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Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

SCLC Newsletter: Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany

In this newsletter, SCLC announces integration in Albany, GA and believes that the city will soon face the legal death of segregation. They also inform readers of the arrest of SCLC Petersburg President, David Gunter.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

Letter from Oakleigh Ross Bush to MLK

Saturday, June 25, 1966

Oakleigh Ross Bush discusses the significance of author Joel Candler Harris with Dr. King. Bush also tells Dr. King about a book of Harris' work, which Bush edited. Bush currently is trying to get the book published, but needs a forward written by "an eminent American Negro" in order for publishers to accept the manuscript.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Education Heritage

Friday, March 13, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the Educational Heritage Company has come to an arrangement about distributing "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." The letter goes on to say that Educational Heritage will pay a guarantee of $2500 against a royalty of 42 cent per copy sold.

Letter from Dora McDonald to J. Sackmann

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

Ms. McDonald invites Sackmann's students on behalf of Dr. King to visit his office and speak with his executives.

Letter from the Poor People's Committee in Grenada, Mississippi

Friday, January 19, 1968

The Poor People's Committee of the Grenada Freedom Movement writes to Dr. King requesting help in securing jobs and adequate education.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.


Dr. King writes that Isaiah 1:18-20 indicates that sacrifices are not needed to be saved from sin; willingness and obedience are the way to be saved.

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Saturday, February 19, 1966

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

Letter from Norman Thomas to the New York Times Editor

Monday, August 28, 1967

Norman Thomas cites an excerpt from a story by Peter Khiss entitled "Rowan Terms Dr. King's Stand on War a Peril to Rights Gains." Mr. Thomas asserts that the statement is incorrect and that he whole "heartily" applauds Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Actual Occasions

Dr. King quotes philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's "Religion in the Making." He interprets the phases in events and how such events are perceived.

Letter from Major E. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Rev. Major Smith briefly informs Dr. King of the support he has given Dr. King's program and asks him to reconsider the Alabama Boycott. He explains that he does not agree with this decision and states that this may cost him some supporters.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Congratulations from Darien Public Schools Superintendent to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

Mr. Coffin congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Coffin also provides Dr. King with information on the initiatives of the Darien Public Schools to further progress the civil rights movement.

Letter from Joe Johnson and Lewis Black to Robert Swann

Members of the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association send this letter of appreciation to the International Independence Institute.

Get Well Letter from William H. Allen, M.D.

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

William H. Allen, M.D. sent this letter to Dr. King expressing sympathy to Dr. King, for his nearly fatal stabbing. Dr. Allen, further into the letter, encouraged Dr. King to continue to pray in order to eliminate evil in the world and hoped he will remain protected to continue his mission for freedom.

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."

Telegram from MLK to Katie B. Whickham

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Dr. King welcomes Mrs. Whickham and the National Beauty Culturist League to Atlanta. He also thanks Mrs. Whickham for the support that her organizations has given to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

The Trinity

Dr. King analyzes Peter Abelard's argument on the interpretation of the Trinity as three attributes of one substance.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Board Members and Executive Staff

Friday, January 6, 1967

Rev. Ralph Abernathy informs the board members and executive staff of SCLC that Dr. King is taking a leave of absence for two months to write his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" During Dr. King's absence, Rev. Abernathy took over the activities of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Dr. King responds to Ms. Young's previous letter that discussed the difficulty of engaging people in voter registration efforts.


Dr. King quotes a statement from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the country's "historic situation in which the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

Scientific Method (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes Henry P. Van Dusen’s article “How Do We Know?” from The Christian Century on the scientific method as central to Henry Nelson Wieman’s thinking. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”


Dr. King quotes Soren Kierkegaard's "Einübung im Christentum" ["Practice in Christianity"].

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee is having an event with Dr. King as their guest speaker and special musical performances by artist such as Mahalia Jackson.

Letter from Alfred Hearin to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Alfred Hearin expresses to Dr. King that he admires him and that he has faith in his ability to help mankind. He then asks Dr. King to send him a handwritten letter and a photograph of himself for his collection.