The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:

Letter from Sam Jones to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Florida (FL), Jacksonville, FL

In this letter, dated January 11, 1968, Sam Jones expresses his disappointment in Dr. King for not acknowledging his letters. Jones wrote several letters to King asking for assistance in the struggle to restrain the Florida State Legislature's "Lily White" body from writing a new State Constitution.

Letter from Robert Carr to MLK

This note from Robert Carr is attached to a copy of the "Report of President Truman's Committee on Civil Rights," sent to Dr. King as a gift.


This note card seems to reflect some of Dr. King's personal insights on Jesus. It belongs to a series of note cards devoted to the topic of Jesus.

Letter from L. Hayne To Whom it May Concern

L. Hayne requires Dr. King, and only Dr. King, to endorse a check before he will accept it.

Norwegian Peace Initiative

Friday, January 6, 1967
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

Five Norwegians concerned about the Vietnam conflict propose that winners of the Nobel Peace Prize form a negotiating delegation to visit the US and Hanoi governments.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Thursday, February 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

Letter from MLK to R. B. Taylor

Wednesday, October 13, 1965
Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King thanks Dr. R. B. Taylor for his generous contribution to the SCLC. King discusses how the funds are allocated to assist with voter registration, education and finding jobs for blacks.


Dr. King quotes Jonathan Swift’s scathing assessment of man.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Congratulations to MLK from Michael Engel

Saturday, December 19, 1964
Michigan (MI)

In this letter dated December 19, 1964, Michael Engel sends his congratulations to Dr.King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize. He also asks for a picture of Dr.King for his scrapbook.

Chicago Freedom Rally

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.

The Ben Bella Conversation

ALGERIA, CUBA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King summarizes his recent two-hour meeting with Premier Ahmed Ben Bella of the newly-formed Algerian Republic. He mentions that Ben Bella was intimately familiar with the details of the civil rights movement and repeatedly said or inferred that “we are brothers.” King states that “the battle of the Algerians against colonialism and the battle of the Negro against segregation is a common struggle.” There are international implications for the US if it doesn’t solve its human rights problem: the nation will become a second-rate power in the world.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter from Clifford P. Case to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL)

Senator Clifford P. Case, U. S. Senator from New Jersey, writes Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Act being passed. Case encloses a copy of the bill as it passed, with an explanation of "the major changes from the House version."

Letter from Elaine Haley to Senator George Murphy

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM, California (CA)

Elaine Haley sends a letter to Senator George Murphy discussing Dr. King's views on riots in relation to ending the Vietnam War.

Letter from Sture Stiernlof to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA

Arbetet magazine's foreign editor, Sture Stiernlof, requests an interview with Dr. King for a "series of articles about the negro movement" that will be published in Sweden's most popular magazine, "Vi," as well as in Arbetet. Additionally, Stiernlof will use the materials for a book.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Dynamic Form Applied to God

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's Systematic Theology on the difference in applying the dynamic form to God versus applying it to man.

The New York Herald Tribune Articles Concerning Vietnam

Friday, November 23, 1962

These copies of several news articles denounce United States military involvement in the Vietnam War.
The New York Herald Tribune claims the there is no formal program to inform the public about what is happening in Vietnam.
The Nation claims that the United States Army is being used to bolster a brutal dictatorship in an undeclared war.
The Washington Star carried an Associated Press report on children with napalm burns.

Letter from Dr. Herman Klugman

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. Herman Klugman, Dr. King's German-language tutor at Boston University, offers his congratulations on the coveted Nobel Peace Prize. He states that, as a Jew whose people experienced Nazi persecution, he has watched the "Gleichberechtigung" (equal rights) struggle with deep emotion.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

Thursday, May 16, 1963
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks singer-actress Eartha Kitt for her generous support and deep concern for the people of Birmingham, Alabama, and elsewhere in the South. He extends his appreciation to those in the Harlem Apollo Theatre who have contributed in response to her example.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Letter from Linda Frawley to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

Linda Frawley, the campus coordinator for Suffolk University, requests any "pseudo-campaign" materials that Dr. King may be able to send. The materials are to be used in the National Intercollegiate Presidential Primary, sponsored by Time Magazine.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. N. W. Christian

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA)

Dora McDonald writes Mr. Christian on Dr. King's behalf. She acknowledges his disagreement with Dr. King's philosophy and refers him to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for answers to his questions.

Holiday Card from the McKinneys

Reverend S. Berry McKinney, his wife and daughter sent Dr. King this holiday card.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York (NY)

J.Campe encloses payment from The Critic for "Where Do We Go From Here" permission fees.

Handwritten notes on the Personality of God

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on personality of God. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Proposed Resolution on East-West Relations


The Council for Christian Social Action of the United Church of Christ, citing President Johnson's State of the Union statement that he hopes to end the Cold War, indicates its support of government efforts to create a dialogue with the Soviet Union and other Eastern European countries. The Council asks that the Senate ratify the outer space treaty and the U.S.-Soviet consular convention and that Congress approve an East-West trade bill and lifting restrictions on the Food for Peace program.

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL)

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.