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"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

Letter from to Mrs. B. B. Tolman

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

Dr. King writes to Mrs. E. B. Tolman, thanking her for her support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Letter from the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Ulf Sviden, Chairman of the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch, sends Dr. King a congratulatory letter for his Nobel Peace Prize Award and an invitation to speak to the students of Stockholm.

Letter from Representative Ken W. Dyal to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to inform him that he has signed the discharge petition for the Home Rule Bill.

Letter from Mr. Jonathan B. Weisbuch to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

Mr. Weisbuch offers a monetary donation to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He praises Dr. King for his continued efforts in reforming the South and the entire country.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Letter from Vivian Washington to MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Vivian E. Washington requests that Dr. King, who is recovering in a Harlem Hospital, review her publication "Mount Ascutney" and provide her with feedback.

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

Monday, April 13, 1964

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

Telegram from Mr. David Susskind to MLK

In this telegram, Mr. Susskind invites Dr. King to participate in a "'Open End' two hour debate with Governor George Wallace."

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee on the issues of civil rights, segregation, and voters registration. He urges the party to join the crusade for social justice and equality for all.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson To Mrs. Arthur Stengel

Monday, June 29, 1964

Lady Bird Johnson writes Mrs. Arthur Stengel expressing amazement at her likeness of the President. Sally Stengel was a sculptress whose likeness of Eleanor Roosevelt is permanently placed at the White House. Joseph Mermel contracted Dr. King to inquire whether he wished a similar bust of himself.

Telegram from MLK to Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King expresses his gratification to Senator Edward M. Kennedy for sponsoring the amendment to abolish the poll tax in state elections.

Letter from S. O. Adebo to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

S. O. Adebo, a permanent representative of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the United Nations, requests a meeting with Mr. Brown and his colleagues. Mr. Brown is the Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa. This letter references the Nigeria-Biafra situation, which Dr. King was deeply concerned about.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

God

Dr. King records his thoughts on the book of Deuteronomy to illustrate the oneness of God.

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Letter from Abe Feinglass to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964

Abe Feinglass, International Vice-President of Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, requests that Dr. King review and comment on the organization's pamphlets.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 19, 1967

Ms. Daves informs Ms. McDonald that permission has been given to the High Commission of India's Education Department to publish a Marathi version of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Bill Daniels to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 2, 1967

Bill Daniels, the editorial cartoonist for WSB Radio and Television, responded to a letter he received from Ms. Dora McDonald concerning a cartoon. He suggested that she have her television adjusted, as the cartoon is "by no means a negro."

Letter from Uvee Mdodana Arbouin to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965

Uvee Arbouin thanks Dr. King for a past letter and encloses a financial contribution. She expresses that he has never received a donation that is "backed with" so much gratitude for his leadership.

Letter from Sandra Greenia to MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963

Sandra Greenia requests that Dr. King send her some information regarding integration. She emphasizes that she gained a lot by living in various integrated U.S. Naval Bases.

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

Friday, April 7, 1967

Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

MLK in Memoriam

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

Thank You Letter from MLK to Reverend Terrell

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr.King expresses his deep appreciation to Union Baptist Church for their generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.