of ministry as a career. In this brief paragraph, he notes that ministry is a very noble career but it is also difficult.

The Irish Echo: Ann Daly's Corner

Saturday, June 15, 1963
New York (NY), IRELAND, Alabama (AL), New York, NY

Ann Daly, a writer for the Irish Echo newspaper, reviews Dr. King's "Strength to Love" and recommends that her readers get a copy of it. She notes that the Irish community should be sympathetic to the plight of Negroes in Alabama because their Irish ancestors also endured oppression. She also gives her opinion on a Gaelic society publication, a book for teenage boys, and recent Irish cultural events.

Public Statement at the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Wednesday, July 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks at a rally held for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Dr. King stresses the importance of government assistance in protecting African Americans citizens from violent actions when registering and voting during elections. In areas such as Mississippi where harassment and murders took place frequently, African Americans were in dire need of a political party that was free of racism so that they could fairly be represented in a prejudice society.

Letter from Harper & Brothers to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1961
New York, NY

This letter from Harper & Brothers expresses concerns for the completion of a forthcoming book.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Creger

Tuesday, October 22, 1963
Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King's secretary responds to Mr. Creger's request to use "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" in his book. Ms. McDonald informs the author that the Letter is being expanded in an upcoming publication, therefore all requests for reprints are being denied. The Letter would eventually be published in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in 1964.

Outline Regarding Jacques Maritain

Dr. King outlines in great detail Catholic philosopher Jacques Maritain's views on: communism, democracy, politics, and the relation between church and state.

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Tuesday, October 22, 1963
SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, ZAMBIA, SOUTH AFRICA

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.

Letter From S. I. Hayakawa to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963
Georgia (GA), California (CA)

S.I. Hayakawa inquires about a previous contribution to the SCLC and asks if it is tax deductible.

Letter from Roslyn Wilkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965
California (CA)

Roslyn Wilkins of California asks Dr. King for his opinion on interracial marriage. Wilkins asserts that her mother would rather her marry a Japanese man because, as Wilkins is white, they are closer in color.

Letter from Queen N. Lewis to Coretta Scott King

Monday, April 16, 1956
Detroit, MI

Queen N. Lewis reaches out to Mrs. King to inquire about an upcoming trip to Detroit, Michigan. She mentions that she is a member of a church congregation that donated $1000 to the cause and informs Coretta that there is more she would like to discuss with her at a later date.

Card From Marjorie Baker

Marjorie Baker sends a card expressing wishes to maintain courage until things are better.

Christian Social Philosophy II

New York (NY)

An outline briefly explains T.S. Eliot's opinion on culture and how it pertains to religion, specifically Christianity. Notes taken on the side of the outline insinuate that Western culture is beginning to disintegrate because the values it was built on are decreasing in importance.

Letter from Frances S. Smith to MLK

Friday, June 5, 1964
New York, NY

Frances Smith, Promotion Director for the Christian journal "Christianity and Crisis," asks Dr. King to write a few sentences regarding the "need for continuing analysis of the civil rights movement from the Christian perspective."

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

Letter from E. L. Gayden to MLK

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
Kansas (KS), ISRAEL

E. L. Gayden writes Dr. King regarding the planning of pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Gayden offers the services of the John Brown Monument and Historical Association for the organization of the tour. He also mentions that he represents a travel agency and extends his assistance to Dr. King.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Brooklyn, NY, VIETNAM

In this letter, Joseph Clark shows appreciation for the work Dr. King has done.

Letter from Lanette J. Campbell

Saturday, March 16, 1968
New York (NY)

Lanette J. Campbell requests information regarding candidates in the Choice '68 presidential primary.

Letter from Emily Ann Fortson to MLK

Wednesday, June 29, 1966
JORDAN, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Emily Fortson, of Concreta Tours, informs Dr. King of the developing proposal related to his upcoming Holy Land Pilgrimage.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Thursday, November 17, 1966
Chicago, IL, California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

Letter from Margaret & Richard Dodge to MLK

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Margaret and Richard Dodge inform Dr. King of a successful fundraiser they hosted and enclose the profits to help Dr. King in the civil rights movement.

Congratulatory Letter from L.K. Jackson to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Dr. Johnson writes to Dr. King congratulating him on his tenth anniversary. Jackson states, "...you are the man of the Twentieth Century."

Letter from Arthur C. Walter to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Arthur Walter, Assistant Pastor at Park United Presbyterian Church, writes Dr. King regarding a boycott that will deny some African American children Christmas gifts. Walter inquires about how his church can use some of their funds to provide gifts for the children that will be affected by the boycott.

Letter from Ossie Davis to MLK Regarding Malcolm X Assassination

Friday, October 1, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter, Ossie Davis asserts to Dr. King that it is true that there is one law for whites and another for blacks. Ossie continues by expressing his feelings on Malcolm X's assassination. He closes his letter by asking for Dr. King's signature and monetary donation for an ad.

Importance of the Public Accommodations Section of the Civil Rights Bill

Atlanta, GA

This document features a story of a white civil rights worker who was fined and sentence to jail because she sought to eat with her Negro friends in a restaurant in Atlanta.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet, a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, encloses a copy of his special column including Dr. King's power quote on NBC's Meet the Press. The interview was in direct correlation to the riots that occured in many urban cities.

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

Alabama (AL), Oklahoma (OK)

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

Letter from Anne Braden to A.D. King

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Louisville, KY

Joe Mulloy will be highlighted in a set of galley proofs for a story in the February issue of The Southern Patriot. Anne Braden informs Reverend A.D. King of the induction refusal by Mr. Mulloy and how it correlates to many SCLC staff members. Mrs. Braden is sending the letter to Dr. King as well and hopes that Rev. A.D. King will participate in this action.