Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Brooklyn, NY"

Letter from Bronx High School Student Paul Kylar to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Paul Kylar, a student from the Bronx, writes Dr. King to convey support for his plea for peace. Kylar mentions that he attended a peace parade and how elated he is to know that Dr. King works for all people and not just Negroes.

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Newspaper Article about Refresher Training and Employment for Teachers Displaced by Integration

This newspaper article frames the dilemma of teachers displaced by integration. Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz urged state employment agencies to make a maximum effort to provide employment assistance and refresher training opportunities for these teachers.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, November 28, 1962

Dr. Mays requests the help of Dr. King and several other ministers to promote theological education among Baptist parishioners.

Letter from Eulah M. Eubank to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968

In this letter, Eulah Eubank writes Dr. King regarding the Washington, D.C. Camp-In. She states she is "not...opposed" to marches and sit-ins, but feels that the Camp-In would be counter-productive. She believes it "will ad [sic] fuel to fires the extremists are trying build."

Student Permanent Record of Judith Ann Jones

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The student permanent record of Judith Ann Jones lists her academic progress while attending Chowchilla Union High School in Fresno, California in 1965.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Letter from Emma Kramer to MLK

Wednesday, July 22, 1964

The secretary of the Speakers Bureau at The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago contacts Dr. King regarding a number of new and pending speaking engagements. The two new speaking engagement requests are from Augustana College and Barat College. The list of pending engagements includes Villanova University, Duchess Community College, Barat College and the University of California, Riverside.

Emergency Rally--Walk with Dr. Spock for Peace in Vietnam

The following document is promoting a rally for peace in Vietnam. Dr. Benjamin Spock, among others, is scheduled to speak at the rally.

The Secular in Relation to the Holy

Dr. King quotes theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology." Dr. King's doctoral degree is in systematic theology from Boston University and his dissertation is on Paul Tillich. According to Tillich, secular and holy correlate and cannot act separately. Tillich states, "The holy embraces itself and the secular."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Judy Richardson

Mrs. King expresses her support for the SNCC's Negro History Primer program. She also provides Miss Richardson with her contact information so that a later meeting can be arranged.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Mary Whiteside to MLK

Monday, May 7, 1962

Ms. Whiteside, treasurer of the Democratic Club of Paseo, Washington, encloses a check to help Dr. King with "organizing and tutoring." The club decided to send the funds after reading a letter one of its members received from Dr. King.

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

Telegram from Johnnie McKinney to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Johnnie McKinney telegrams Dr. King to invite him to a fundraising event that is set to occur in Wyoming. McKinney states, "Wyoming needs you to make Reverend Reebs home state a real fortress of equality."

Retirement Speech from MLK to Dr. Benjamin E. May

Dr. King honors Dr. Mays for serving as the President of Morehouse College as he enters into retirement.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

Letter from MLK to S. P. Belcher

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King express gratitude for the receipt of financial support during an event at the Palasis des Sports. In addition, Dr. King highlights the importance of the demonstration for international concerns of the French and American communities in Paris.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Lorraine Small to MLK

Wednesday, November 17, 1965

Lorraine Small, a student at Margaret Washington High School, writes Dr. King and the SCLC requesting information on the organizational structure of the SCLC, as well as its leaders, goals, and purpose.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

Pantheism Versus Living God

Here Dr. King sketches out his views on "...the Biblical idea of the 'Living God,'" and the substitution of Christ for God "as far as piety is concerned."

Descartes

Dr. King quotes the French philosopher Rene Descartes on the concept of "doubt."

Letter from Leon Levy to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1961

Leon Levy congratulates Dr. King on his leadership and the efforts of the SCLC. Mr. Levy contributes to the organization and states that he follows Dr. King's work with interest.

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.

Letter from Water L. Hoston to SCLC

Saturday, October 28, 1967

Walter Hoston, of American Bridge Association, sends his company's contribution to the SCLC in support of their work for justice and equality.