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"CHINA"

A Manual for Direct Action

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.

MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

Letter from the Norway-American Association to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Ragnhild Galtung, director of the Norway-American Association, congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to speak during his upcoming visit to Oslo.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Letter from Jim Morton to Members of the UTC Board of Directors

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Jim Morton communicates the results of the executive committee conference call in preparation for a board member conference call at a later date. The Urban Training Center for Christian Mission is dedicated to community action and supports additional organizations. The training center is attempting to input a new training program and have appointed three staff positions.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

The Trinity

Dr. King analyzes Peter Abelard's argument on the interpretation of the Trinity as three attributes of one substance.

Telegram from Mary Gregory to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

In this telegram, Mary Gregory, President of the Frederick Douglass Association, informed Dr. King of their rededicated efforts to the movement, during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Larry M. Otter & Alan Aftanski to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

Mount Saint Mary's College's Young Democratic and Young Republican Clubs inform Dr. King of their preparation for the National Collegiate Primary, Choice '68. Dr. King has been named a candidate in the mock election, so the organizers request information about his views. They also tell Dr. King that a speaking engagement can be arranged if Dr. King's schedule brings him to the Maryland area.

References (Religion and Philosophy)

Dr. King cites three articles about Borden Parker Bowne. The first, “Personalism and the Influence of Bowne,” was written by Edgar S. Brightman and appeared in the journal The Personalist.

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC Pamphlet of Articles in Rebuttal of MLK's Critics

Andrew Young, the National Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, issued this pamphlet entitled "Does Martin Luther King, Jr. Have the Right? The Qualifications? The Duty? To Speak Out on Peace?" The pamphlet features several editorials written in defense of Dr. King that were published in the New York Times, Detroit Free Press, New York Post, and the Nation in April 1967. The pamphlet includes a statement saying the SCLC's primary focus is civil rights but they support Dr. King's right to speak his opinion regarding the Vietnam War.

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.

Letter from MLK to Alvin Jackson

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Dr. King advises Alvin Jackson to contact the NAACP Legal Defense Fund to obtain assistance.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

Letter from George F. Berlinger to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Mrs. George Berlinger of the Nathan Hofheimer Foundation, informs Dr. King that the organization will not be including the SCLC in their budget. The Nathan Hofheimer Foundation sought to improve the living conditions of the underprivileged.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Hugh D. Daugherty

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Dr. King, in this correspondence, took the opportunity to thank Mr. Hugh Daugherty for his contribution to SCLC. He apologized for the delay in response, due to receiving numerous mail, while at the same time being short staffed. Furthermore, the letter acknowledged that Mr. Daugherty's contribution assisted in helping SCLC staff focus on voter registration in the South and working in the ghettos of the North.

Letter from MLK to Crawford Johnson

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Crawford Johnson for an event hosted at the Palais des Sports in Paris, France.

Why We Chose Jail Rather Than Bail

Dr. King outlines eight principal reasons why he and others chose "jail rather than bail." One of the reasons was the idea to appeal to the conscience of their opponents.

Telegram from Robert L. Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Robert L. Lucas, the Chairman of the Chicago branch for the Congress On Racial Equality, invites Dr. King and his staff to return to Chicago, Illinois to assist in the struggle for quality integrated education.

Letter from Marion Arnold to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Marion Arnold, chairman of the Ecumenical Mission Committee of Broadway United Church of Christ, expresses thanks for the copy of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Request from Wm. James Stuart to MLK

Monday, June 14, 1965

Wm. James Stuart, a student, seeks the recommendation of books that helped Dr. King develop his own way of preaching.

Kant

Dr. King outlines principles of Kantian philosophy regarding morality and religion.

The Self

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's book "The Source of Human Good."

I Have A Dream

This is an excerpt of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, as delivered at the March on Washington. The moderator asks Marion Anderson to sing, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

Letter from Walter E. Fauntroy Regarding Dollars for Freedom Committee

Monday, March 26, 1962

Mr. Fauntroy informs readers of an upcoming fundraising rally entitled "Dollars for Freedom." Mr. Fauntroy serves as Chairman for the SCLC's Dollars for Freedom Committee.