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"Birmingham, AL"

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

Letter from Rev. Samuel B. McKinney to MLK Regarding Travel Arrangements to Seattle

Monday, November 6, 1961

In this letter, Rev. McKinney reviews details regarding Dr. King's itinerary for his visit to Seattle. He mentions that the community has worked exceedingly hard to gain city-wide support for his first visit to the Pacific Northwest.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Exodus

Dr. King wrote these note cards, marked "Class Notes," on Exodus. He focuses on the topics of knowledge, the doctrine of God, sin, ethics, social ethics, and the covenant.

Cloudy Summit

Sunday, January 15, 1967

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

Press Release: SCLC Add New Members

Monday, October 19, 1964

The SCLC reports about the six new members added to its executive board during the Annual Convention held in Savannah, Ga.

Letter from Jessie Tidwell to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

Jessie Tidwell writes Dr. King wishing him the best of luck and expressing interest in meeting him in person.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967

The author writes Dr. King and questions his motives for speaking so "rashly" against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Lester Kendel Jackson

Monday, April 30, 1962

Dr. King writes to Dr. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church regarding Dr. Jackson's recent visit to Atlanta. Dr. King offers a heartfelt apology to Dr. Jackson for not meeting with him due to sequence of miscommunications and unavoidable events.

Letter from MLK to Tharon Stevens

Dr. King responds to Mr. Stevens' previous letter and commends his courageous efforts for implementing the 1964 Civil Rights Act in Statesboro. An application to develop an SCLC affiliate in Statesboro is also enclosed.

Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa calls for all news media and wireless services to broadcast the release of "Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia." This call to action was prompted by racial rebellions led by Ian Smith. It was the hope of civil rights leaders to strengthen "Negro" and African relations by increasing support of peace in Africa.

Letter from MLK to Premier Lyndon Pindling

Friday, January 19, 1968

Dr. King encourages Premier Pindling of the Bahamas to accept an invitation to address the Atlanta Press Club. Dr. King assures Premier Pindling that the invitation is a great opportunity to speak with leading journalists from all over the United States.

Testament by Martin A. Watkins

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Martin Watkins covers an array of topics in his expression of poems entitled "Testament." With great admiration, Watkins presents this book of poetry to Dr. King. In the preface, Watkins explains his purpose of publishing these poems during the Korean War. He further elaborates on his admiration of the Negro, his preoccupation with death, and the identification with Christ.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

Dr. King requests a telephone conversation with Miss Kitt.

Letter from Ms. Katherine Livermore to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

Ms. Livermore criticizes Dr. King for his alleged association with the Communist Party. She also makes several historical and contextual references to slavery and the current plight of the Negro race. She concludes with a warning, "be careful this summer."

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Holiday Card from Dr. Nirmal Kumar Bose

The following document is a holiday card from Dr. Bose to Dr. and Mrs. King.

Methodist Church Statement on Vietnam Conflict

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church releases a statement regarding the conflict in Vietnam and possible outcomes and solutions. The board urges steps leading to a withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

Letter from Esther M. Jackson to McGeorge Bundy

Friday, May 19, 1967

Esther Jackson, a professor at Shaw University, writes George Bundy of the Ford Foundation expressing his dismay in the support of a segregated theatre. Jackson also expresses his disappointment in Dr. King and Roy Wilkins for not recognizing the discrimination taking place in form of cultural separatism.

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

Letter from Harry Boyte to Celia Howard Casey

Tuesday, August 13, 1963

Harry Boyte writes Celia Casey, on behalf of Dr. King, to express appreciation for her letter.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Letter from Senator Clifford P. Case to MLK Regarding Poll Taxes as a Condition to Vote

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

New Jersey Senator Clifford Case informs Dr. King that he feels strongly about the elimination of poll taxes as a condition to vote, and he will do his best to push through a provision abolishing these taxes.

U.S. Reds Fan Racist Flames To Stir Vietnam War Protest

William F. Buckley, a conservative columnist, decries the involvement of Negro leaders such as Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael n a recent Vietnam War protest. He compares Carmichael with members of the Ku Klux Klan, and he also alleges Communist involvement with the protest.

Letter from MLK to E. H. Lehman

Dr. King expresses concern regarding the illegal seating of elected representatives from Mississippi.

Letter to Melvin Arnold from MLK

Wednesday, December 26, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Dr. King informed him that he has enclosed the final draft of the sixteen sermons to be included, in his second book. He also added that he was in the process of working on the final two sermons to be published in the book.

A Letter to MLK to President Lyndon B. Johsnon

Friday, April 13, 1962

In a letter to MLK, President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the issue of Federal employment in Atlanta. Johnson informs King of the previous meeting held with the Civil Service Commission and the steps being taken to move forward.

Letter from Jeanette Harris to MLK

Sunday, February 23, 1964

Jeannette Harris writes Dr. King, enclosing her resume in hopes of being employed by the Gandhi Society in San Francisco.