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Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Letter from Annie L. Cook to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Annie Cook asks Dr. King to make a speech at a program sponsored by the Greenbrier County branch of the NAACP. She predicts that the program will be informative and improve communication between Negros and whites.

MLK Speaks on Church Bombing in Birmingham, AL

Monday, September 16, 1963

Dr. King speaks on the bombing at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church that killed four girls in Birmingham, Alabama.

Meet the Press Interview

Sunday, August 13, 1967

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from W. Daniels to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

W. Daniels corresponds to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak in Montreal at the Grand Master's Banquet on August 13, 1968.

Letter from Patricia Kleps to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King informs Mrs. Patricia Kleps that he will be unable to fulfill her request to speak at the First Unitarian Church in San Francisco. However, Dr. King pledges to contact her around January of 1968 to possibly schedule a date for him to address her congregation.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Letter from MLK to Dr. E.F.S. Davies

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Dr. King recognizes the significant work of fellow activist A.J. Muste and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. He states that he is a diligent member of the organization and pledges his full fledged support to Muste's leadership.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding an Offer from Protestant Publishing

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this Letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about an offer from Shinkyo Shuppansha (Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd.). A description of an advancement pay, royalty percentage and number of copies are included in this letter.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

Letter from Aggrey Oji to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

Mr. Oji writes Mr. Brown thanking him for a previous correspondence of support regarding various issues in Nigeria. Mr. Oji also offers to meet with Mr. Brown and other members of the American Negro Leadership Conference to discuss further issues.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Letter from Richard Dannenfelser to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966

The acting chaplain of Ohio Wesleyan University inquires of Dr. King's availability to speak at their college during his trip to Columbus. Dr. King is scheduled to address the Ohio Council of Churches Pastors' Convention.

Letter from Alice Sargent to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Alice Sargent, the Assistant Director of Student Activities at Temple University, inquires what role the students can play in the Civil Rights Movement and sends a sample of one of the students' editorials.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Letter from Senator Charles Percy to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967

Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that the Senate Housing and Urban Affairs Subcommittee is proceeding to report a bill to the Senate that could become the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1967. The bill would assist lower income families and shrink the gap between white and black America, while expanding the economic opportunities for all.

Letter from Jitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Jitsuo Morikawa, Secretary for Evangelism at the American Baptist Jubilee Advance, asks Dr. King to address the organization's Evangelism Luncheon in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Clarence Lundquist

Thursday, March 15, 1962

Dr. King writes to the administrator of wage hour and public contracts division for the U.S. Department of Labor, Clarence Lundquist. In this telegram, Dr. King requests that Lundquist investigate a violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act at Seapak Shrimp Factories. It is here that African Americans were told to sign statements that said they were handicapped. If the forms were signed the African American workers received significantly lower wages than before.

Postcard Congratulating MLK for Receiving the Nobel Prize

Louise Dekker-Brus congratulates Dr. King on the Nobel Peace Prize and writes that their newspaper says that, in King, America has its Joan of Arc.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Letter from New York City Mayor to MLK

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The Mayor of New York, John V. Lindsay, invites Dr. King to a conference entitled "Puerto Ricans Confront the Problems of the Complex Urban Society: A Design for Change." Panel meetings will expound on twelve subjects ranging from "Education" to the "Administration of Justice."

Letter from MLK to Berl Bernhard

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King writes Berl Bernhard, Staff Director of the Commission on Civil Rights, to introduce him to Mrs. Walter Lee Mengledorff. Mrs. Mengledorff is a resident of Savannah, Georgia, and "has concrete evidence on voting irregularities in Chatham County, Georgia. She is interested in bringing the whole matter to the attention of the Commission on Civil Rights.

SCLC's People to People Tour

The SCLC held their Alabama "People to People Tour" from December 5-8, 1962. This itinerary lists the SCLC staff that participated in addition to the locations of their meetings.

Letter from Stanley Becker to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Stanley Becker, the principal at the Amsterdam School in New York, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Invitation from the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Dr. king is invited to participate in the National Conference on Race and Education by the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."