Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC"

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

SCLC Supporter Paul Anderson Scolds MLK

Mr. Anderson expresses his concerns about Dr. King's upcoming Washington D.C. demonstration. He believes that, if the demonstration is successful, lower income citizens will have to pay higher taxes.

Work Summary of Rachel Davis DuBoise

This document is a brief work summary for Rachel Davis DuBoise as a member of the Dialogue Department of SCLC covering the periods from November 1965 to October 1966.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

Materialism

Dr. King quotes Hugh Elliott’s “Modern Science and Materialism.”

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

Sunday, August 5, 1962

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia, writes to Mr. Walker regarding Dr. King's refusal to reveal the name of the persons recommending and interviewing Jack O'Dell.

Letter from Wilton Hall Jr to MLK

Friday, January 13, 1967

President of Droke House Publishers, Wilton Hall, Jr., requests copies of Dr. King's speeches, sermons, press conferences, articles, and interviews for the completion of a book volume entitled "The Quotable Martin Luther King."

Telegram from Gabriel Allen to MLK

Gabriel Allen writes Dr. King to state his opinion on when civil rights will be achieved in America.

History

Dr. King cites Reinhold Niebuhr's definition of history and its relation to God.

Invitation from President Kennedy to MLK

The President of the United States invites Dr. King to attend a luncheon at the White House.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Erma Jewell Hughes to MLK

Wednesday, February 12, 1964

Erma Jewell Hughes writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize award and cover on Time Magazine as "Man of the Year." Hughes invites the Reverend to speak at the Business College's annual commencement and encloses traveling expenses for the event. Hughes also states that they are raising additional funds to go towards the "Freedom Fight."

Resurrection

Dr. King paraphrases Karl Barth's description of the resurrection in "The Epistle to the Romans."

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter from MLK to Heinz Ehrlick

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. Ehrlick for his encouraging letter and suggestions.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Letter from John Askins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

John Askins requests that Dr. King correct the transcription of an earlier interview for publishing purposes.

Letter from MLK to J. Martin England

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

Dr. King express his appreciation for Mr. J. Martin England's support.

Letter from Miriam Ottenberg to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Miriam Ottenberg, President of the Women's National Press Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and asks if he would address a luncheon for the Club. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from MLK to Professor William Goldsmith

Thursday, October 17, 1963

Dr. King sends his appreciation to Professor William Goldsmith for the contribution made by the students and faculty of Brandeis University to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from W. Ivan Hoy to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963

W. Ivan Hoy, on behalf of the University of Miami, invites Dr. King to be a guest lecturer for their Miami Religion Lecture Series.

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

MLK's Column on Jackie Robinson's Induction in Hall of Fame

Saturday, August 4, 1962

In this column from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King echoes his speech at the induction of Jackie Robinson into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Robinson not only broke the color barrier in major league baseball, MLK points out, he succeeded in business. MLK lauds Robinson's truth-telling as he spoke out against discrimination in the north and south, by whites and blacks, and on racial and religious grounds.

This is SCLC

This brochure provides readers with the history of the SCLC, as well as the purpose and breakdown of its staff and programs.

Letter from Daniel Glantz to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

This letter is from Daniel Glantz of Sweden. Glantz wrote the letter because he was ordered to do so by beings from outer space. According to Glantz the space beings look like angels and the angels would like to meet with Dr. King, whose mission they morally support. Glantz ends his letter by asking Dr. King if he recognizes the cosmic symbol, which is in the upper left-hand corner of the document and appears as a red circle with a white cross topped by a green triangle or pyramid.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.