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Letter from A High School Student

A white high school student writes Dr. King to encourage the continuation of demonstrations to free the Negro people.

Letter from James McLaurin to MLK and Andrew Young

Tuesday, March 15, 1966
Chicago, IL

James McLaurin asks Dr. King to spend part of a day with the students and faculty at Garrett. The topic that they want Dr. King to speak about is the seminary's role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Walter Gibson to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Gibson writes to Dr. King concerning his political position on the Vietnam War. He believes that the war is a just war because the end is to help the South Vietnamese halt the spread of communism.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

MLK's Statement to SCLC Describing SCOPE

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Louisville, KY, Memphis, TN, Nashville, TN

In this statement, Dr. King describes the Summer Community Organization and Political Education (SCOPE), an initiative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Its goals are to train local leaders, inform the public, and register individuals to vote.

Education

Dr. King outlines his views on education.

List of Persons Invited to the Advisory Board for World Government

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
BRAZIL, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, GREECE, CONGO / ZAIRE

This document lists seven international figures who were invited to take a seat on the Advisory Board for World Government.

Project Concern Pamphlet

HONG KONG, Kentucky (KY), California (CA), MEXICO

This Pamphlet, made by Project Concern, discusses the efforts taken to help the impoverished and sick.

Nonviolence

Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from James H. Bowman to Rev. Andrew J. Young

Saturday, July 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Columbus, OH, Cleveland, OH

James H. Bowman writes to Rev. Young requesting for Mr. Ralph Henry to be stationed by SCLC on the near west side of Chicago.

Letter from Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath, President of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, thanks Dr. King for speaking out not only against the Vietnam War, but also in support of helping the poor. Rabbi Eisendrath tells Dr. King that he has"ignited the conscience of America, as no other man, on the struggle for racial justice."

Letter from Sheldon L. Gutman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
United Nations, Columbia Broadcasting System, inc., Southern Christian Leadership Conference, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Arizona (AZ), FRANCE, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, United Nations, Columbia Broadcasting System, inc., Southern Christian Leadership Conference, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Arizona (AZ), FRANCE, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, THAILAND, SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA, JAPAN, GREECE, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., CYPRUS

Sheldon L. Gutman writes Dr. King urging him to utilize his prominence by consistently speaking out about the issues of the world. Gutman also expresses concern regarding America's potential retaliation to China detonating a hydrogen bomb.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Martin J. Morand, Vice-President of the Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg, inquires about Dr. King's availability to serve as a guest speaker at a late 1964 meeting in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Letter to Mrs. King from Patricia Pleas

Friday, April 5, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

This letter of condolence originates from East Orange, NJ, and is addressed to Mrs. King. The letter was written the day, following Dr. King's assassination, and its receipt stamp date would suggest the vast volume of mail, in the aftermath of his death.

I Sat Where They Sat Sermon Outline

This sermon draft of Dr. King's was never delivered, but focuses on the Christian themes of empathy and understanding. Dr. King claims that "if the white man was closer to the Negro he would... ...understand them" better.

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegelian Philosophy regarding the ideal German State.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

California (CA)

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Joan Daves Informs MLK of a Proposal to Print the Speech from the March on Washington

Friday, October 23, 1964
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Washington (WA)

Joan Daves negotiates with John Avirgan on the royalty percentage for the rights to sale hand-lettered versions of the Speech from the March on Washington.

Statement by MLK re Citizen Diplomacy

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
VIETNAM, CHINA

Dr. King releases a statement that he was considering communicating by mail with the "major powers" involved in the Vietnam conflict. However; he now believes that with the changing factors of certain groups involved in the conflict, his proposed communication is no longer needed.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, July 13, 1962
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Dept. of Justice, responds to Dr. King's telegram requesting a Federal investigation concerning an incident involving Mr. Toomes Clendon and Sheriff W. E. Hammond. In closing, Marshall assures the Reverend that appropriate action will be taken should a violation be involved.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Nashville, TN, Chicago, IL, Nebraska (NE)

H.D. Bollinger requests Dr. King's appearance at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference at the Methodist Student Movement in Nebraska. Mr. Bollinger informs Dr. King that the students are "very anxious" to have him as a principle speaker. The theme of the conference will be "The Church in the World." The church is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and ensures him that they will provide an honorarium if he were to accept this speaking engagement.

Telegram from Leslie Dewart to MLK

Monday, July 19, 1965
CANADA

On behalf of The International Teach-in Committee, Professor Dewart invites Dr. King to participate teach-in in Toronto.

Letter from Howard R. Neville to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

Michigan State provost, Howard Neville, tells Dr. King that Dr. Robert Green is available for a one year leave of absence for the Neighborhood Leader Training Program.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Dr. Oswald Spengler regarding his ideology of immortality. According to Spengler, history holds no permanent value. King states "If such a philosophy of history is right there would be no reason to desire continued existence...immortality would have no meaning."

Letter from Jagdish Bhatt to MLK

Tuesday, November 9, 1965
Johannesburg, South Africa

South African resident Jagdish Bhatt writes Dr. King requesting an autograph picture of Dr. King. Bhatt notes that he has also collected other forms of memorabilia of Dr. King such as speeches and various recordings.

Letter from Robert S. Browne to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Robert S. Browne informs Dr. King that he disagrees with the editor the New York Times. Browne conveys his support to Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from Sushil Joseph to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963
Denver, CO, Atlanta, GA, INDIA

Sushil Joseph, a student at the University of Denver, informs Dr. King of a term paper he is writing on the subject of "Church and the Race Relations." Joseph would like Dr. King to answer one of the questions he enclosed with this letter to aid him with his paper.

Telegram from the Montgomery Improvement Association to Leaders of Birmingham

Thursday, May 9, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

The Montgomery Improvement Association office staff sends Dr. King, Rev. Shuttlesworth, Rev. Abernathy and other Birmingham civil rights leaders words of encouragement.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.