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Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL)

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
New York, NY

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa calls for all news media and wireless services to broadcast the release of "Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia." This call to action was prompted by racial rebellions led by Ian Smith. It was the hope of civil rights leaders to strengthen "Negro" and African relations by increasing support of peace in Africa.

Letter from Paul Shields to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Paul Shields, the News Director of CBS Television in Atlanta, writes to Dr. King to lodge a complaint against the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's press department. He states that press conferences convened by the SCLC rarely begin on time.

American Education: Segregation, Northern Style

Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, New Jersey (NJ), Connecticut (CT), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Massachusetts (MA), Indiana (IN)

This article from American Education focuses on the problem of de facto segregation in Northern and Southern cities that results from discrimination in housing and contributes to further housing discrimination and minority unemployment. De facto segregation is as detrimental as legalized (de jure) segregation. The author provides an overview of efforts around the country to eliminate segregation in public schools and some of the difficulties encountered.

Neighborhood Spotlight on Greater Cleveland

Cleveland, OH

This document contains information regarding the Urban League Housing Program, which provides statistical information on the communities in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area.

Telegram from Muhammad Ali to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

This message of support from Muhammad Ali was sent to Dr. King during his stay at the County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Albany, GA

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Letter from Lily E. Sternlow to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

With topics ranging from "The Poor Pay More for Less" to the featured article "Malawi's Anti-Christian Atrocities - A Shame on Africa," this edition of "Awake" magazine is forwarded by Lily Sternlow to Dr. King. After receiving word of Dr. King's travels to Africa, Sternlow brings attention to issues surrounding Christian witnesses in Malawi.

Letter Dated 11/14/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Wednesday, November 14, 1962
New York (NY)

Per Dr. King's request, Ms. Dora McDonald forwards the sermon "The Man Was A Fool," to Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishing. The sermon is to be included in a forthcoming book of Dr. King's sermons.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.


"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

New York (NY)

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Letter from Harris Schultz to MLK

Saturday, April 3, 1965
Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Harris Schultz questions the decision to impose an economic boycott in Alabama. He lists several reasons not to boycott, including the voting rights bill currently under consideration in Congress, the bombing of a Negro citizen's home in Birmingham and the apathy of some people in Alabama.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

Letter from Deacon Willie McClinek to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Deacon Willie McClinek invites Dr. King, on behalf of the Sensational Heavenly Dew Drops and The Stars of Faith gospel singers, to make an appearance at their play entitled "Master, I Want To Live" in Philadelphia.

Life (Poem)

Dr. King writes down part of playwright and composer Sir Noël Coward’s song “Twentieth Century Blues.”

Letter from the United Nations to SCLC

Friday, January 26, 1968
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), New York, NY

The United Nations Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, requests information regarding activities planned and undertaken by the SCLC against apartheid.


Dr. King cites chapter 5, verse 7 of the Old Testament book of Job. This scripture highlights the fact that trouble is necessary in life.


Dr. King quotes an excerpt from Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible."


Dr. King cites passages in the sixth century BCE Second Isaiah (chapters 40-55) as the first clear evidence of monotheism.


Dr. King references a quote from Proverbs regarding creation and God's wisdom.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961
Nashville, TN

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Telegram to W. L. James from Dr. and Ms. King

Monday, January 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King write Mrs. James expressing condolences following the death of her husband. Dr. James was a music educator at Spelman College and a 1923 graduate of Morehouse College . He served as Chairman of the Music Department at Spelman and Director of the Glee Club from 1933 to 1966. Dr. James died December 27, 1966.

Letter from Congressman William Ryan to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman William Ryan gives Dr. King an update regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act that is still under debate in Congress. Ryan, a staunch supporter of the bill, mentions his persistent efforts to keep the legislation from being blocked by adversaries.

A Promising Day for the City of Selma

Selma, AL

In this handwritten public statement, the author addresses the Negro citizens of Selma, Alabama by commending their efforts of non-violence during a one-thousand person demonstration for equal voting rights.

Letter from MLK to Senator Thomas H. Kuchel Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas H. Kuchel's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Senator Henry M. Jackson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Senator Henry M. Jackson expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.