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Joan Daves Informs MLK of a Proposal to Print the Speech from the March on Washington

Friday, October 23, 1964
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Washington (WA)

Joan Daves negotiates with John Avirgan on the royalty percentage for the rights to sale hand-lettered versions of the Speech from the March on Washington.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

Letter from the N.H.W.P.A to Dr. King

Chicago, IL

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing his dislike of African Americans.

Telegram from Hosea Williams to President Johnson

Tuesday, August 3, 1965
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Hosea Williams writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson requesting an investigation of the Andy Whatley murder.

Letter from Gus C. Zucco to MLK

Friday, October 12, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Gus Zucco writes Dr. King regarding the changes of his schedule in hopes that he will be able to speak in Pennsylvania.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Saturday, June 5, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, Mr. Dawkins informs Dr. King that the Summer Community Organization and Political Education, S.C.O.P.E., stands to benefit from the involvement of the VISTA organization.

Schleiermacher (Christology)

Dr. King outlines an excerpt from the author Schleiermacher in referencing an idea of Christ.

Sacrifice

Dr. King explains that Isaiah 1:11 means God can’t be appeased by sacrifice but demands righteous living.

Letter from Sidney Eisenberger to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1961
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Sidney Eisenberger sends a donation and words of encouragement to Dr. King. He praises Dr. King's work, particularly the focus on political involvement. He humorously writes that he hopes that he will one day be so unconscious of color that he will "feel free to regard a negro auto driver with the same venomous hatred I give to white drivers."

Letter from MLK to Ms. Susan Stauffer

Thursday, August 20, 1964
Berkeley, CA

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Susan Stauffer for her contribution to the SCLC. He states, "such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts."

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

Sin (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s “Normative Psychology of Religion.”

Speech to National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, South Africa, CONGO / ZAIRE

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

We Shall Overcome

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
New York (NY)

This program serves as a memorial exercise for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.

Letter from James R. Smith to MLK

Georgia (GA)

James R. Smith, the director of the Youth Christian Education Department of Athens Community, inquires if Dr. King can support his program by giving a donation.

Letter from Norma Perez to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Norma Perez sends her condolences to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

MLK's Graduation Picture From Boston University

Monday, June 1, 1959
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

This photograph captures Dr. King in his graduation gown from Boston University.

Letter from MLK to Lillian Robertson

Friday, February 28, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlantic City, NJ, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King apologizes for his late reply to Lillian Robertson of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, a division of the American Baptist Convention. He informs Mrs. Robertson that he will be preaching for the American Baptist Convention as a whole, so he will be unable to speak to the Fellowship in a smaller setting.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

Monday, April 1, 1968
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C.

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

The Director of the National Catholic Conference on Interracial Justice offers the support of his organization during Dr. King's imprisonment in Birmingham Jail.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), VIETNAM, Selma, AL

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Letter from Dora McDonald to J. Sackmann

Wednesday, December 13, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Ms. McDonald invites Sackmann's students on behalf of Dr. King to visit his office and speak with his executives.

The Plain Dealer: Dr. King Here Today to Gauge Tensions

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), Boston, MA

This article, printed in "The Plain Dealer," provides a brief history of Dr. King and details the plans he had for Cleveland, OH.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959
NIGERIA, Georgia (GA), Ohio (OH), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
New Mexico (NM), Atlanta, GA

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

South African Victims of Apartheid

Friday, December 10, 1965
CONGO / ZAIRE, ANGOLA, SOUTH AFRICA, New York, NY, New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The American Committee on Africa hosts a human rights rally and benefit on behalf of the victims of South African Apartheid. This program provides a brief history and overall purpose of the committee and outlines the projected schedule of events.