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MLK Sermon About Courage and Cowardice

The document is a single draft page from Dr. King's larger work "Strength to Love," with annotations handwritten by Dr. King. On this page, he discusses courage and self-affirmation.


Dr. King quotes Charles Darwin's "The Origin of Species."

Letter from Trude B. Feldman to Mrs. King

In this letter Trude Feldman sends Mrs. King a copy of a "piece" on Sammy Davis from "Ebony" and asks that it be returned after review.


Dr. King quotes Charles Summer, stating that being "children of a common Father" is a "more sacred bond" than being a citizen.

Letter from Rev. Thurman Goodman to MLK

In this letter, Mr. Goodman writes Dr. King inquiring about a position in a new organization in Oakland, CA that works to uplift the black race.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Thomson, a representative of the Canadian Friends' Service Committee, invites Dr. King to participate in a week-long conference held in Toronto, Ontario. The event will consist of diplomats from all over the world.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crosby to MLK

Sunday, March 8, 1964

The Crosby family of Massachusetts encloses a check to Dr. King to aid in the fight for equality. Mrs. Crosby notes that her husband was the first individual to employ a Negro teacher at Boston University, where Dr. King received his PhD in systematic theology.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964

Helga Gulbrandsen responds to a previous letter from Dr. King and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Gulbrandsen expresses regret concerning the Reverend's unavailability for a lecture in the Oslo Group.

Letter from Jean Ward Wolff to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

Jean Ward Wolff expresses her concern about Dr. King turning his back on truth and justice in the form of supporting Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Ned French to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

A high school student requests the political opinions of several famous individuals concerning the national issues and potential candidates of the 1968 presidential election.

Raphael Gould Thanks MLK For Support

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Gould thanks Dr. King for his letter of support to the Clergymen's Emergency Committee in Vietnam. Gould further approves of King's dialogue printed in Playboy Magazine and encourages him to go on late night TV interview shows to reach a larger population of Americans.

Letter from Illinois High School Student Beth Allen to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

High school student Beth Allen writes Dr. King inquiring about how she can contribute to the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.

Letter from Norma Perez to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Norma Perez sends her condolences to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Royalty Statement: Why We Can't Wait

Monday, April 3, 1967

This royalty statement details Dr. King's earnings for the book "Why We Can't Wait" over a six month period.

Letter from MLK to Melvin Grussing Regarding a Contribution

Monday, February 26, 1968

Dr. King writes to express gratitude for the generous contribution of $126 to the SCLC. He conveys that such support enables SCLC to continue programs to complete the task of voter registration in the South.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Answer to a Perplexing Question

"Why Could Not We Cast Him Out?" is a chapter in Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." In this chapter, Dr. King discusses the methods in which man attempts to deal with evil in the world. Two methodologies are distinguished. The first concerns man's independent attempt to remove evil and the second stems from man's ideology of making God solely responsible for eliminating evil. Dr. King concludes that neither method is successful and that man has to find a medium between the two.

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Correspondence - Contribution Thank-You Letter from MLK to Chris Folcker 8/16/66

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

In this document Dr. King expresses great appreciation for the Swedish Consul General's donation of $100,000. The amount of this contribution would underscore that Sweden's commitment to Dr. King's work and the civil rights movement in general did not stop at the proverbial edge of the Nobel Peace Prize's water.

Letter from the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Bolennart Andersson, President of the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden, sends a congratulatory letter and an invitation to Dr. King to speak to their student union.

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

A. Philip Randolph writes Dr. King requesting that he join as a sponsor in the campaign to decrease customers of the two chief banks supporting apartheid in South Africa.

Letter from J. Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

J. Smith states that Dr. King is a hypocrite who will be punished by God. Smith believes Dr. King to be a Communist agitator who is undeserving of the Nobel Peace Prize. Smith concludes by warning Dr. King to cease his movement or he will be plagued with death just like John F. Kennedy.

The Committee of Responsibility Thanks Coretta Scott King

Wednesday, January 25, 1967

Herbert L. Needleman, Chairman of The Committee of Responsibility, expresses his appreciation for Mrs. King's sponsorship of the program. He assures her that the response received regarding the program launch has been of great size.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Letter from Jessie Jackson to C. L. Franklin

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

Reverend Jessie Jackson writes this letter to Reverend C. L. Franklin of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Jackson expresses his gratitude for Franklin's suggestions and assistance during a recent stay in Detroit. He also appreciates the solidarity exhibited towards the SCLC.

Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

Telegram from Rev. T. A. Borders to Mrs. King

Monday, May 13, 1968

Rev. Borders conveys his prayers to Mrs. King, on behalf of the First Community Baptist Church.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes St. Irenaeus of Lyons.