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Letter from Anne Farnsworth to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Anne Farnsworth acknowledges the kind letters Dr. King sends thanking her for the past financial contributions she has made to the movement. She further encloses a check in honor of the four little girls killed in the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham and the assassination of President Kennedy.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Memo from S. Leiss to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

S. Leiss encloses payment from Gakashu Kenkju Sha for a Japanese-language digest of "Why We Can't Wait" that was published in "Fair Lady."

Religion

Dr. King records a definition of religion from Wieman and Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Sunday, November 29, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, includes a summary of several foreign contracts drawn on Dr. King's behalf for three of his books.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

Photographed Sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt

This is a photographed sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt 1884-1962.

Reservation for Official Inaugural Book

This is the reservation form for the 1965 Official Inaugural Book in honor of Lyndon Baines Johnson and Hubert Horatio Humphrey.

Letter from Benjamin Singleteary to MLK

Thursday, December 16, 1965

Benjamin Singleteary, a student at Shortridge Junior High School in Indianapolis, requests Dr. King's autograph and other information for a class project on outstanding people.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alfred A. Haesler Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Thursday, October 5, 1967

In this correspondence to Alfred A. Haesler, Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, acknowledged the receipt of Mr. Haesler letter, inviting Dr. King to complete a writing assignment. However, due to prior engagements, Dr. King would not be able to complete any other publications, but offered that his book entitled, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?" answered most of the questions raised in the letter.

Letter from Dora McDonald to J. Sackmann

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

Ms. McDonald invites Sackmann's students on behalf of Dr. King to visit his office and speak with his executives.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Philip S. McConnell

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. McConnell for her support of his work. He also comments on the importance of adopting nonviolence principle to resolve conflicts internationally among nations, as well as to resolve social problems at home.

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."

Mission Development Report

Sunday, January 1, 1967

This report outlines the structure and development of the North Carolina Leadership Training Project.

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

Letter to MLK on Anti-Semitism

Friday, November 4, 1966

M.C. Gettinger, Executive Director at the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, writes to express dismay about alleged remarks about Jews made by Hosea Williams at Spelman College.

Schleiermacher (The Church)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “The Christian Faith.”

Telegram from N. K. Steele to MLK

N. K. Steele, on behalf of Bethel Baptist Church, offers prayers to Dr. King during his stay in the Care County Jail in Americus, Georgia.

Letter from M. G. Gilligan to MLK and James Baldwin

Saturday, July 6, 1963

Mrs. M. G. Gilligan expresses admiration to Dr. King and Mr. Baldwin for the production of the television program entitled "Perspectives."

Letter Envelope from MLK, Addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber

This envelope is addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter From MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Friday, February 9, 1968

This response letter, dated February 9, 1968, was addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Letter from Mrs. Uvee Mdodana-Arbouin to MLK

Friday, August 2, 1963

Mrs. Mdondana-Arbouin, President of the Women's Auxiliary of the Progressive Baptist National Convention, sends Dr. King the lyrics to the poem she delivered at their organization's recent dinner.

Invitation from President Kennedy to MLK

The President of the United States invites Dr. King to attend a luncheon at the White House.

Telegram from Operation Breadbasket Leaders to Ivan Allen

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

This telegram originates from leaders of the Atlanta chapter of Operation Breadbasket and urges the Mayor to take action on employment opportunities for African-Americans.

Letter from George Field to Ms. McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963

Mr. Fields requests advance text of remarks Dr. King is to give at the Twenty-second Freedom House Anniversary Dinner. The Freedom House Dinner receives major attention from the media and boasts a guest list of influential opinion makers.

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

Letter from William Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

William Ferguson of Prairie View, Texas extends an invitation for Dr. King to address the community. The community of Prairie View is engaged in a multiracial boycott with the aid of many white ministers. They seek Dr. King's appearance to give vitality to their movement.