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"Birmingham, AL"

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

Sunday, November 4, 1956

Dr. King shares "Paul's Letter to American Christians" with the congregation of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In this contemporary letter revised by Dr. King, Apostle Paul writes concerning the "responsibilities of Americans to live as Christians." He discusses his appreciation for America, the danger of capitalism, communism, segregation in churches, and the many denominations of Protestantism. But above all things, Apostle Paul believes that love is the most "durable power in the world."

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

The Morehouse Board of Trustees sends Dr. King a letter to accept the Committee's recommendation to elect Dr. Hugh Gloster as the next president of Morehouse College.

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Sunday, February 11, 1968

This critical 2-day strategy meeting of key SCLC staff takes place 2 months prior to the projected start of the Poor People’s Campaign in Washington, DC. Dr. King expresses concern that they have not met their target goals for participation. Debate ensues about whether to call off the campaign or push it to a later date, and also whether SCLC should abandon all of its other commitments to ensure the success of this project. Problems and solutions are discussed. Staff assignments made for recruitment of the poor, materials, organizational structure, tentative plan of action, D.C.

Sin

Dr. King writes on sin as described in Jeremiah 4:22.

John of Damascus

This notecard contains historical information regarding John of Damascus and outlines some principles of his religious philosophy.

Letter from MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Thursday, February 22, 1968

This is a copy of the response letter dated February 9, 1968. It is addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, March 4, 1968

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Letter from MLK to Rev. L. C. Henegan

Thursday, October 9, 1958

Dr. King thanks Rev. L. C. Henegan for his generous contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association.

The Great Empire During the Sojourn In Egypt

Dr. King contemplates the history of Egypt, noting that little is known about the time the Israelites spent there. At some point "Asiatic peoples," the Hyksos, invade Egypt and built a powerful empire known as the area of Syria and Palestine. Using horse and chariot technology the Hyksos conquered the land. Eventually, native rulers of Thebes in upper Egypt drove out the Hyksos.

Statement by MLK re Citizen Diplomacy

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King releases a statement that he was considering communicating by mail with the "major powers" involved in the Vietnam conflict. However; he now believes that with the changing factors of certain groups involved in the conflict, his proposed communication is no longer needed.

Letter from Joan Daves to Y. Katahira

Friday, June 26, 1964

Joan Daves writes Mr. Katahira asking for an update on an offer by Shinkyo Shuppan Sha for Dr. King's book "Strength To Love." She also asks Katahira to inform Tetsuo Kohmoto that Dr. King's current responsibilities and engagements are restricting him from writing the preface.

Letter from Dr. Alvaro Palmeira to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Dr. Palmeira, Grand Master of the Grande Orient of Brazil, offers his congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Love

Dr. King writes on the Apostle Paul’s concept of love.

Letter from Joan Daves to Howard Gotlieb

Monday, May 15, 1967

Joan Daves responds to Mr. Gotlieb regarding a request to write Dr. King's biography from archival material in the possession of Boston University. At the present time and for various reasons, Dr. King has decided not to approve this project.

Telegrams Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Participants of the Selma-Montgomery March send telegrams to defend the integrity of the march against allegations of sexual immorality.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Power"

This index card written by Dr. King references quotations pertaining to the concept of "Power".

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. B. Wilson

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Dr. King conveys gratitude to Rev. C. B. Wilson of Southern Baptist Church for a contribution to SCLC. King explains the increasing expenses of the Civil Rights Movement at a time when liberals are redirecting their attention to the peace issue.

Letter from John Due Jr. to MLK

Mr. Due writes Dr. King to offer his services as a Field Representative for the SCLC. He provides a summary of his Civil Rights background along with a list of character references.

Letter to Robert F. Kennedy from Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Senator Kennedy to inform him that his recent letter to Dr. King came in his absence. She states that the letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return to the Atlanta office.

Letter from Irene Zimmerman to MLK

Sunday, January 29, 1967

Miss Zimmerman expresses disapproval in Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

Letter from Spencer Beach to MLK

Thursday, April 14, 1966

Spencer Beach expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King and SCLC's stance on challenging "administration policy" about the Vietnam War. Even though he agrees that the Vietnam War is unjust, Beach feels that Dr. King should narrow his concerns to civil rights marches and issues within the United States.

Response Letter to Mr. Frank Abrams from Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King addressed this letter to Mr. Frank Abrams, as an expression of thanks, in response for his well wishes. As a another gesture of thanks, Dr. King indicated that he also enclosed a copy of his first book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Thomas N. Schroth to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

Thomas N. Schroth, from the Congressional Quaterly Service, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the National Press Club.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.

Letter from MLK to Gordon R. Pollard

Thursday, January 6, 1966

Dr. King expresses his embarrassment in his late response to Mr. Pollard's letter regarding a speaking engagement at the University of Victoria. Dr. King shares his gratitude for the invitation but regretfully declines due to the fact that he has accepted his maximum number of engagements for the time period.