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"Birmingham, AL"

Judgement or Justice

Dr. King quotes a book entitled "Sea Dreams," by Alfred Lord Tennyson, regarding judgement and justice.

Hruska Says Capital...

Washington, D.C.

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Letter From Christine Heath to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Texas (TX)

Ms. Christine Heath, a high school student, asks for information on how "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, has affected Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bent Ostergaard

Wednesday, October 20, 1965
DENMARK, NETHERLANDS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Miss McDonald informs Mr. Ostergaard that Dr. King is unable to accept his recent invitation to visit Copenhagen.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA)

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Observer: The Fiery Savior

Kentucky (KY), VIETNAM

Journalist Ponchitta Pierce sends Dr. King an article that details the press conference of "The Militant." In response to questioning, the individual expresses their discontent with liberal politics, the United States of America, and its presence in Vietnam.

Letter from Autieve Smith of Revelation Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, August 25, 1964
Cincinnati, OH

Autieve Smith writes on behalf of Revelation Baptist Church to express their happiness in Dr. King's acceptance in being a part of their program with the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights Choir. Smith informs Dr. King of the time and place of his address and asks that he provide the committee with the needed information to plan his accommodations.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Louisville, KY

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN)

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Letter from H.M. Arrowsmith to MLK

AUSTRALIA, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY), New York, NY, PAPUA NEW GUINEA

General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Australia, Canon H. M. Arrowsmith, M.B.E., extends Dr. King an official invitation to visit Australia in May 1967. It is the Society's hope that Dr. King's trip will focus primarily on the role of the Bible in relation to the "stature and the status of Man" and the "question of racial equality" throughout the world.

Cooperative Production System

Thursday, November 5, 1953
New York (NY), New York, NY

G. C. Szmak provides information regarding the problems of labor management, as well as the causes and reasons for the degeneration of the wage compensation method.

Letter from Richard L. Doerschuk to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Deputy director of the United States Information Agency, Richard Doerschuk requests that Dr. King participate in a television program to be broadcast in Africa on the topic of civil rights.

Note Card on Revelation

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines the meaning of revelations. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, and bible verses.

Telegram from Phil Lenud to MLK

Sunday, December 18, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Phil Lenud sends a telegram to Dr. King expressing that Reverend Andrew Young will telegraph him.

Proposal for Chicago Schools

Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Virginia (VA)

This agenda outlines a strategic boycott of Chicago schools. The information is separated by three individual phases.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne. The first name Gordon on the note card is incorrect.

Letter from George F. Berlinger to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mrs. George Berlinger of the Nathan Hofheimer Foundation, informs Dr. King that the organization will not be including the SCLC in their budget. The Nathan Hofheimer Foundation sought to improve the living conditions of the underprivileged.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
New York, NY

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King details royalty checks disbursed from the sale of "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Letter from J. Campe to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"and "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, March 6, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter is enclosed a check and details of expenses for the Italian Edition of "Stride Toward Freedom and "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Although unable to send financial support, the author expresses "intense admiration" for Dr. King's leadership and courage.

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA)

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

Letter From Dora McDonald to Rev. Albert F. Campbell

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Secretary McDonald writes Rev. Campbell on Dr. King's behalf, informing him of that Dr. King will consider his invitation to the next Men's and Women's Day celebration.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), ISRAEL

The author of this letter asks what Dr. King is doing for his people. He or she recommends the rich Negro people in the community help the poor just as the American Jewish community helped Israel.

Royalty Statement for French Edition of The Strength to Love

Tuesday, December 6, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the French edition of Dr. King's "The Strength to Love," published by Casterman S.A. for the period October 1, 1965 to March 31, 1966.

Royalty Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

Thursday, July 25, 1963
London, England

The document shown here is a book royalty statement for Dr. King's first book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Invitation to Birthday Celebration for Haile Selassie

ETHIOPIA

This document invites Dr. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr. to a reception to celebrate the birth of the Ethiopian Emperor.

Building A New Mississippi

Mississippi (MS)

This series of photos represent a plan to help rebuild Mississippi. The photos provide a blueprint and outline for strategical efforts to eradicate poverty and voting concerns.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Sidney Williams

Wednesday, January 24, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

On behalf of the King family and the SCLC, Dr. King writes to Mr. Sidney Williams to express his appreciation for Williams' generous contribution and continuous support.

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.