The Archive

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"Boston, MA"

Letter from Milton S. Eisenhower to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

This letter from former President Eisenhower's brother Milton, on behalf of Planned Parenthood World Population, requests that Dr. King serve the organization in order to "lend important moral support."

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Thursday, October 14, 1965

Mr. Hayward sends Dr. King a brief note on what has been keeping him so busy and hopes that while Dr. King is in Pars, they will be able to meet.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

Why Pay for Segregation?

In this appeal to the public, the author personifies segregation and urges Negroes to stop spending money at any store that practices segregation until segregation is dead and buried.

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.


These notes highlight various conceptions of 'God' as revealed through Dr. King's scholarship.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Rev. Roland de Corneille of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter to MLK from Homer Brown

Monday, October 4, 1965

Homer Brown writes Dr. King regarding his experience with racism in the Railway Express Agency.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson he will not be able to speak at the upcoming conference in Portland, Ontario due to commitments for the Civil Rights Movement in the US and his pastoral duties for Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Stewart Udall to MLK

Secretary Udall grants permission to the SCLC to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation at the Lincoln Memorial.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from V. K. Krishna Menon to MLK

Monday, September 5, 1966

V. K. Krishna Menon informs Dr. King of the upcoming International Conference Against War Danger, which has the support of more than 70 countries. He requests that Dr. King contribute a paper about racism to the conference, and he also invites Dr. King to attend the event.

Spelman College Founders Day

Sunday, April 10, 1960

This is a program for Spelman College's Seventy-Ninth Anniversary Founders Day celebration, which featured an address by Dr. King.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, October 31, 1966

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

Letter from MLK

This is a partial letter from Dr. King in an effort to raise funds for SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Vance Hartke Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Vance Hartke's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Lessie Robinson to MLK Regarding Segregation

Mrs. Robinson informs Dr. King of the difficulty in finding a good job in segregated Graceville, FL.

Letter from Leonard L. Smalls to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

Leonard Smalls invites Dr. King to speak at the Men's Day Conference at the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Telegram to Dr. James Nabrit from MLK

Monday, July 16, 1962

In this telegram, Dr. King invites Dr. James M. Nabrit to share the privilege of being a special guest with him at the National Press Club.

Operation Breadbasket Sends Telegram Regarding Employment Discrimination

Friday, November 10, 1967

Representatives of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket address the discriminatory employment practices of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area Civil Defense Council.

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Racism in the United States

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

Letter from L. Howard Bennett to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967

L. Howard Bennett writes Dr. King and encloses statistical information regarding African American involvement in the Vietnam War.

The Nature of Hell

Citing numerous Biblical passages, the anonymous writer provides an analysis of the nature of hell and provides brief instructions on how to avoid it. The writer describes the duration of hell as "unlimited and eternal," while the physical environment is, as described in the Bible, "a lake of fire." In order to avoid hell, one must "believe and obey the gospel of Christ."

Resolution of the SCLC Board of Directors

Thursday, August 11, 1966

The SCLC Board of Directors issues a resolution at its Tenth Annual Convention that lists what it considers "flagrant injustices" which violate the rights of American workers. As part of the resolution, the SCLC requests that Congress make corrections to the National Labor Relations Act.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Celestine Fernando

Friday, May 5, 1967

Ms. McDonald grants Reverend Fernando permission to publish Dr. King's, "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

MLK on Christian Love

In this statement, Dr. King corrects "what may be a false impression." King states that while he does discuss the Christian way of love and non-violence as a tool to unify blacks in the Movement, integration is still necessary in order to truly obtain change.