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Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Paix, Bonheur, Sante et Amour pour l'an 1960

Friday, January 1, 1960

Dr. King received this card from the editor of the French tabloid Paris-Jour (Paris Day). The headline reads, "Peace, Happiness, Health and Love for the Year 1960."

Rev. Leon Howard Sullivan's Resume

This resume details Rev. Leon Howard Sullivan's degrees, affiliations, awards, works and accomplishments. SCLC's Operation Breadbasket was modeled after the Selective Patronage program that Rev. Sullivan developed.

Stop the War Bring the Troops Home

This brochure advertises a program to rally the support for eradicating the United States influence in Vietnam. It is distributed by The October Mobilisation, an Australian initiative responding to a call for international protest of the Vietnam War.

Royalty Statement for Casterman Published Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement references royalties earned for a French-language edition of "Strength to Love".

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Letter from Thomas M. Ward to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Thomas M. Ward, Assistant to the Minister of Calvin Presbyterian Church, requests that Dr. King provide documentation to defend against allegations of being a Communist or Communist sympathizer.

The Negro is the Most Glaring Evidence of White American's Hypocrisy

Dr. King shares the desire and need of American Negroes to have a social revolution for equality.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

U.S. News and World Report: Is Insurrection Brewing in U.S.?

Monday, December 25, 1967

This article in the U.S. News and World Report features an interview with Richard H. Sanger, known for his experience in the United States Foreign Service and his abilities to recognize the patterns of political violence.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry Cohen

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, drafts this correspondence to Rabbi Henry Cohen in regards to a book he is publishing. Miss McDonald informs Rabbi Cohen that Dr. King grants permission to use excerpts from "Letter From Birmingham Jail." She also mentions the enclosure of Dr. King's reply and Dr. King wanting a copy of the book when published.

Letter from MLK to Peter Servetnyk

Thursday, July 14, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation from Peter Servetnyk to speak in Toronto.


Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

Integration Details in Wilcox County

Thursday, December 22, 1966

On September 23, 1966, Wilcox County School in Alabama was integrated. However, the amount of "physical acts" and "extreme brutality" directed towards the Negro students was so great that the parents of the students prohibited their children from attending just a few months later. In this report, Robert L. Green, the Education Consultant to the SCLC, outlines the details of this event to Mr. John Doar of the U.S. Justice Department. He tells Mr.

David T. Doherty Letter of Request to Dr. King

Friday, February 10, 1967

Mr. Deherty, a PH.D candidate at Stanford University, asks Dr. King if he will answer a few questions regarding the influence of Henry David Thoreau on his philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from Sister M. Angelice to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Sister Angelice, Acting President of Ursiline College in Louisville, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and expresses admiration for his civil rights efforts.

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Juan Mari Bras to MLK

Sunday, February 19, 1967

Juan Mari Bras, Secretary-General of the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, writes Dr. King about Puerto Rican opposition to the Vietnam War. Bras informs Dr. King that his group will be at the April 15th Mobilization Committee Against the War in Vietnam rally outside of the United Nations. Bras hopes to communicate with Dr. King face to face and exchange ideas.

Letter from Wendell Morgan to SCLC

Monday, July 31, 1967

Wendell Morgan encloses a check to SCLC on behalf of the Howard University Campus Chest.

NAACP Presents to the City Commission

This list was presented by the St. Augustine branch of the NAACP to the City Commission.

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Thursday, February 22, 1968

In this response letter to Hugh Daugherty, Dr. King extends his deep appreciation for contributions made to the SCLC. The reverend also apologizes for the delay in response.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

Rio Grande Farm Workers Bulletin

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

This bulletin describes the difficulty that migrant farm laborers have encountered forming organizations to improve economic conditions.

Letter from David Gibbons and David O. Woodward to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963

David Woodyard and David Gibbons send Dr. King a check to support the work of the SCLC. Woodyard and Gibbons are employed at Denison University in Granville, Ohio.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Staff Sergeant Edward Taylor, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance or advice in appealing his bar to reenlistment and court martial.

Nature and Thought

Dr. King summarizes views of Alfred North Whitehead in ?The Concept of Nature.?

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Wednesday, July 8, 1964

In this letter Senator Hubert Humphrey urges Dr. King to accept an invitation to speak at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

The Martin Luther King Column

This column, written by Dr. King, depicts his philosophy on the complete human life. He describes life to have three separate, yet connected dimensions. These dimensions are denoted as: length, breadth, and height. All are defined in great detail according to the Reverend's belief and experiences.

SCLC Executive Staff Meeting

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Dr. King provides Civil Rights Activist, Septima Clark, with information regarding the Executive Staff meeting for the SCLC. Dr. King requests that Ms. Clark have her report ready to present prior to the meeting.