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Letter from MLK to Joel Crittenden

Dr. King responds to Joel Crittenden's concern about white hatred toward Negroes by making two points: 1) some whites have given their lives in the freedom struggle, and 2) hatred and violence must be met with love and nonviolence.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's understanding of viewing Christ in relation to God's character.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Thursday, December 27, 1962
Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Long Distance Call List for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wednesday, September 24, 1958
Chicago, IL

Dr. King received many calls from around the country wishing him well, following his 1958 stabbing. Here is an example of a few of those long distance phone calls to Dr. King.

People In Action: The Role of the Church

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation and the role of the church in rectifying the situation.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Helen E. Saum writes Dr. King concerning the issue of drop-outs and its affect on riots and demonstrations.

Mbutta Milando Resume

This is the resume of Mbutta Milando, an Eisenhower Exchange Fellow from Tanzania.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

London, England, GHANA, New York (NY), Geneva, Switzerland, AUSTRIA, BELGIUM, CANADA, FRANCE, GERMANY, INDIA, IRELAND, ITALY, NETHERLANDS, NEW ZEALAND, NORWAY, SWEDEN, UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER YUGOSLOVIA

This pamphlet provides information regarding the history, purpose and plans for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace.

Letter from New York City Mayor to MLK

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
New York, NY, PUERTO RICO

The Mayor of New York, John V. Lindsay, invites Dr. King to a conference entitled "Puerto Ricans Confront the Problems of the Complex Urban Society: A Design for Change." Panel meetings will expound on twelve subjects ranging from "Education" to the "Administration of Justice."

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

These images are part of a pamphlet that provides an intimate look into SCLC's activities.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Letter to Congressman Elect Adam C. Powell

New York (NY)

This letter from constituent Robert Greene urges Adam C. Powell to reopen his case so that he may be cleared of any wrong doing. Greene states how important Powell is to the Black community and the State of New York. Greene provides information that may assist Powell with his case.

Letter from Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai to MLK

Saturday, August 27, 1966
New York (NY), Ohio (OH), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai writes Dr. King asking if he can read his recently published book entitled "Light Through an Eastern Window" and write a book review. His book "acquaints the people of the Western World with the thought and ways of life of the Eastern world in relation to the Bible."

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

Friday, December 3, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Letter from Baptist World Alliance to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
London, England, SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA

Baptist World Alliance Church expresses its gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to the Amsterdam Conference, and follows up with a reminder of his promise to consider an invitation from Scandinavia.

Letter from Alice Sargent to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Alice Sargent, the Assistant Director of Student Activities at Temple University, inquires what role the students can play in the Civil Rights Movement and sends a sample of one of the students' editorials.

Invitation from the United Nations to Mr. and Mrs. Popper

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY, New York, NY

The United Nations Representatives for the United States of America and Norway invite Mr. and Mrs. Popper to attend an event in honor of Dr. King.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968
New York (NY), INDIA, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C.

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Stanley Levison Suggests Use of Radio

Thursday, September 8, 1966
New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

Stanley D. Levison, New York businessman and close friend to Dr. King, suggests to increase the use of radio as a means to reach masses of American citizens in the fight for civil rights.

The Annual Men's Fellowship

New York (NY), New York, NY

This pamphlet lists the order of procedures for the Friendship Baptist Church Annual Men's fellowship.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), ITALY, CANADA

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Letter from Richard Sand to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM

In this letter, Mr. Richard Sand, of the New York Vietnam Summer, requested that Dr. King forward autographed photographs to the New York office.

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965
Washington (WA), CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Letter from Rabbi William Herskowitz to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Rabbi William Herskowitz, editor of The Jewish Horizon, asks Dr. King to read and write a review on the book, "Negro and Jew."

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962
Jackson, MS, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King informs Arline Young that he has given her information to Jack O'Dell, SCLC Acting Director of Voter Registration, and Dorothy Cotton, SCLC Citizenship School Director. One of the staff members will provide her with assistance with the cause that Dr. King says "means so much to us all."