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God

Dr. King references the book of Job by discussing the immense and power of God.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Letter from Deacon Willie McClinek to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Deacon Willie McClinek invites Dr. King, on behalf of the Sensational Heavenly Dew Drops and The Stars of Faith gospel singers, to make an appearance at their play entitled "Master, I Want To Live" in Philadelphia.

Letter from Leonard Dorsey to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Leonard Dorsey requests Dr. King begin teaching the subject of Divine Retribution.

Letter from Dr. Earl C. Jackson, Sr. to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Earl Jackson writes Dr. King requesting feedback regarding his upcoming speaking engagement as one of three keynote speakers during a large conference in Delaware.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr.

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King extended his appreciation to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr. for the letter and copy of Mr. Wood's speech given on the Demonstration Cities Program.

God

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the ethics of God. According to the scriptures God is just and fair and demands "justice and sacrifice."

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

Letter from H. D. Everett to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

A proposition letter expressing an economic idea to establish business enterprises owned and operated by negroes.

Letter from Frank J. Pastor to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from Frank Pastor was written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Ralph Bunch Cooke's High School Report Card

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

This document is Ralph Bunch Cooke's report card reflecting his four years as a student at North Warren High School in Smiths Grove, Kentucky.

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

Letter from Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre to MLK

Sunday, November 3, 1963

Elsa McIntyre writes to Dr. King to seek information on how to contribute to his organization. Mrs. McIntyre was moved by Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and inquires about obtaining a copy.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Metaphysics

Dr. King notes an insight from American psychologist and philosopher William James regarding metaphysics.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Sermon Text (Habakkuk)

Dr. King examines Habakkuk chapter 1, verses 2 through 4 to discuss whether the inequalities of life are justification to question God.

Letter from Helen Paul to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Helen Paul of Follett Publishing thanks Ms. McDonald for informing Dr. King of her request to publish several of his speeches.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Salvation

Dr. King records New Testament verses related to salvation.

Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's definition of the philosophy of religion. Brightman argues that the rational interpretation and comparison of religion is the basis for the philosophy of religion.

Letter from Jimmie Johnson to MLK

Jimmie Johnson writes to Dr. King to say that while he is a Negro, he does not believe in integration. Johnson does not think there will ever be enough jobs in America for Negroes, and therefore argues for segregation. He asks Dr. King to share this view in his upcoming meeting with President Johnson.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Tuesday, May 25, 1965

This letter to Dr.King from a supporter emphasizes the need for reform in the SCLC. Particularly with its writings. He tells Dr.King the need for editing grammatical errors on SCLC literature. He believes he has a workable plan to make changes that would better serve Dr.King and the movement.

Letter from Christopher Pearce to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Mr. Pearce, a young English filmmaker, desiring to produce a documentary on Dr. King, requests permission to follow him about Washington, D. C. during his upcoming visit.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Schrag

Dr. King cites Oswald O. Schrag’s article “The Main Types of Existentialism” that appeared in Religion in Life, winter 1953-54.

Vietnam and Beyond

This program for the Ecumenical and Community Conference held at the Thornfield Conference Center in Cazenovia, New York, highlights leaders from across the globe invited to attend the conference. These leaders were invited to support the efforts in Vietnam and assess policies regarding the country.