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Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1962

In this letter to Dr. King, Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College informs Dr. King about the meeting with Robert Troutman on matters that involve input from President Kennedy.

Request Letter from Marchen- und Fabelbuch Gesellschaft

Saturday, December 30, 1967

In this Marchen- und Fabelbuch Gessellschaft is requesting that Dr. King contribute to an International Fairy-Tale and Fable-book. The book is a charitbale action to benifit UNICEF.

Symbolic Mountains

On the stationary of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York, Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Symbolic Mountains." These include the mountains of ethical relations, practical materialism, indifference concerning poverty, and racial segregation.

Letter from Jack Malpas to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1961

Jack Malpas, a member of the Episcopal Church's Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, contributed financially to the SCLC. Mr. Malpas informs Dr. King that he is working on the appeal for the Prayer Pilgrimage and expresses his previous experience in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Rev. Max F. Daskam to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests the return of Dr. King's presence for their Pulpit Schedule of the current year. Years have passed since Dr. King has visited and the church "would rejoice" if he could provide a date.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

NAACP Remembers MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

The NAACP released this comprehensive tribute in Dr. King's memory. The tribute was printed in The New York Post on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details an amended budget for the SCLC's Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey B. Preston

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dora McDonald sends a reply to the Mrs. Carey B. Preston accepting an invitation on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from Bernard Hollowood to MLK about Writing an Article

Thursday, July 28, 1966

"Punch" editor Bernard Hollowood asks Dr. King to write an article focusing on the following question: "Is America capable of solving its own race problems?" The article would be part of a series of articles focusing on whether the United States can be trusted as leader of the Western World.

Cooperative/Noble Competition

Dr. King writes a sermon on the topic "Cooperative Competition." King utilizes the biblical text deriving from Luke chapter 22 verse 24, which expresses how Jesus views competition. According to the text, Jesus thinks that competition is good as long as an individual competes with humility and serving others.

Letter from H. Melvin Lieberstein to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

H. Melvin Lieberstein thanks Dr. King for the personal letter Lieberstein received. Lieberstein adds quiet support to Dr. King, stating that in his chosen career field he regrets an inability to provide more active support.

Letter From Joan Daves to Hermine Popper

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Joan Daves informs Hermine Popper of an issue regarding writing credit for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here."

SCLC Resolution "To Fulfill These Rights"

Thursday, June 2, 1966

The SCLC releases a copy of the resolution, "To Fulfill These Rights," created by the SCLC's Alabama staff and sent to the White House Conference. Hosea Williams states in the resolution that Negroes who voted in the primary were intimidated by white segregationist to not vote in the run-off.

Employment Testing Disenfranchises Minority Groups

Monday, March 11, 1968

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases a report revealing the frequency and impact of employers' discriminatory hiring procedures. Staff Director of the Commission William L. Taylor emphasizes the improper use of employment testing greatly undermines "the goal of providing equal employment opportunities for minority group members."

Letter from MLK to Gleason Jackson Regarding Negro National Flag

Thursday, July 13, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Jackson for designing a flag promoting unity among black people. Although Dr. Kings feels a flag such as this has implications of separatism, he encourages Mr. Jackson to continue publicizing his ideas regarding black unity.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to Dora McDonald

Monday, January 9, 1967

Carey McWilliams writes Dora McDonald acknowledging confirmation of Dr. King's commitment to speak for "The Nation's" conference in Los Angeles.

Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.

Man: Sinner

Referencing Psalms 14:3, Dr. King discusses the completeness of sin in relationship to man.

Letter from Brown University Chaplain Julius S. Scott Jr. to MLK Regarding a Visit

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Julius Scott, Acting Chaplain at Brown University, acknowledges Dr. King's tentative acceptance of an invitation to preach at the university. Scott expresses his satisfaction with the response and his hopes that Dr. King will be available to visit during the time period specified.

Telegram from Mrs. J W E Bowen and Mrs. S F Crank to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Mrs. J W E Bowen and Mrs. S F Crank write Dr. King expressing their joy in having a spiritual leader who challenges them to be active in the movement.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter from David J. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

David Walker, Chairman of the Speakers Committee for Toronto Junior Board of Trade writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at their Tuesday night dinner meeting. Walker continues with his own personal adulation on the Reverend receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.

Letter from Rabbi Israel Miller to MLK

Friday, November 11, 1966

On the eighteenth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Rabbi Israel Miller, Chairman of the American Jewish Conference on Soviet Jewry, invites Dr. King to speak over a national telephone hook-up.

Telegram from Mike Bibler to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Mike Bibler contends that "our lame duck president" can "do more for black people than any other man in history." This telegram was sent following President Johnson's announcement that he would not seek re-election.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

Letter from MLK to Rev. Stanley Terry

Wednesday, October 10, 1962

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Reverend Terry of New York for his witness in Albany, Georgia.