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Letter from Jean Rand to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Jean Rand writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech regarding peace in Vietnam and sends him a monetary contribution.


Dr. King notes three points about preaching.

Letter from Fred C. Becker to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Fred C. Becker requests Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements where he plans on selling his books. Becker has published several of Dr. King's books in past.

Anonymous Letter to the SCLC

This anonymous writer seeks assistance from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the removal of Judge George Jackson from the Ocmulgee Superior Court. The author claims Jackson was involved in the wrongful freeing a man convicted of murder.

Foreword to Neil Sullivan's Book by MLK

Dr. King submits a rough draft of his foreword for a text written by Berkeley County Public Schools Superintendent Neil Sullivan.

Letter from Jerome Miller to Andrew Young

Monday, January 23, 1967

Jerome Miller, a field representative for Encampment for Citizenship, writes to Andrew Young requesting a meeting and soliciting direction for selecting students to attend an upcoming event.

Letter from Dorothy L. Shereff to MLK Regarding a Book on Gandhi

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Dorothy Shereff, Rights and Permissions Manager for The New American Library, requests that Dr. King send a statement to promote Professor Louis Fischer's book on Mahatma Gandhi.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Letter from Clarence Long to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Congressman Long writes Dr. King delighted to inform him of his full support regarding home rule for the District of Columbia.

Statement by MLK on the U.S. Stand in Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Dr. King discusses how to involve the public in discussions regarding the Vietnam War. He states that the public should be educated about the history and issues of the war.

Telegram from Jacob K. Javits to MLK

Amidst the confusion of varying interpretations, Senator Jacob K. Javits asks Dr. King to share his interpretation of the term "black power," so that it can serve as a guide to others.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Support Letter to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966

The author of this letter is sending Dr. King a book entitiled 'Satyagraha in South Africa' by Mahatma Gandhi. The book holds similarities to Dr. King's book 'Stride Towards Freedom'. The author of the letter describes how both books have provided inspiration to those who believe in the philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mamie Reese

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King's assistant writes Mamie Reese to applaud Eartha Kitt's courage in speaking up about what she believes is the cause of “restlessness” and crime in the streets. Kitt spoke out against the Vietnam War at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, the First Lady.

Correspondence - Contribution Thank-You Letter from MLK to Chris Folcker 8/16/66

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

In this document Dr. King expresses great appreciation for the Swedish Consul General's donation of $100,000. The amount of this contribution would underscore that Sweden's commitment to Dr. King's work and the civil rights movement in general did not stop at the proverbial edge of the Nobel Peace Prize's water.

Letter from Shelia Mills to MLK

Sunday, December 13, 1964

Shelia Mills, a 7th grade student, commends Dr. King for his efforts within the nonviolence movement and for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.


Dr. King discusses the weakness of "non theistic humanism."

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Letter from Ben Cashion to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Ben Cashion writes Dr. King sharing some of his observations. Cashion suggests that Dr. King takes his time and get closer to God to provoke efficient change.


Dr. King defines infralapsarianism.

Letter from Claude Leman to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Claude Leman, Chairman of the University Model United Nations, invites Dr. King to speak at a Model United Nations Seminar in Montreal, Canada.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

Raphael Gould Thanks MLK For Support

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Gould thanks Dr. King for his letter of support to the Clergymen's Emergency Committee in Vietnam. Gould further approves of King's dialogue printed in Playboy Magazine and encourages him to go on late night TV interview shows to reach a larger population of Americans.

Adverse Letter from J. H. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

J. H. Moore expresses his dislike for Dr. King's leadership style. He argues that Dr. King's efforts have stirred up hatred and discontent, even amongst black citizens.

SCLC Newsletter: January-February 1966

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This early 1966 SCLC Newsletter reports the organization's recent activity. Main columns focus on Hosea Williams' voter registration work in Birmingham, Alabama and efforts towards slum eradication in Chicago and Atlanta. The document also includes photographic content of Dr. King's public speaking endeavors and evidence of the slum crisis. Consistent school inequities and segregation are the last topics discussed.

SCLC Fund Appeal from MLK

Dr. King discusses SCLC's continued priority work in the South. the Los Angeles riots and the need for ongoing voter registration. He makes the point that, "contributions are more than money - they are affirmations of confidence and dedication to democratic change."