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"CHINA"

Astronomy

Dr. King writes about the smallness of the earth in the great expanse of the universe.

Letter of Condolence from MLK

Friday, November 22, 1963

Dr. King expresses his grief as a result of President Kennedy's assassination.

Dictator

Dr. King reveals the definition of a dictator according to Plato.

The Montgomery Story

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King delivers an address entitled the "Montgomery Story" at the NAACP 47th Annual Convention. He address several issues throughout the address including: segregation, civil rights, equality, slavery and religion.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Letter from Andrew Bell III and Fred Fechheimer to MLK

Wednesday, June 30, 1965

The "Americans in Ethiopia Who Support Civil Rights in the United States" committee sends its support and a monetary contribution to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Nathaniel Barber to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965

Nathaniel Barber addresses Dr. King and encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC in the amount of $5.00. Barber sends his prayers to the Reverend and asks for a suitable picture to hang on the wall of his office.

Thank You Letter From MLK to Mrs. Helen N. Ceder

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mrs. Helen Ceder's contribution to Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He acknowledges that her support assists with many important projects such as voter registration and eradication of ghettos in the North.

Letter from Sharyl Green to MLK

Saturday, November 9, 1963

Sharyl Green, a junior at Roosevelt School in Michigan, expresses her admiration for Dr. King's work and inquires if Dr. King could send her his biography. Green also shares a piece of her literary work with Dr. King.

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

The Role of the Church

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK

Randolph T. Blackwell notifies Dr. King about the Office of Economic Opportunity grant to Crawfordville Enterprises in Taliaferro County, Georgia. The program will provide economic expansion for rural areas and education development.

Telegram from Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965

Mr. Spock invites Dr. King to send a representative to a discussion on the upcoming Washington Vietnam Mobilization.

Reading, Writing, and Race Relations

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Dorothy Singer wrote this piece,"Reading, Writing and Race Relations", regarding the racial integration in schools. Singer discusses several studies and their findings regarding integration.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. V. E. Moray

Friday, April 14, 1967

Joan Daves gives Dr. Moray permission to publish a Marathi edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Rutgers Professor Liberties Advocate

Thursday, August 18, 1966

Arthur Kinoy, a civil rights lawyer, was arrested in House Un-American Activities Committee hearings. During the few minutes he was in jail, Kinoy spent his time offering free advice to the other inmates.

Letter from Helen Harris to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Helen Harris, Chairman of the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto's Social Action Committee, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Beverly A. Asbury and David W. Stroh to the S.C.L.C.

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, dated January 4, 1968, the chaplains at Benton Chapel of Vanderbilt University enclose a check of support to the S.C.L.C.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $97.89 for 3765 copies.

Article about Mattie Coney

This article discusses Mattie Coney's accomplishments as the Founder of Citizens Forum.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Temporary Injunction by City of Birmingham Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

Judge W. A. Jenkins issues a temporary injunction against Wyatt Tee Walker based on the affidavits of Captain G. V. Evans and Captain George Wall. The order prohibits involvement with "mass street parades or mass processions or like demonstrations without a permit" and any other "acts calculated to cause breaches of the peace" in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Albert Turner to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Albert Turner requests financial assistance from Dr. King to aid with the voting campaign against Governor Wallace.

Harper & Row, Publishers' Royalty Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom

Monday, December 31, 1962

This document, dated in December of 1962, shows a statement of Dr. King's royalties from his first published book, Stride Toward Freedom. Notice that the retail price for the book was in the amount of $2.95. Harper & Row was the company that formulated the publication.

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions

In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.

Letter from Rhoda Dorsey to MLK

Thursday, May 21, 1964

Rhoda Dorsey, Dean and Associate Professor of History at Goucher College, informs Dr. King that they have included "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" on the freshman class reading list.

Letter from Charles W. Lockyer to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Charles Lockyer sends Dr. King a special limited edition of the International Library of Negro Life and History as a gift. Lockyer explains that the book series is a collaboration between his publishing company and the Association for Study of Negro Life and History.

Letter from James Dombrowski to MLK

Saturday, November 13, 1965

A letter to Dr. and Mrs. King, from Mr. James Dombrowski, thanks them for their support and contribution to SCEF.