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Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), South Africa, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Semi-Arianism

Dr. King records a definition of semi-Arianism.

Reason

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "The Finding of God."

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Letter from Juanita Turner to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966
Chicago, IL

35 year-old Juanita Turner writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help in her time of crisis. She has lived in Chicago for 12 years and suffers from epilepsy. She needs help finding a trustworthy attorney, a dependable doctor, and basic necessities.

Letter from John Madigan to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Mr. Madigan writes to Dr. King thanking him for his participation in a CBS Television program "At Random." He invites Dr. King to participate in another program entitled "Target: News."

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

President John F. Kennedy applauds the work of Dr. King and the SCLC on the occasion of the organization’s Sixth Annual Convention.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F. Newton Miller

Tuesday, February 9, 1965
New York (NY)

In Dr. King's absence, Dora McDonald writes F. Newton Miller concerning Dr. King's appearance in Rockville Centre on February 21. McDonald encloses a copy of a letter sent to Mrs. Rose R. Silvers of the Rockville Centre Commission to clarify the misunderstanding.

Letter from Louis V. Sharples to MLK

Wednesday, March 31, 1965
Albany, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY)

Rev. Louis Sharples writes Dr. King to enclose a financial contribution on behalf of the Church of St. Alban the Martyn. Rev. Sharples expresses their awareness and concern for those negatively impacted by the march in Selma and hope their contribution can offer some assistance.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Maude Ballou

Wednesday, January 23, 1957
Atlanta, GA

Coretta Scott King offers her gratitude to Maude Ballou for her sending a form for a birth certificate.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961
UNITED KINGDOM

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

Royalty Earnings Statement

Detroit, MI

This royalty statement provides a listing of earnings from two records; "The Great March to Freedom" and "The Great March on Washington."

Prayer

Dr. King records a prayer.

Letter from Mrs. Weitzler to Bayard Rustin

Friday, January 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM

Mrs. Weitzler assesses the meaning of the "March on Washington" and the impact it has had on her.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from Nippon Television Corporation

Wednesday, March 13, 1968
Tokyo, Japan

Producer Yasuo Yamanaka acknowledges Dr. King's consideration of an invitation to appear on his television program in Tokyo, Japan.

God - His Imminence

Dr. King takes notes on the immanence of God and quotes Victorian poet Alfred Tennyson's "The Higher Pantheism."

Memorandum from Dorothy Cotton to SCLC Staff

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Dorothy Cotton provides the SCLC staff with instructions for and information about the Tenth Annual Convention, including suggested procedures, details about transportation and expenses, and staff work assignments.

Full Opportunity Act Summary

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This summary outlines and provides the provisions of each section of the proposed Full Opportunity Act.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, February 19, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

SCLC Booklet

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., St. Augustine, FL, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Cleveland, OH, Memphis, TN, VIETNAM, CAMBODIA, South Carolina (SC), Tallahassee, FL

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

Letter from MLK to Jesse W. Furlow

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Louisiana (LA)

Dr. King disagrees with Mr. Furlow's theory that "we are the victims of a Catholic conspiracy."

Letter from Matthew Killian to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Alabama (AL), FRANCE

Matthew Killian shares his outrage with the unjustified suffering that violence creates. Mr. Killian continues by providing support to Dr. King in an interpretation of a scripture concerning Peter and the woman at the foot of the cross. In closing, Killian wishes blessings upon the Reverend for his efforts to complete his work.

Letter from Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Ms. Dubois writes to Dr. King regarding the strategy of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches. She believes that a change in attitude of whites, so that they desire to work with "Americans of darker complexion" should be a part of this strategy.

Letter from Klaus Schwarze to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
GERMANY, Missouri (MO)

Mr. Schwarze requests that an autograph be sent to him in Germany for his collection from Dr. King.

Notes on Literary Genre

"Every story has a plot, every story has a climax," writes Dr. King, in these handwritten notes to describe an unknown fairytale or some literary genres.

Self-World

Dr. King paraphrases Paul Tillich's view on the "self world polarity." Being a self, Dr. King writes, means being "both subject and object." This subject matter later appeared in Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Letter from James Harrison to Otis Roberts

Friday, December 22, 1967
Washington, D.C.

James Harrison, SCLC's comptroller, explains an itemized breakdown of finances related to a grant from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.