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Letter from MLK to Dorothy O. Bucklin

Thursday, December 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Wisconsin (WI)

Dr. King graciously declines Mrs. Bucklin's invitation to speak in Green Lake, Wisconsin under the "auspices" of the American Baptist Convention. Mrs. Bucklin serves as Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

New York, NY, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

MLK Outline of Biblical Texts

Dr. King outlines the Old Testament biblical book of Samuel and records information regarding the lives of Saul and David.

Letter from William Reynolds to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA

Mr. Reynolds writes Dr. King requesting to use quotations from his April 5th speech to encourage a higher attendance at future vigils in the Bay Area.

Letter from The Canadian Council of Christians and Jews to MLK

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
CANADA

National Executive Director Richard Jones invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto during the celebration of Canada's centennial birthday. Jones describes current racial relations and acknowledges that the centennial events could be used to spur "advances toward complete equality."

Rejection Letter from MLK to Areatha G. Bailey Regarding the Freedom Fund Dinner

Wednesday, March 13, 1968
Michigan (MI)

In this letter, Dr. King informs Areatha G. Bailey that he will not be able to attend the Freedom Fund Dinner.

SCLC Report of the Director

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA)

This document contains a six month SCLC Semi-Annual Report. The SCLC reports on their accomplishments in the areas of social action, fundraising, education, legal defense, etc. This document discusses the Virginia Christian Leadership Conference, the SCLC Leadership Training Program, and the Citizens Voter Registration Drive. Also included is a list of recommendations for the SCLC staff.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Letter from Andrew Bell III and Fred Fechheimer to MLK

Wednesday, June 30, 1965
ETHIOPIA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

The "Americans in Ethiopia Who Support Civil Rights in the United States" committee sends its support and a monetary contribution to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Existentialism Defined

Dr. King provides a descriptive definition of the word Existentialism, based in part on the works of Russian religious and philosophical leader Nikolai Berdyaev.

Protest Against MLK Flyer

Chicago, IL, CHINA

This flyer accuses Dr. King of being a traitor and calls for a protest rally when he appears at Grosse Pointe High School in Detroit

Letter from Helen Knox to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA), New York (NY)

Mrs. Knox acknowledges receipt of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" and briefly discloses details of her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement in Harlem.

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

Thursday, October 27, 1966
New York (NY), VIETNAM, CANADA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

Wednesday, June 17, 1959
Washington, D.C.

The Executive Director, Jacob Seidenberg, writes to Participants of the Religious Leaders Conference to send them a roster of people who have attended similar events. These people may be selected to help with the Conference on May 11, 1959.

Letter from Dixie to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dixie, a white man and segregationist, states in his letter to Dr. King that it has taken the Whites only a few weeks to get segregation rolling again.

Aristotle

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Aristotelian philosophy.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968
Detroit, MI, Illinois (IL)

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Montgomery, AL, CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Georgia (GA), Detroit, MI, Geneva, Switzerland, FRANCE, THAILAND, GUATEMALA, COLOMBIA, PERU, VENEZUELA

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964
New York (NY), HUNGARY

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Coretta Scott King to the Family of Dr. Thomas Merton

Tuesday, December 17, 1968
Louisville, KY

Mrs. Coretta Scott King writes to the family of Dr. Thomas Merton expressing her condolences regarding his death. She explains that the tribute Dr. Merton paid to her late husband will never be forgotten and urges the family to remember that the spiritual bonds that exist between a family is eternal.

Revelation Baptist Church Program for "A Knock at Midnight"

Sunday, September 27, 1964
Cincinnati, OH, Birmingham, AL

This program outlines the Revelation Baptist Church Sunday Worship Service on September 27, 1964. The booklet lists Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth, co-founder of the SCLC, as the church's presiding minister. On this occasion, Dr. King addressed the congregation from the pulpit with the sermon "A Knock at Midnight," which had been published the year before. Dr. King's handwritten notes seem to outline another talk on the back cover.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968
New York (NY), INDIA, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C.

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Letter from James O'Malley to MLK

Chicago, IL, POLAND, LITHUANIA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Illinois (IL)

Father James O'Malley of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Chicago asks Dr. King to withdraw from the Chicago Lawn area. He is concerned about the potential response to integration of the Lithuanians and Poles who live in the neighborhood.

Letter from John E. Smylie to MLK

Friday, May 31, 1963
Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, Chaplain Smylie requests for Dr. King to preach at Occidental College. Smylie states, "We would be honored to have you or one of your representatives at Occidental."

Telegram from Bennette, Calhoun and Ellis to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

J.H. Calhoun, Ocelia Ellis and Fred Bennette send their prayers and support to Dr. King during Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham City Jail.