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Letter from Lewis Conrad to MLK

Monday, January 14, 1963

The Penn Unitarian Fellowship of the University of Pennsylvania extends an invitation to Dr. King to meet with the student body for an informal discussion. The university desires Dr. King to converse with several race relation classes for a more realistic perspective from an active leader in the movement. Due to the growing population of the African American community in Philadelphia, it is the university's hope that Dr. King will address social issues specifically in Philadelphia.

Contribution Letter from Dr. and Mrs. Bacon to Dr. King

Friday, February 23, 1968

Dr. and Mrs. Bacon are writing to express their support and concern for the "last chance" SCLC project. Enclosed in the letter is $200 contribution to help further support the initiative.

God is Light

Dr. King prepares a sermon entitled, "God is Light." He refers to I John 1:5 during his preparation.

Letter from Kivie Kaplan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Kivie Kaplan discusses with Dora McDonald the order of 200 books with autographed signatures from Dr. King. Mr. Kaplan has appointed direction of the order to Miss Roberta Halpern of the Publication Division of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Friday, December 29, 1967

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

Handwritten notecard regarding Realism

Index card written by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Letter from Aubrey Brown Jr. to MLK

Monday, June 26, 1967

Aubrey Brown Jr., Editor of "The Presbyterian Outlook," asks Dr. King to provide a statement regarding the obligations American voters have to choose "officials who have high personal moral standards." The statement will be used in the publication's annual "Going to College" Handbook.

New Wars For Old

Alfred Noyes writes a poem entitled, "New Wars For Old." Mr. Noyes focuses on various aspects of life and repeatedly asks, "when have we prayed for peace."

Cognition

This note card discusses cognition in relation to the context of events.

Letter from Finley Drewery to NAACP

Saturday, June 17, 1967

Finley Drewery writes to the NAACP seeking aid for his upcoming criminal trial. He asserts that the state has no hard evidence against him and that his court appointed attorney is trying to make him pay $3,000 to mount a defense in court.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James P. Dixon of Antioch College

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Dr. James Dixon to express Dr. King's joy in his ability to accept Dr. Dixon's invitation to speak at Antioch College's commencement.

Pantheism

Dr. King writes about an unknown author's view of pantheism.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. Jesse Jackson

Dr. King writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson, urgently requesting his presence at a meeting of the Action Committee for Washington.

Letter from John E. Smylie to MLK

Friday, May 31, 1963

In this letter, Chaplain Smylie requests for Dr. King to preach at Occidental College. Smylie states, "We would be honored to have you or one of your representatives at Occidental."

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to Reverend Allen L. Johnson

Monday, April 12, 1965

Chauncey Eskridge informs Reverend Johnson that he has sought information from Jack H. Young and R. Jess Brown regarding the posting of bond money.

Letter from John and Eva Fillion to MLK about Moral Support

Thursday, March 14, 1968

This letter dated March 14, 1968 was written to Dr. King from John and Eva Fillion. In this letter they thank Dr. King for promoting the cause of freedom and tell him how grateful they are for all of his work in the fight for justice.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Ms. Saum applauds the positive attitude and accomplishments of organizations like the National Urban League, which she contrasts with the marches and riots that she feels hinder goodwill and cooperation.

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. Letter to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. is an organization dedicated to educating the youth through their distribution of scholarships. Wilson W. Woodbeck informs Dr. King that the organization will be honored to have him as an honorary member as they are entering into the third annual scholarship concert.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Mendelson regarding I Have A Dream

Tuesday, November 2, 1965

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Cantor Mendelson that Dr. King is pleased to know that the Men's Club of Beth Sholom is interested in setting to music excerpts from "I Have a Dream." McDonald refers Mendelson to Clarence Jones, an attorney who handles such matters.

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Letter from Dr. King to Miss Norwell

In this doucment, Dr.King apologizes for his delayed response and expresses gratitude for the song Miss Norwell sent him.

Letter from J. Campe to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"and "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this letter is enclosed a check and details of expenses for the Italian Edition of "Stride Toward Freedom and "Why We Can't Wait".

National Committee to Combat Nazism's Resolution on Civil Rights

Sunday, May 28, 1967

The National Committee to Combat Nazism passed this resolution, affirming the Civil Rights Movement and agreeing to send Dr. King and President Johnson a copy of their stance.

Letter from Miriam Ottenberg to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Miriam Ottenberg, President of the Women's National Press Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and asks if he would address a luncheon for the Club. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ozell Sutton

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Sutton's request for seventy-five copies of Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail." She regretfully informs the sender that their office is out of re-prints; however she suggests that he obtain copies of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in which the Letter from the Birmingham Jail is printed.

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Frank Emspak, Chairman of the National Coordinating Committee, writes Dr. King requesting SCLC's sponsorship for the anti-war convention. This letter helps track activities of national peace movement.

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

Wednesday, April 21, 1965

Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Book Sales

Friday, September 4, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves reports the sale figures for royalties and advances of the manuscript "Why We Can't Wait".