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"CONGO / ZAIRE"

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King defending President Johnson regarding his decisions for the Civil Rights Movement and African-Americans.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary of Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to Turku students during his upcoming visit to the region.

Letter from N. M. Nel to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

N. M. Nel writes to inform Dr. King that his visa application for South Africa has been denied.

Letter from Mrs. Bonnie Cohen to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Bonnie Cohen, a senior at Eastern Michigan University, writes to Rev. Abernathy requesting his thoughts on the problem of "crime in the streets."

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Thursday, June 30, 1966

This royalty statement from Harper and Row, Publishers Incorporated, details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" for the six month period ending June 30, 1966.

Letter from Annie Grace to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Thirteen-year-old Annie G. Miller expresses her admiration for Dr. King.

Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie Writes to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967

Johan Keijser, writing for the Board of the Foundation of Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie, sends a letter to Dr. King. It includes a list of names of those whom the group has invited to form a committee of support for their efforts in creating a "provisional world government." The list includes artists, intellectuals, national government leaders, and religious leaders from all over the world. Remarkably, it also includes "father of the hydrogen bomb" Edward Teller.

Letter from Edwin Allaire to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

The writer, who identifies himself as a professor at the University of Michigan, encourages Dr. King to announce his candidacy for the Presidency.

Letter from Anonymous Writer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

The author of this letter copies an article "Communists Meet the Church," published by the San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle, to support his accusations of cooperation between the Catholic Church and Communists.

Letter from Henry N. Flynt, Jr. to MLK

Sunday, October 15, 1967

Henry N. Flynt expresses his appreciation for a copy of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here" and compliments Dr. King on the quality of the book.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

Letter from Yousuf Karsh to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Yousuf Karsh congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize Award. In addition, Mr. Karsh informs Dr. King that his wife attended Antioch College at the same time as Mrs. King.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Campbell to MLK

Monday, August 24, 1964

The Philadelphia District of The Methodist Youth Fellowship asks Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an upcoming freedom rally.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Agenda for the SCLC State and Local Leaders

Friday, February 2, 1962

This agenda outlines several topics discussed for the Southwide Meeting of State and Local Leaders. Dr. King, the President of the SCLC, spoke on SCLC's 'People to People' Program.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

The SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO) issues a program addressing the goals of the Chicago Freedom Movement. The Chicago Freedom Movement is composed of a coalition of organizations who have decided to eradicate slums, ghettos and racism from the city.

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This paper states that segregation is both unconstitutional and immoral. It calls for a face-to-face meeting with the Albany, Georgia City Commission to discuss disposition of cases against the Albany Movement and a commitment to the First Amendment right of peaceful protest; clarification of the city’s position on the recent Interstate Commerce Commission ruling and desegregation of the city’s buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to recommend a timetable for desegregating lunch counters, the library, schools, and parks.

King Finds New Target

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Mr. Wachtel informs Dr. King that a large donation made by Mrs. Ann Farnsworth is now available. Wachtel then asks Dr. King who is to send the acknowledgment.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Letter from Harry J. Cargas to MLK Regarding The Queen's Work

Tuesday, November 19, 1963

The editor of "The Queen's Work," a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society, sends Dr. King a copy of the December issue. The editor informs Dr. King that the magazine goes out to twenty thousand Catholic high school students around the nation, and this issue's focus on interracial justice should interest Dr. King.

Letter from Wyatt Walker to Hy Resnick

Friday, December 8, 1961

On behalf of Dr. King, Wyatt Walker thanks Hy Resnick and the Mount Vernon YM & YWHA for their efforts to raise money to aid the civil rights movement. He then suggests a number of entertainers that might be useful through Harry Belafonte's associations.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Robert Kennedy writes to Dr. King to express his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the strive to preserve the basic values of freedom and dignity throughout the world. Lastly, Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a series of speeches he made in January and wish to hear Dr. King's reactions to them.

Letter from Sevy Powell to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

evy Powell expresses her view that President Johnson has done more for Negroes than President Kennedy did and Robert Kennedy or Sen. Eugene McCarthy can do because of his ability to influence Congress.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

In this letter, Sargent Shriver discusses the success of the Upward Bound program at Morehouse College. Upward Bound is a program as part of the national war against poverty.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter from Great St. Mary's

Monday, January 18, 1965

Hugh Montefiore informs Dr. King that he is awaiting a response to an earlier letter. Montefiore had hoped that Dr. King could preach in an effort to "fix up" some local ministers.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.