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"CHRISTMAS ISLAND"

Letter from Moshe Decter to MLK

Tuesday, August 29, 1967

Moshe Decter requests Dr. King's signature on a statement for the Conference on the Status of Soviet Jews. The statement will appear under the sponsorship of the Conference.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King sends thanks to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein for a contribution made to the SCLC.

Telegram from MLK to Amsterdam News

Dr. King delivers an informative telegram to James Hicks, editor of Amsterdam News, regarding the current SCLC initiative to launch a civil rights campaign in Chicago, Illinois. The movement will direct its efforts towards school integration and eradicating the social ills that plague the Northern ghettos. Dr. King asserts "if the problems of Chicago, the Nation's second largest city, can be solved, they can be solved everywhere."

Telegram to MLK from 347 AFL-CIO Armours Lard Refinery Workers

The Local 347 of the AFL-CIO sent this Western Union Telegram to Dr. King as an expression of their hopes for his recovery, during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Godm (Micah)

Dr. King refers to the biblical book of Micah to write about Micah and Hosea's similar reference to the strength of the love of God.

Letter from Mr. Herbert. H. Fisher to MLK

Saturday, July 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher, President of the Chatham Avalon Park Community Council, provides an organized detailed account of community concerns. More specifically, he addresses various social and political issues regarding schools, housing, insufficient leadership, and government services.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Birthday Card to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Margaret, which includes a verse from the book of Matthew.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

References (Religion and Philosophy)

Dr. King cites three articles about Borden Parker Bowne. The first, “Personalism and the Influence of Bowne,” was written by Edgar S. Brightman and appeared in the journal The Personalist.

Letter from MLK to Mr. D.A. Edwards

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter was sent to Mr. Edwards expressing Dr. King's appreciation for his contribution to the Civil Rights cause.

The Pastor and His Reference Library

Here is "The Pastor and His Reference Library" by Edward C. Starr. Starr served as librarian at Bucknell. Dr. King more than likely used this resource to conduct research and organize citations while attending Crozer Theological Seminary in Upland, PA.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

Ed Clayton creates a brochure on behalf of SCLC. The brochure contains a message from Dr. King, pictures of SCLC members, a history of the organization and information regarding their initiatives.

Letter from MLK to Ernest McCullough

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the University of Toronto Progressive Conservative Association.

Telegram from John Conyers Jr. to MLK about a Meeting

In this telegram John Conyers, Jr. extends an invitation to Dr. King to attend a meeting for the discussion of black politics and related considerations. The meeting was to include Lerone Bennett, Julian Bond, Harry Belfonte, Richard Hatcher, Floyd McKissick, and Carl Stokes. Conyers also informs Dr. King of his itinerary and provides a number for him to be contacted.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

And There Was Love

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from Louise Andrews Sims to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Louise Andrews Sims asks Dr. King to consider providing assistance to the American Friend's Service Committee by setting aside one week for aspeaking engagement in October or November of 1963. Alternate dates could be in January through April of 1964.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

The Importance of Voting

Thursday, September 6, 1962

This transcript documents Dr. King's recorded statement intended to raise awareness of voting and voter registration.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.

Women's International League Conference

This pamphlet provides information regarding the upcoming Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Conference.

United States Department of Agriculture

Thursday, February 1, 1968

This document references Secretary Orville L. Freeman's speech regarding administrative programs to improve food assistance and nutrition. One of the programs that is discussed is the School Breakfast Program, which will make free breakfast available to thousands of children. Other programs are also mentioned and described as the document proceeds.

Strength to Love Royalty Statement

This is a detailed royalty statement from the German language edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Christliche Verlag.

The Birth of a New Nation

Dr. King compares the ongoing civil rights struggle in the United States to the Hebrews' Exodus from Egypt.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary for Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to students regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Palmberg suggests raising funds in an effort to further Dr. King's nonviolent endeavors in America. Palmberg wrote Dr. King invitations to speak on numerous occasions.

Schleiermacher (The Essence of Christianity)

Dr. King writes that Friedrich Schleiermacher describes the essence of Christianity as a belief in Jesus as the origin of the Christian faith and his work as that of redemption.

Shattered Dreams and Unfulfilled Hopes

Dr. King based this sermon on unfulfilled hopes and dreams. He focused on the story of the Apostle Paul and his wish to journey to Spain. Paul did eventually go to Spain but "as a prisoner and not as a free man." Dr. King told his congregation that they all faced unfulfilled dreams at some point in their lives.

Letter to MLK from Stanley Rice

Thursday, September 21, 1967

In this letter, Vice President Stanley Rice writes to Dr. King thanking him for subscribing to the United Business Service.