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World's Fair "Stall-In"

Dr. King comments on a civil rights demonstration scheduled to be held at the World Fair. This united act is aimed to address Negro civil concerns in relation to unified housing, education, and employment.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Letter from the Baptist Union of Western Canada to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

The Baptist Union of Western Canada informs Dr. King that they have released him from any obligation to participate in the convention in Winnipeg. The union is conscious of Dr. King's great responsibilities and the difficulty he faces while attempting to make appearances.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

Society

Dr. King quotes a statement from Charles H. Cooley's "The Social Process," in which Cooley defines society as a living, unified group of processes.

This is SCLC

This is a brochure describing the functions of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Subjects discussed in this brochure include the source of SCLC'S funds, community efforts, civil rights demonstrations, and information on its leadership training and citizenship schools.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Monday, November 28, 1966

Dr. Mays presents Dr. King with a $300 honorarium for giving the first convocation address at Morehouse College.

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Letter from Archon Bowen to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968

Mr. Bowen, Chairman of the Nominating Committee for Sigma Pi Phi Kappa Boule, expresses concern to Dr. King regarding a decrease in membership due to a high mortality rate of members throughout the nation. Enclosed is a membership nomination form to be completed and returned to the Chairman.

Letter from Gulf Oil Corporation to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Craig Thompson, Director of Public Relations, informs Dr. King of Gulf Oil's discontent regarding the confusion of objectives surrounding his role as a world peacemaker. He informs Dr. King that their continued support will be provided to other respected Negro organizations "devoting their energies to the fundamental issues of the Negro's place in America."

Letter to Reverend Ralph Abernathy from Eleanore Wallace

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Mrs. Wallace writes to Rev. Abernathy in admiration of how he has carried on the work of Dr. King and wants to know how she can further contribute to the SCLC.

Letter from Stephen Holden to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967

Stephen Holden, staff editor for the American Peoples Encyclopedia, wrote this letter to Dr. King to request an article for inclusion in the publication's 1968 edition.

Letter from William A. Lawson to MLK

Friday, May 1, 1964

William A. Lawson extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to an assembly at Texas Southern University.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Abram Eisenman expresses appreciation and admiration for Dr. King's work. Eisenman also
addresses the divide of supporters within the Civil Rights Movement concerning the Vietnam War.

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

Letter Envelope from MLK, Addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber

This envelope is addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Jesus

Dr. King cites a quote from Claude J. Montefiore's book, "Some Elements of the Religious Teaching of Jesus."

MLK Mail Log: February 19

Monday, February 19, 1968

This mail log for February 19, 1968 lists incoming mail for Dr. King. Correspondences include invitations, reports, financial and article requests, contributions, offers of service, and general unread letters.

Letter from Wendell Morgan to SCLC

Monday, July 31, 1967

Wendell Morgan encloses a check to SCLC on behalf of the Howard University Campus Chest.

Ebenezer Church Bulletin and President Kennedy's Eulogy

Sunday, November 24, 1963

This is an Ebenezer Baptist Church bulletin expressing appreciation for the congregation's various acts of kindness toward one another. On the opposite side of the bulletin, an outline can be found for a memorial speech for the late President Kennedy.

Prospective Negotiation Procedure with Merchants

This draft document outlines a plan to eradicate racial discrimination during the Civil Rights Movement. It includes a detailed list of prospective negotiation procedures with merchants and a timeline for events in Birmingham, Alabama.

Negotiation Now!

Negotiation Now is a national citizens' campaign that supports new initiatives to end the Vietnam War. The campaign aligns with the Secretary General of the United Nations, U Thant, who discusses the necessary "cessation" of bombing in North Vietnam to bring about a peaceful political compromise. This flier shares the campaign's views and offers a section for donation information.

Letter from Fannie Lou Hamer to Friends

Monday, October 23, 1967

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer requests the help of 'Friends', pertaining to voting rights in Mississippi. Mrs. Hamer also details some of the sufferings of black folks in Mississippi, especially, as it pertains to potential repercussions for them registering to vote.

Letter from Jim Kelber to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Due to Dr. King's candidacy in the Choice '68 Presidential Primary College Ballot, the Chaffey College requests Dr. King to speak to the student body. Jim Kelber, campus coordinator of Choice '68, informs Dr. King of the campus location and the press coverage he would be susceptible to receive.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Telegram from MLK to Muhammad Ali

Dr. King sends a supportive telegram to Muhammad Ali. test

Letter from David S. Tillson MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr. Davis S. Tillson congratulates Dr. King on his statement regarding foreign policy.