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Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Plowshare Pledge from Sargent Shriver

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Indiana (IN), VIETNAM

This Plowshare Pledge, signed by Sargent Shriver, vows to use voting powers to have the savings of the military expenses invested in domestic human resources.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961
Nashville, TN

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

MLK's Statement to SCLC Describing SCOPE

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Louisville, KY, Memphis, TN, Nashville, TN

In this statement, Dr. King describes the Summer Community Organization and Political Education (SCOPE), an initiative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Its goals are to train local leaders, inform the public, and register individuals to vote.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, CANADA

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Letter from Queen N. Lewis to Coretta Scott King

Monday, April 16, 1956
Detroit, MI

Queen N. Lewis reaches out to Mrs. King to inquire about an upcoming trip to Detroit, Michigan. She mentions that she is a member of a church congregation that donated $1000 to the cause and informs Coretta that there is more she would like to discuss with her at a later date.

103:24 General Correspondence 1967 (S)

Monday, May 1, 1967
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Addressed to Sigrid L. Sharp, this receipt is forwarded to Minneapolis, MN for a donation of $3.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Curtis Cosby

Dr. King drafts a response letter to Mr. Cosby, stating he is aware of Senator Leroy Johnson's efforts to appoint Attorney Donald Hollowell as a federal judge. He is encouraged to learn of the Esquires Club's involvement and hopes the appointment is successful.

Letter from MLK to Douglas A.C. Davis

Friday, December 13, 1963
CANADA

Dr. King informs Douglas A. C. Davis that due to his current commitments, he will be unable to accept Davis' invitation to speak at the University of Western Ontario during the current academic year.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding a Publication

Thursday, March 30, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter Joan Daves informs Dr. King that a copy of the jacket text for "Where Do We Go from Here" is enclosed.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA)

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

Monday, April 1, 1968
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Boston, MA, Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

Memphis, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

Saturday, August 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.

Vietnam Peace Parade Flyer

New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, New York (NY)

This flyer, issued by the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, advertises to New Yorkers to head to D.C. for an anti-war demonstration on October 21st and 22nd. Calling for citizens to 'Confront the Warmakers in Washington,' this flyer features a young boy with a sign reading "Lyndon - I'm too young to die."

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962
Albany, GA

This paper states that segregation is both unconstitutional and immoral. It calls for a face-to-face meeting with the Albany, Georgia City Commission to discuss disposition of cases against the Albany Movement and a commitment to the First Amendment right of peaceful protest; clarification of the city’s position on the recent Interstate Commerce Commission ruling and desegregation of the city’s buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to recommend a timetable for desegregating lunch counters, the library, schools, and parks.

Telegram from MLK to Family of Marshall Shepherd

Friday, February 24, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King offers condolences and encouragement to the bereaved family of Marshall Shepherd, a Minister at Mt. Olivet Tabernacle Church in Philadelphia. Due to a previous commitment, Dr. King will be unable to attend the funeral.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Grayson

Thursday, February 15, 1962
West Virginia (WV), PUERTO RICO, Mississippi (MS)

Dora McDonald informs William Grayson that Dr. King's schedule does not permit him to make any more appearances in the year of 1962. Miss McDonald expresses her deep apologies for Dr. King's inabilities to attend.

Letter from Frieda E. Isenberg to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962
New York (NY)

Frieda Isenberg collected money from various friends and co-workers to support the cause of freedom in the South. The total contribution given was $22.00.

Negro's Defense Against Acts of Violence

Dr. King describes nonviolent direct action and its effects against oppressors of the movement. He speaks about the undaunted fight and relentlessness even in the face of brutality.

Food and Population Crisis Committee

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
New York, NY, INDIA, New Delhi, India, ISRAEL

Dr. David Lubbock and Dr. Jo Alter describe the economic conditions in New Delhi, India. The document lists the operations, communications, medical assistance, food and other things needed to provide relief to the population involved in the crisis.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Heardy

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Heardy offering his apologies for being unable to financially assist her. He asserts that the SCLC financial resources are aimed at changing the laws so that a welfare system can be developed to further provide for the less fortunate.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer blames Dr. King for riots and turmoil taking place in America.

May 1963, Letter from William M. Kunstler to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. requesting television interview

Wednesday, May 15, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

William M. Kunstler "Bill" writes to inform Dr. King of the National Educational Television's interest in doing a series of programs on the American Negro. Henry Norgenthau would like to interview Dr. King for the series.

Letter to MLK from G. Houghton

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Houghton writes to Dr. King with a plan for SABON (Saving and Building Organization of, by, and for the Negroes).

Look Magazine: Can Johnson Win His Other War?

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Connecticut (CT), West Virginia (WV), Maryland (MD), Indiana (IN), New York (NY), Florida (FL), San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Crusade for Citizenship

Friday, October 21, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This check was issued to Chauncey Williams for his assistance with the Crusade For Citizenship's voter registration campaign.

The Man Who Knows: General Westmoreland on Vietnam

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This editorial from a New York newspaper features statements from General William C. Westmoreland arguing for the public's support "about what is going on in Viet Nam, and why." Dr. King is among those listed as having opposing viewpoints towards the War.