Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Boston, MA"

Brutality in Mississippi

Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL, Maryland (MD), North Carolina (NC)

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

Cloudy Summit

Sunday, January 15, 1967
New York (NY)

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Tuesday, July 27, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lamb Toledo to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. Toledo offer support to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy, A.D. King, and Wyatt Walker.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC)

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Telegram from Richard C. Gilman to Dora McDonald

Saturday, November 12, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Richard C. Gilman sends this telegram to Dora McDonald confirming Dr. King's speaking engagement at Occidental College.

Letter from Merle B. Foreman to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966
Virginia (VA)

Merle B. Foreman is writing to Dr. King in hopes of receiving an autograph. She also encloses a self addressed stamped envelope.

Funeral

Dr. King quotes Shakespeare's "Hamlet."

Letter from Eugene Jackson to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA

Eugene Jackson expresses his amazement with Dr. King's superb performance during his interview on "Meet the Press."

Statement of Mrs. Ruthie Lee Watts Regarding Death Plot on Dr. King

Selma, AL

Mrs. Watts submits a statement regarding a plot to assassinate Dr. King. She informs the FBI that a man named Jim Clark planned to kill Dr. King.

Postcard from Ollie Wilson to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Brooklyn, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Ollie Wilson expresses his opinion regarding war and evolution to Dr. King.

Letter from Manley Brudvig to MLK about an Autograph

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Wisconsin (WI)

In this letter Manley Brudvig asks Dr. King for his autograph on the enclosed Newsweek cover.

Letter from MLK to Jim Harney of Saint Gregory's Rectory

Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Maryland (MD)

Dr. King thanks Jim Harney for his letter of support. He touches on his own views of Vietnam, pointing out that the war is a symptom of a deeper problem, and those who seek peace through nonviolence must always strive to make their voices be heard.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Columbus, OH, Chicago, IL, Pittsburgh, PA

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

The Role of the Church in the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma

This handwritten draft represents the first part of Dr. King's address entitled, "The Role of the Church in Facing the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma," delivered at the Conference on Christian Faith and Human Relations in 1957. Dr. King begins his address by discussing the scientific and technological advances that have taken place in America and how this progress has influenced economic growth. He asserts that this is the nation is dealing with a "chief moral dilemma."

Declaration from the Southern Democratic Conference

Birmingham, AL

The Southern Democratic Conference writes about new laws sponsored by the Jefferson County Legislative Delegation. Under the new legislation, the writer(s) feel as though the laws were "designed to dilute the citizen strength of the Negro and to deprive the black minority of opportunities hitherto available to the white group."

February 1968, Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, writes to announce the endorsment of Reverend S. M. Sam Davis at their candidate for bishop.

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, annouces Reverend S. M. Sam Davis as their candidate for bishop. As a member of the Davis Boosters' Club, she attempts to solicit support for Reverend Davis. The Boosters' Club will feature Mrs. Lucinda Brown Pobey and Mrs. Willie Mae bell in a special financial event.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

Mississippi (MS), California (CA), New York, NY, JAMAICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, CANADA, Virginia (VA), New Jersey (NJ), Indiana (IN)

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

Friday, November 22, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

Letter From Christine Heath to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Texas (TX)

Ms. Christine Heath, a high school student, asks for information on how "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, has affected Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Sara Mitchell

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Mitchell, a representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, for her recent letter acclaiming his book "Where Do We Go From Here." Dr. King states that the lack of material on Negro History and culture in America's public schools is "appalling" and children from all races will benefit from learning about another aspect of American culture and history.

Trinitarianism

Dr. King discusses the doctrine trinitarianism, the belief that God is one being, existing in three equal persons.

Letter from Joan Daves Regarding International Travel

Tuesday, September 15, 1964
GERMANY, ITALY, London, England, Madrid, Spain, SPAIN, Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she telephoned Mr. Smeaton regarding lodging arrangements in London and Berlin.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

Atlanta, GA

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Doctrines

Dr. King records a definition of the word "doctrine."

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967
VIETNAM, CHINA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, CA

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.