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Letter from William Johnston to MLK

Monday, September 9, 1963

William Johnston of the Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa, writes Wyatt Tee Walker to inform him of an upcoming trip being made by Reverend Alphaeus H. Zulu in Atlanta. Johnston asks that the Reverend reserve a time to meet with Bishop Zulu during his short stay in the city.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman Robert T. Stafford writes to Dr. King acknowledging receipt of a recent request to support a particular bill. Stafford asserts that he will respect the majority rule of the District of Columbia and possibly revisit the petition at a later date.

Letter from Vivian S. Florence to MLK

Sunday, November 10, 1963

Ms. Florence informs Dr. King she has sent two other letters to the SCLC, both of which included contributions from the United Mine Workers of America. She expresses concern regarding mail tampering due to Dr. King's notoriety.

Rural Negros Start New Program

This press release from the SCLC informs the public that the self-help program of education for seasonal farm workers in Wilcox County, Alabama has officially opened. Along with the help of the federal office of Economic Opportunity, the SCLC wishes to create hope for neglected rural families. Also, to make this program a success, the antipoverty agency funded about $250 as well as a federal grant of $300 to help in financing this project.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Friday, May 10, 1963

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. James L. Fenner

Friday, July 19, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. James L. Fenner and the faculty members of P. S. 155 for their moral and financial support.

Letter from Pat Carter to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Dr. King receives a letter from Miss Pat Carter, the public relations director at Katz Radio, thanking him for his address regarding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Letter from MLK to Eliot Stadler

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $1000 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Dr. Eliot Stadler. In closing, the Reverend expresses interest in meeting Stadler with regard to potential aid during the summer months.

Letter from Christena Miscall to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1961

Christena Miscall, member of the Student Government Association at Saint Joseph's College, writes Dr. King requesting him to send a personal article for her college's famous persons' auction.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

SCLC Newsletter: January 1964

This SCLC Newsletter highlights Dr. King's honor as 'Man of Year' and discusses some of the major work he has done for blacks and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Lucy Amerson to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Lucy Amerson corresponds with Dr. King in reference to a $150 donation made by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. to SCLC. The donation was a portion of the funds raised through the Ebony Fashion Fair project.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on science and religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Letter from William Seabron to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Department of Agriculture Assistant to the Secretary, William M. Seabron writes Dr. King to enquire about fire insurance for "Negro citizens." He explains that a lack of fire insurance prevents citizens from improving existing homes or building new ones, following disaster. In addition, he requests any additional information Dr. King may find useful to the Department of Agriculture.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 9, 1965

This program for the Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association gives a detailed history of the organization's events from 1955 to 1965. "Highlights At A Glance" include: accounts of violence and community bombings, school integration, freedom rides, The Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the establishment of the SCLC. Photographs of leadership, churches, voter registration, and marches appear throughout. This document also shows Dr. King's handwritten notes, copies of related news articles, and the individual programs for each day of the Institute.

Man

Dr. King quotes a line from Homer's epic poem "The Iliad."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Nonviolent Leaders

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

Letter from L. Hayne To Whom it May Concern

L. Hayne requires Dr. King, and only Dr. King, to endorse a check before he will accept it.

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Wednesday, March 17, 1965

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

Letter from Moe Foner to a Friend

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Moe Foner is writing in regards to a new publication called, "Labor Voice For Peace." The issue mentioned covers the conference of labor leaders held in Chicago. Foner also asked for any comments concerning the publication.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 16, 1967

Clarence B. Jones writes Dora McDonald to inform her of his travel plans to Los Angeles, California.