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Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from Irene Zimmerman to MLK

Sunday, January 29, 1967

Miss Zimmerman expresses disapproval in Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Telegram from Marshall L. Shepard to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Rev. Shepard, pastor of Mount Oliver Tabernacle Baptist Church, offers words of encouragement to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in Bessemer, Alabama.

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

Wednesday, March 9, 1966

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Installation Program for Rev. Kelly Miller Smith

Sunday, September 29, 1963

This is the program for the installation of the Reverend Kelly Miller Smith as Pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Reverend Smith is installed as the Eighth Minister of the historical church, which began in 1893.

Letter from Charles C. Diggs Jr. to the General Motors Corporation

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

In this letter, Congressman Charles Diggs of Michigan asks Mr. Louis Seaton of General Motors for his comments in regards to automobile dealerships. The Congressman then points out that General Motors is the only one of the "Big 3" automobile companies that has not taken initiative in having a Negro franchise holder.

Request for SCLC Information from Frederick A. Meiser Jr.

Frederick Meiser tells Dr. King that he has become deeply interested in the SCLC and requests more information about the organization.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Forgiveness and Repentance

Dr. King reviews a passage from the Book of Ezekiel regarding forgiveness and repentance. Summarizing the verse, he states that repentance involves an "actual change of attitude" and forgiveness includes forgetting past mistakes.

Peace

Dr. King writes on the topic of peace.

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

Sunday, July 1, 1962

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.

Letter from Noel N. Marder to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Noel N. Marder, manager of the Negro Heritage Library, encloses a silver certificate from a coin shop to attempt to amuse Dr. King. Mr. Marder also hopes to connect with Dr. King to discuss his thoughts regarding the new plans that are in a stage of creation.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Schleiermacher and the Bible

Dr. King references a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher regarding the relationship between religion and sacred texts.

Social Ethics

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 3:15 while taking notes about social ethics. The passage that he quotes says that those who oppress others are sinning against God.

Letter from George F. Berlinger to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Mrs. George Berlinger of the Nathan Hofheimer Foundation, informs Dr. King that the organization will not be including the SCLC in their budget. The Nathan Hofheimer Foundation sought to improve the living conditions of the underprivileged.

Telegram from MLK to Mr.& Mrs. Dick Gregory

In this telegram, Dr. King praises Mr. Gregory for his stance regarding human justice on behalf of another oppressed minority, the Nisgually Indians.

Letter from James M. Nielsen to MLK

Tuesday, January 14, 1964

James M. Nielson congratulates Dr. King on receiving Time Magazine's Man-of-the-Year Award. Mr. Nielson invites Dr. King to the Sixth Annual Trade Fair sponsored by the Anacortes Jaycees.

"King's New Book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 23, 1967

This Argus newspaper clipping is a mini review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Mr. David Winder to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

Mr. David Winder writes Dr. King in an attempt to gain an interview during one of Dr. King's upcoming visits to New York.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Major J. Jones writes to Dr. King, offering to host the SCLC's Annual Spring Board Meeting in Chattanooga, where he is a district superintendent of the Methodist Church. Mr. Jones mentions that having the SCLC in Chattanooga would help the city. However, Dr. King couldn't accept Mr. Jones' invitation due to prior arrangements to host the 1965 SCLC Spring Board Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

Letter From Emma Kramer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Emma Kramer writes Dora McDonald concerning a cancelled contract for Dr. King. Kramer emphasizes how imperative it is for a letter to be written on Dr. King's behalf providing an explanation as to why he is unable to fulfill his commitment.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Richard Russell

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King conveys his well wishes to Mr. Russell for a speedy recovery.

Letter from Rev. Sandy F. Ray to MLK

Friday, July 15, 1966

Rev. Sandy Ray (Uncle Sandy), of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York, expresses deep appreciation to Dr. King for his sermon "Guidelines for a Constructive Church," delivered at the dedication of their new Center.

Letter from MLK to William Sibley

Monday, July 13, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Sibley for his contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He also reports the results of a recent fundraising reception, which will be used to establish Dr. Robert Hayling's practice and provide legal defense to participants in the Albany and St. Augustine Movements.

Letter from Charles J. Benner to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966

Dr. King is adversely described in this letter and accused of being a communist by Charles Benner. He further slanders the Negro race and objects to the current national movements lead by Dr. King.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967

T. K. Mahadevan, of the Gandhi Peace Foundation in New Delhi, India, refers to potential meetings with Dr. King and his colleagues.

Poor People's Campaign News

Friday, March 15, 1968

This newsletter shares details regarding the end of a historic meeting of American minority group leaders who declared unanimous support for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. The names of organizations and leaders pledging their support are also included.