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Telegram from Tina McDonald to MLK

Hartford, CT

Tina McDonald wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and is pleased to send God's blessings of courage and strength.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, dated October 5, 1966, J. Campe encloses royalty payments for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," "Why We Can't Wait", and "Strength to Love."

Invitation from Charles H. Day to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965
Iowa (IA)

In this letter, Charles H. Day encloses a letter that invites Dr. King to Iowa on the behalf of Reverend Edwin T. Dahlberg.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968
Chattanooga, TN, Memphis, TN, Connecticut (CT), California (CA), Nashville, TN

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Nationalism

Dr. King quotes Charles Summer, stating that being "children of a common Father" is a "more sacred bond" than being a citizen.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King to ask him to consider donating his papers to the Atlanta University Center Library as an alternative to Boston University.

Letter from Samuel Kirk to President Johnson

Friday, December 30, 1966
Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Mr. Kirk, Director of the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, writes to President Johnson expressing his desire for peace in Vietnam. Kirk suggests that Johnson appoint a Peace Commission consisting of Dr. King and others to help create solutions for ending the war.

Letter from Debbie Rubiano to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Advertisement Order Form

Atlanta, GA

This letter serves as an order form for advertisement in a booklet commemorating the SCLC's ten-year anniversary.

Background of the Speakers

Selma, AL, San Francisco, CA, New York (NY), VIETNAM

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Detroit Free Press: Dr. King Strengthens an Anti-War Coalition

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

This article, which appeared in the 'As We See It' column of the Detroit Free Press, reports Dr. King's speech in New York from April 4, 1967 on his opposition to the Vietnam War.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Friday, February 28, 1958
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

In this article, "Out of the Long Night of Segregation", Dr. King discusses the result of Negroes waiting to be treated as equals to no avail. He also presents several actions that should take place to provoke change.

Letter from Ryan & Ebert Law Firm to the SCLC about Will of Carl A. Ryan

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
Minnesota (MN)

In this letter to Dr. King and the SCLC, the Executives of the Ryan, Ryan & Ebert Law Firm reward the organization with a check for $960.00 on behalf of the last Will and Testament of Carl A. Ryan

The False God of Money

Sunday, July 19, 1953

This sermon titled "The False God of Money" was preached by Dr. King on July 19, 1953. Dr. King raised a question to his congregation stating, "Will you serve the transitory god of money which is here today and gone tomorrow or will you serve the eternal God of the universe who is the same yesterday, today and forever?"

Photograph of MLK

GERMANY

Guenther Jacobs from Germany sends Dr. King a photo for him to autograph.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Semi-Arianism

Dr. King records a definition of semi-Arianism.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966
Oklahoma (OK), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Invitation from the Negro American Labor Council to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965
Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the Negro American Labor Council, August Hill invites Dr. King to visit Racine, Wisconsin. He tells Dr. King that they are suffering from problems regarding employment in addition to all of the other inequalities. He also says that their community is not involved and that they need to be concerned about the issues in their society.

Statement on CORE Supportive Action Against Variety Chain Store Discrimination in the South

Sunday, February 12, 1961
Kentucky (KY), South Carolina (SC), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Congress of Racial Equality issues a statement regarding economic boycotts of chain stores in the North that have segregated stores in the South. These boycotts are in support of desegregation efforts in the South.

Letter from Robert H. Hamill to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Boston, MA

In this letter, Mr. Hamill offers his understanding for Dr. King's declination, regarding an unknown situation.

Letter from MLK to Daniel K. Inouye

Friday, January 24, 1964
Hawaii (HI), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King commends Hawaiian Senator Daniel K. Inouye for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Friday, August 12, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.

Handwritten notecard regarding Realism

Index card written by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Satan

Dr. King records a note on the Bok of Job, chapter 1, verses 11 and 12.

Letter from MLK to Claes Collenberg

Monday, April 25, 1966
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his sincere appreciation to Claes Collenberg of Sweden for his help in raising money to assist with the civil rights movement in America. He conveys to Mr. Collenberg that he will be notified of updates involving the Chicago Campaign on housing.

Letter of Appreciation from Ben M. Herbster to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter Ben M. Herbster offers gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of the General Synod of the United Cuhrch of Christ for a message that Dr. King delivered at their meeting.

Letter from Victor Carter to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
California (CA)

Victor Carter writes a letter of support to Dr. King on behalf of he and his wife. The Carters are unable to attend the Selma to Montgomery march but enclose a check to aid in the civil right struggle.

Address to the Montgomery Improvement Association

Monday, December 5, 1955
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King discusses the inequality in America and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He says that he will work to eliminate discrimination in Montgomery and he encourages the audience to participate and actively seek change as well.