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MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Missouri (MO), Washington, D.C.

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

Telegram from Reverend William Coffin to MLK

Sunday, May 5, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Clergyman and peace activis William Sloane Coffin sends a telegram to Dr. King or "anyone in charge" informing them of his possible travel plans to Atlanta. Reverend Coffin provides telephone numbers and requests a response.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 14, 1964
New York, NY

This letter references the enclosure of a check as an advance for the German edition of "Strength to Love".

Telegram from MLK to Governor Albertis Harrison

Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA

Dr. King requests an investigation into acts of police brutality committed in Petersburg, Virginia during a demonstration.

Letter from Adrienne Lombardi to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Adrienne Lombardi writes Dr. King to express her gratitude that he believes everyone owes their first allegiance to God. She also discusses her view on religion and her sentiments regarding the war.

MLK Draft Text Retrieved by T.D. Johnston

Alabama (AL), INDIA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA, Montgomery, AL, Jackson, MS

The document is a dedication from T. D. Johnston of Huntsville, Alabama to the King Center. Mr. Johnston acknowledges being on an Eastern Airline plane with Dr. King in 1961, where he noticed that Dr. King tossed a speech text that he found. He decided to hold on to the document for preservation and donated it to the King Center. Martin Luther King, III received the document on behalf of the King Center.

MLK Outline on Preaching Ministry

Dr. King outlines the development of the preaching ministry. As an aspiring minister, Dr. King expresses how he wishes to develop his own ministry and provides ideas of the message he desires to share.

Letter from James R. Smith to MLK

Georgia (GA)

James R. Smith, the director of the Youth Christian Education Department of Athens Community, inquires if Dr. King can support his program by giving a donation.

Letter from Nils K. Stahle to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 2, 1964
New York, NY, NORWAY, NETHERLANDS

The Director of the Nobel Foundation, Niles K. Stahle, explains the copyright of Dr. King's Nobel Lecture. Stahle states that the Lecture belongs to the Nobel Foundation and that measures will be taken to preserve its integrity.

Letter from MLK to George Murphy

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy for giving witness in Albany, Georgia. Dr. King also comments on an upcoming vote and the role of churches in race relations.

Coretta's Personal Story

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Oslo, Norway, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL)

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, GA

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.

The Man Who Was a Fool

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Goodwin

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's request for Mr. Daniel Goodwin to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms.

Letter from Mary L. Bryant to MLK

Georgia (GA)

Mary L. Bryant writes Dr. King seeking help. She is a mother of eight and in desperate need of used clothes for her children. Her appeal comes as a result of financial hardship due to covering the medical expenses of a child with a serious illness.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Sunday, January 22, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This is a church program for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in early 1956. As Pastor, Dr. King gave a sermon on "Redirecting Our Missionary Zeal."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, San Francisco, CA, Arizona (AZ), Texas (TX), Missouri (MO), Pennsylvania (PA), Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH, Norfolk, VA, Richmond, VA

Here, Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, forwards a list of proposed touring cities to Mr. Harry Belafonte. She also comments on a recent special he did entitled, "Laughter."

MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.

Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

Thursday, January 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

White House Message on Civil Rights

Friday, January 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

President Johnson's message to Congress explains strides the U.S. has made in the social, educational and economic conditions of minorities in America. It also discusses areas that need improvement such as infant mortality rates and poverty levels among non-whites. The President calls for legislation to prevent violence against those exercising their civil rights, to strengthen enforcement powers of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission, to prevent discrimination on federal and state juries, and to guarantee fair housing.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Leslie Dixon Weatherhead’s “Why Do Men Suffer?”

Test of Address by Vice President Richard M. Nixon

Friday, October 19, 1956
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, GERMANY, Virginia (VA), Pennsylvania (PA)

Vice President Nixon discusses the legacy of Alfred E. Smith and how it correlates with the American dream.

Letter from Samuel H. Bassow to MLK

Saturday, April 8, 1967
VIETNAM, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Montgomery, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY

The New York Times, publishes an article, "Dr. King's Error" discussing the issue of Dr. King linking his opposition to the war in Vietnam and the fight for Negro equality. Samuel H. Bassow attaches a letter to the article supporting Dr. King stances.

Thank-U-Gram from Rev. Phil Stovin to MLK and Harold E. Stassen

Saturday, February 24, 1968
Milwaukee, WI

Rev. Phil Stovin extends his support to Harold E. Stassen and Dr. King for organizing Write-In votes in the 1968 Presidential Election.

Letter from Oakleigh Ross Bush to MLK

Saturday, June 25, 1966
Texas (TX)

Oakleigh Ross Bush discusses the significance of author Joel Candler Harris with Dr. King. Bush also tells Dr. King about a book of Harris' work, which Bush edited. Bush currently is trying to get the book published, but needs a forward written by "an eminent American Negro" in order for publishers to accept the manuscript.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968
VIETNAM, Cleveland, OH, BELGIUM, New York, NY

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960
New York, NY, NIGERIA, SOUTH AFRICA, LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA, INDIA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Discerning the Signs of History

FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King's sermon "Discerning the Signs of History" asserts "evil carries the seeds of its own destruction." King gives examples throughout history, such as slavery, colonialism, and the rise and fall of King Louis XVI.

Letter from Jacob H. Gilbert to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Congressman Gilbert writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter and copy of his book "Why We Can't Wait." Prior to the vote to seat the Mississippi delegation, Dr. King contacted several government officials urging them to vote against the seating. Congressman Gilbert states that he objected to the seating albeit unsuccessfully.