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Statement by MLK on Jailings

Thursday, May 9, 1963
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King states that there have been blatant violations of constitutional principles in the arresting of nonviolent protesters. He further states that those incarcerated have been subject to beatings.

Letter from B. Hubert Holloman to MLK

Friday, July 12, 1963
North Carolina (NC)

B. Hubert Holloman asks Dr. King not to bring any more demonstrations to North Carolina, because he feels they lead to hate, violence, and encourage young people to break the law.

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Monday, May 23, 1966
Chicago, IL

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.


Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the subject judgment.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Chicago, IL

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Letter from Levi Eshkol to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Levi Eshkol, the Prime Minster of Jerusalem, welcomes Dr. King to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

The Tabernacle Baptist Church

Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Tabernacle Baptist Church publishes this program for their Young Adult Sunday on March 20, 1960. Dr. King is listed to deliver the sermon at morning worship service.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Sunday, March 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.

Soren Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes about Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard's first stage at which men live, aesthetics.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Rev. J. Martin England

Friday, May 5, 1967
South Carolina (SC)

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Rev. England that Dr.King spent a few days in the hospital. She asks for Rev. England to send the insurance forms for Dr.King to complete.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

Letter from MLK to Members of First Congregational Church Expressing Thanks For Their Contribution

Friday, January 5, 1968
California (CA)

In this letter, Dr. King offer his gratitude to the Fist Congregational Church for its contribution to the S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Randall Elias to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Randall Elias offers the support of himself and the North Shore Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action for the civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield.

Scientific Method (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "Religious Experience and Scientific Method." He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."


Dr. King writes that Isaiah 1:18-20 indicates that sacrifices are not needed to be saved from sin; willingness and obedience are the way to be saved.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable E.L. Bartlett

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Alaskan Congressman Edward Lewis Bartlett to express appreciation for his vote in support of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Charles E. Merrill, Jr.

Thursday, September 28, 1967
Boston, MA

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Charles Merrill for developing his ideas, being concerned about his health, and contributing funds that allow both work and rest.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King examines the contradictions in human nature in this handwritten draft of a sermon.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethel Sebastian

Friday, September 21, 1962
New York (NY), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Sebastian that Dr. King will make inquiries about her father when he returns to Albany and hopes the two will reunite soon.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

Letter to Dr. King from Ralph M. Otwell Requesting an Address to the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Tuesday, March 24, 1964
Chicago, IL

Mr. Otwell, representing the Chicago Sun-Times, has requested that Dr. King writes an address to be published in the Sunday edition, regarding the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Additionally, Mr. Otwell assures Dr. King that this will be an opportunity to promote his book, "Why We Can't Wait".

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

Letter from Patricia Reid to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Patricia Reid has mixed feelings about Dr. King and the position he has taken. Even though she and her husband agree with this stance on civil rights, they respectfully disagree on his position on the Vietnam War. The Reids believe that Dr. King shouldn't interfere with foreign policy unless he can come up with a viable solution to end the Vietnam War. However, they still feel compelled to contribute to the work of the SCLC, but warn Dr. King that other individuals may not be that sympathetic.

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.


Dr. King highlights a quote regarding time. [This quote is attributed to Henry Austin Dobson.]

Letter from Tom Cochran to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Tom Cochran, President of the Young Democrats at the University of Georgia School of Law writes to invite Dr. King to speak as a lecturer. According to Mr. Cochran, the political climate in the state of Georgia has increased the urgency for Dr. King to speak at the institution.

Customer's Reciept from MLK to Morehouse College

Atlanta, GA

This document is a customer's receipt from Dr. Martin L. King Jr. to Morehouse College.