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Memorandum from the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Pittsburgh, PA, Philadelphia, PA

The purpose of this memorandum from Rev. James Morton and James Twomey was to attempt to get funding for urban renewal. It was the goal of the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission to create low-income housing for those in need.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles E. Boddie

Friday, February 17, 1961
New York (NY), New York, NY, Connecticut (CT)

Dora McDonald informs Charles Boddie that Dr. King cannot accept any speaking engagements for his desired date because he has previously committed to having lunch with some students and faculty.

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Letter from MLK to Beulah H. Brunson

Monday, January 30, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Beulah H. Brunson of the Georgiana Thomas Grand Chapter O. E. S. for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King comments on the progress made over the past decade in improving conditions for Negroes in the South.

Moral Progress

Dr. King describes moral progress as endless struggle toward "an infinite goal," which will lead to "happiness."

Telegram from Leslie Dewart to MLK

Monday, July 19, 1965
CANADA

On behalf of The International Teach-in Committee, Professor Dewart invites Dr. King to participate teach-in in Toronto.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Florida (FL)

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

Letter from Marion Arnold to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Marion Arnold, chairman of the Ecumenical Mission Committee of Broadway United Church of Christ, expresses thanks for the copy of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Telegram from Dora McDonald to C. I. C. Bosanquet

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
UNITED KINGDOM

Dora McDonald informs C. I. C. Bosanquet, the Vice Chancellor at the University of Newcastle, of Dr. King's upcoming arrival to the university and regrets his inability to stay longer.

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Letter from Rev. Milton Reid to MLK

Tuesday, January 28, 1964
Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC)

Rev. Milton Reid invites Dr. King to Petersburg, Virginia to be the speaker at the 190th Anniversary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Reid mentions to Dr. King that the church holds historical significance because meetings about abolishing slavery were held at the church by Nat Turner and John Brown. Reid asks Dr. King to suggest another speaker if he is unable to accept the invitation.

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962
SOUTH AFRICA

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.

Letter from Fabian Bachrach to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL)

Fabian Bachrach requests that Dr. King sit for a portrait that will be included in a public show celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of the Bachrach studio. Bachrach offers to give Dr. King complimentary prints as payment.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

MLK Style Sheet: Why We Can't Wait

Here we see what is known as a style sheet for Dr. King's third book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King's book was published in 1964 following the success of the infamous SCLC Birmingham desegregation campaign.

Letter from Erma Jewell Hughes to MLK

Wednesday, February 12, 1964
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Erma Jewell Hughes writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize award and cover on Time Magazine as "Man of the Year." Hughes invites the Reverend to speak at the Business College's annual commencement and encloses traveling expenses for the event. Hughes also states that they are raising additional funds to go towards the "Freedom Fight."

Location & Situation

Dr. King compares the meanings of "location" and "situation."

Letter from Marguerite B. Pilling to Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Marguerite B. Pilling writes Dr. Abernathy to show her support of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes the Negro could actually bring the United States back to a time of decency by bringing back prayer in public schools and removing violence from TV.

Santayana

Dr. King records George Santayana’s poem, “Oh World, Thou Choosest Not the Better Part!”

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares an Easter sermon entitled "Why Death Could Not Hold Him." He references scripture passage Acts 2: 24. The date and place of delivery for this sermon is unknown.

Letter to Dora McDonald from F. Fishman

Friday, October 27, 1967
AUSTRALIA

This document is a correspondence between Mr. Frank Fishman and Miss. Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary. Mr. Fishman had enclosed a copy of a letter dated July 25 and his letter September 25, enquiring that he did not receive a reply about his script that was sent back July 25, 1967.

How Do You View the Progress in School Desegregation?

New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Lowndes County, AL, Philadelphia, MS

In this special for the New York Times, Dr. King shares his opinion on the progress made in desegregating schools.

Letter from MLK to Vera Jones

Thursday, December 2, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Vera Jones for her support of the Freedom Movement and the SCLC.

Letter from Chester Sims to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966
Chicago, IL

Chester Sims of the Chess Record Company, recommends Charles Souder to Dr. King. He attests that Mr. Soulder is a dedicated man who showed loyalty during his service with SCLC.

Telegram from Mrs. Terry Brown to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Terry Brown writes Dr. King reflecting on her participation in the Great Freedom March. She also expresses to Dr. King how his words are a source of inspiration.