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"CHRISTMAS ISLAND"

Letter from Larry N. Boyd to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965

Larry N. Boyd, President of The United Piedmont Society, writes Dr. King expressing support for the SCLC's fight to achieve human rights for the Negroes throughout the South.

Agenda of the General Committee of the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations

Thursday, January 26, 1961

This document is an agenda and lists meeting minutes regarding the approval of actions, nominations, budget, and miscellaneous items for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

Request for Message form Amalgamate Laundry Workers Joint Board

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Louis Simon is writing to Dr. King requesting a message that he may include on the souvenir program for a concert the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint Board will be hosting.

Address By Senator Edward M. Kennedy to the SCLC

Monday, August 8, 1966

Senator Edward M. Kennedy highlights Dr. King's efforts during the Civil Rights Movement. He also expresses concerns about poverty, unemployment, nonviolence, segregation and integrity.

Order of Commitment

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

An Order of Commitment was issued for Dr. King on October 18, 1967 following a conviction for contempt of Court. The charge stemmed from a matter dating back to the 1963 Birmingham campaign. He was sentenced to five consecutive days in Jefferson County Jail, the famed location where "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was conceived.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

Letter to MLK from A. P. Swiderskas

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Mr. Swiderskas writes to Dr. King expressing his general hatered of the black race.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Robert Stock to MLK

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Robert Stock sends Dr. King a copy of a magazine called "Petroleum Today." The magazine offers their audience public information about the oil industry as well as human interests including education, art, and history.

Letter from Larry Schneider to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

Larry Schneider informs Dr. King that he is available for assistance with "planning and implementing" Dr. King's efforts. He also offers his thoughts on a wide variety of issues affecting the American Negro.

The Meaning of the Sit-Ins

This document describes the growing civil rights movement. It discusses the tactics various civil rights organizations are using and briefly touches on the tactics of opposition groups.

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Information about Poor People's Campaign

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Letter from MLK to Louis J. Braun

Tuesday, September 9, 1969

Dr. King agrees to serve on the Advisory Board of Campus Americans for Democratic Action. Dr. King explains that his ability to contribute to the Board will be limited, but he will assist when possible.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Dr. Brightman's views on philosophy . This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Joani Kalmers to MLK

Saturday, July 15, 1967

Joani Kalmers, a senior at Thiel College, requests information from Dr. King and the SCLC regarding her thesis topic "Christianity and the Negro."

Pathos and Hope

Saturday, March 3, 1962

Dr. King speaks about a trip to the Mississippi Delta where he first witnessed hope and pathos simultaneously.

Letter from Alfonzo Henderson to Afro-Americans

This letter from ARIDO (Afro-American Resource Industrial Development Organization) president Alfonzo Henderson outlines the organization's program goals.

Telegram from Dr. King to Senator Ernest Gruening

In this telegram to Senator Ernest Gruening, Dr. King expressed his happiness to serve as sponsor of a peace concert of the Arts that was held at Lincoln Center, January 21, 1968.

Remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School

Tuesday, March 8, 1960

Harris Wofford, Jr. gives these remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School on March 8, 1960. Wofford has several ties with Dr. King in cases such as arranging a trip to India, helping to write "Stride Toward Freedom," and negotiating with Senator Kennedy and Vice-President Nixon during the 1960 presidential campaign. In addition, Wofford was the Special Assistant for Civil Rights under U. S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

Augustine's Doctrine of Evil

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.

Beyond Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Comment On Proposed Resolution: Ending Racism in the Democratic Party

Friday, October 9, 1964

On October 9th, 1964, the Democratic National Convention adopted a resolution ending racial discrimination in Party membership.

The Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storthing

Thursday, January 30, 1964

The members of the Swedish Parliament honors Dr. King for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. The Parliament expounds on the prosperous and revolutionary efforts of Dr. King and encourages him to continue the methodology of nonviolence introduced by Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. King is further highlighted for his works in the United States and his contributions to eradicate racial discrimination.

Handwritten Notes Individuality and Participation

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on individuality and participation. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Mr. W David Angus

Wednesday, February 12, 1964

Dr. King is responding to the invitation given by W. David Angus. He regrettably informs Angus that due to his overcrowded schedule, he is unable to speak in Montreal. He suggests Reverend Ralph Abernathy as a more than adequate alternative to speak.

Excerpt: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" 1967

Sunday, July 2, 1967

The "Quote" publication, from Indianapolis, issued a review of Dr. King's last book. Under the heading, "Book Review in Quotes", a preview of 10 quotations from "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" are listed, in this document. Black power, nonviolence and other subject matters are highlighted in the quotations. Dr. King's book was published and released in 1967.