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Telegram from Leroy B. Allen to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

The president of Cheyney State College invites Dr. King to deliver the Founder's Day Address any day in November of 1967.

Response to Reasons Why African Americans Should Boycott Whitey's Olympics

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
LIBERIA, Chicago, IL

The writer responds to an article in The Post on why African Americans should boycott the Olympics. He believes that Negroes should return to Africa or form their own community in the US separate from whites. God did not intend whites and Negroes to live together, the author maintains, or would have made them the same color. Negroes should take responsibility for their own condition rather than blaming whites. test

The Burning Truth in the South

New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Montgomery, AL

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Letter from Colin W. Bell to MLK

Tuesday, May 17, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Colin W. Bell invites Dr. King to deliver a lecture during the anniversary activities of the American Friends Service Committee. This letter also includes Dora McDonald's shorthand in red ink.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Mr. Shriver to offer assistance to farmers who have been treated unfairly.

Letter from Mrs. Fenner to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Fenner, on behalf of the Faculty of P. S. 155, sends a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for use in the fight for African American Civil Rights.

Letter from Victor Carter to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
California (CA)

Victor Carter writes a letter of support to Dr. King on behalf of he and his wife. The Carters are unable to attend the Selma to Montgomery march but enclose a check to aid in the civil right struggle.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Blicksilver

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Blicksilver for his contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges the impact of such support in improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Hawaii (HI), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Pride of Achievement

Dr. King quotes II Chronicles 26:15 regarding King Uzziah and cites Ralph Sockman’s “The Higher Happiness.”

Temporary Injunction Filed Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, April 10, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This is a legal document for a temporary injunction filed by the city of Birmingham against Wyatt Tee Walker.

Rio Grande Farm Workers Bulletin

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
Texas (TX)

This bulletin describes the difficulty that migrant farm laborers have encountered forming organizations to improve economic conditions.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

JAMAICA

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), South Africa, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Roy Wilkins sends a message of warm wishes on behalf of the NAACP to Dr. King while he is serving a sentence at the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Letter from Gaye Breitel to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY

Gaye Breitel, a ten year old from New York, writes Dr. King to request an autographed photo or book with a recent picture.

Letter from MLK to Senator Abraham Ribicoff

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Abraham Ribicoff's efforts in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

What is The OIC Institute?

Philadelphia, PA

The Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) Institute was founded in 1964 by Reverend Leon H. Sullivan in response to public demand for a centralized resource for economic and social progress. This brochure outlines the program's history, principles, and current executive leaders.

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Harry Wachtel gives Dr. King a monetary birthday gift that he tells Dr. King to use on a much needed vacation.

Presidential Invitation to White House Luncheon

Tuesday, June 5, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., CYPRUS

President Kennedy invites Dr. King to attend a White House Luncheon on the occasion of the visit of Archbishop Makarios, the President of the Republic of Cyprus.

Telegram from Harold Willens to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 10, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

Mr. Willens forwards a telegram to Dora McDonald that he had previously sent to Andrew Young. Willens invited Ralph D. Abernathy to be a guest on "Issues and Answers." Abernathy initially declined the invitation only later to accept, which lead Willens to inform him of the potential "impact and consequences."

Letter from Robert Starbuck to the SCLC

Wednesday, May 19, 1965
Berlin, Germany, GERMANY, Atlanta, GA

Robert Starbuck encloses a contribution to the SCLC on behalf of supporters from Berlin, Germany. Starbuck has affiliations with many individuals tied to the American Civil Rights Movement and believes that it is imperative to contribute to the cause.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King agrees that the United Civil Rights Leadership Council should be dissolved.

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Missouri (MO), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes and comments on Shakespeare's "Henry V."

Syllabus for the History of Christianity

FRANCE, GERMANY, SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document is a course syllabus for the History of Christianity.

Letter from the Frink Family to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL)

Father and husband John Frink, sends a $200 donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was made possible by not getting anyone any Christmas gifts. The author writes of a future intent to contribute physical aid to the organization in their hometown of Florida. In closing, Frink requests information regarding sponsorship of a needy family for the purpose of teaching his children how to be of service to others.