The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"California (CA)"

Telegram from MLK to President Eisenhower

Thursday, August 13, 1959

This is the text of a telegram Dr. King sent to President Eisenhower regarding the contemporaneous events of the opening of desegregated schools and the arrival of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev.

CORE List of 33 Lunch Counters With Unchanged Policies

Monday, February 20, 1961

This document is a CORE list of cities where lunch counter demonstrations have been ineffective.

Letter from J. Stanley Purnell to Rev. MLK, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1968

The Chairman of the United Health Foundations, J. Stanley Purnell, sends out an gratitude of thanks to Daddy King.

Letter from Bill Daniels to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 2, 1967

Bill Daniels, the editorial cartoonist for WSB Radio and Television, responded to a letter he received from Ms. Dora McDonald concerning a cartoon. He suggested that she have her television adjusted, as the cartoon is "by no means a negro."

Letter from James W. Kelly to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963

James W. Kelly, Director of Chaplains Division, writes Dr. King inviting him to a Supervisory Chaplains Conference headed by the Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy. Kelly states that the conference is a rededication of service to God and his people in the military. Kelly closes by stating, "Your Cooperation will be a great contribution to the cause of religion in the United States Navy and Marine Corps and to their clergymen in uniform."

Suggestions for S.C.L.C.

Dr. King drafts a list of suggestions for the SCLC and lists the contact information for several of the organizations members.

Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Wednesday, July 11, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.

Letter from MLK to Minnie N. Thompson

Monday, April 9, 1962

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Minnie N. Thompson for her encouragement. He states he will make an effort to meet her son when he visits the Morehouse College Campus.

Notes for U.F.T. Address

On March 14, 1964, Dr. King was presented with the John Dewey Award by the United Teachers Federation. The address he delivered that day is outlined in this type-written draft along with his handwritten notes. In the draft, Dr. King emphasizes the importance of education, especially as a tool for African American advancement. He cites how the deprivation of education has been used as a way to systematically oppress African Americans and he asserts that this inequality is a reality that must be confronted. Dr.

Letter from MLK to Norman Baugher

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King conveys his support to Norman Baugher for the Church of the Brethren's past correspondence regarding publicizing the philosophy of nonviolence.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

Letter from Mrs. W. J. Givan to MLK about Unsavory Association

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Givan expresses her dissatisfaction with Dr. King on how "prominent Negroes" are often photographed with "unsavory whites."

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eugene Exman about MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1961

Ms. McDonald writes Harper & Brothers executive to confirm receipt of his letter to Dr. King dated June 19, 1961 requesting a proposed timeline for the completion of a forthcoming book. Ms. McDonald reassures Harper and Brothers that Dr. King is adhering to the request and will take five weeks off to ensure completion.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller writes Dr. King to tell him how much of a "privilege" it was to see him and meet Mrs. King at the Spelman College luncheon. He alludes to "tragic circumstances" surrounding his visit, but nonetheless conveys appreciation for the opportunity to be in attendance and meet with those working "for the cause of better understanding."

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Letter from S. O. Adebo to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

S. O. Adebo, a permanent representative of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the United Nations, requests a meeting with Mr. Brown and his colleagues. Mr. Brown is the Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa. This letter references the Nigeria-Biafra situation, which Dr. King was deeply concerned about.


Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

Letter from Congressman Edward R. Roybal to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

California Congressman Roybal responds to a message from Dr. King regarding the seating of the Mississippi delegation. Roybal reminds Dr. King of his record on matters related to civil rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jacob Broertjes

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Dora McDonald sends Jacob Broertjes a tentative schedule for Dr. King's upcoming speaking engagement in Amsterdam with the Baptist Federation.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King addresses his concerns about the rise of anti-Semitism in Germany.

Schleiermacher (What Is the Operation of Grace)

Dr. King records a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher's work "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Press Release Issued by MLK

Monday, June 5, 1961

The following document is a press release issued by Dr. King. In the first section, he comments on the success of various civil rights demonstrations across the nation. In the second section, of the press release, Dr. King makes a clear distinction between race riots and nonviolent movements in Alabama.

Ordained by God

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King for his proposed hypocrisy. The author contends that violence and law breaking are ungodly behaviors and therefore should not be associated with the peace movement that Dr. King endorses.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.