Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Cambridge, MA"

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Letter from Rosetta Ritz to MLK

Sunday, March 13, 1966

Rosetta Ritz expresses admiration and gratitude to Dr. King for his selfless efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Ritz hopes Dr. King will find time to visit with "economically deprived" children in the Chicago area.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

Support Negro Business

This ad by Operation Breadbasket contains a letter from Dr. King promoting support of Negro businesses.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Jesus

Dr. King highlights the significant characteristics of Jesus Christ.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 15, 1964

This letter, dated October 15, 1964, was written from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald congratulating him on the Nobel Peace Prize. Daves was in negotiation to place his "I Have a Dream" speech on the National Documents Committee.

American Foundation on Nonviolence Board Meeting

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Harry W. Wachtel reports the minutes of the American Foundation of Nonviolence Board Meeting held in New York City, New York.

Press Release from SCLC on New Biography of MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

This 1964 press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference focuses on a new biography of Dr. King "...written especially for children."

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mrs. Epworth about an Invitation

Friday, January 12, 1968

Here, Ms. McDonald offers a belated reply to Mrs. Epworth regarding an invitation for Dr. King and his family to dine with the Epworth family. Dr. King does not decline the invitation, but instead takes a raincheck due to an unpredictable schedule.

The Function of the Field Staff

Tuesday, July 10, 1962

The Department of Organization in the Congress of Racial Equality releases a memorandum detailing the function of the field staff position. The responsibilities include stimulating new activity for the group and acting as a consultant.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Monday, January 23, 1967

R. W. Boone sends this Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Routing Slip to Dr. King. The slip lists the name "Andy," which could be in reference to King's associate Andrew Young.

The Transcendental Dialectics

Dr. King writes on the "soul" and the "world" as two ideas of reason. He speaks to the human tendency to apply the categories of quantity, quality, relation, and modality to our understanding of the self. King ends these notes by contemplating "two absolutely contradictory propositions [that] seem to be established by the refutation of the other."

How My Theology Has Changed

Dr. King highlights seven main ways in which his theological views have changed since his final year at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from John A. McDermott to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago asks Dr. King, as a former John F. Kennedy award winner, to write a telegram of congratulations to the current nominee. This year's recipient, Reverend Richard Morrisroe, was shot and wounded in Alabama the previous summer while campaigning for civil rights.

Letter from Harold Franklin to MLK

Saturday, May 2, 1964

Harold Franklin expresses appreciation to Dr. King for granting him scholarship aid.

Letter to Wallace Webster from MLK

Tuesday, December 29, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Webster's invitation, but informs him that he has decided to commit more time to the civil rights struggle and is unable to accept.

Letter from Bonnie Scott to MLK

Bonnie Scott, a student at Lake Forest College, sends Dr. King a letter asking him for his bibliography as well as information about nonviolence for their senior thesis.

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

Thursday, June 20, 1963

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

Letter from Robert L. Tucker Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Robert Tucker inquires about Dr. King's views on Adam Clayton Powell and his position in Washington. Tucker states that he has great respect for Dr. King, which is why he wants clarity on his sentiments regarding the Powell controversy.

MLK Responds to Robert W. Fischer on Autographed Cover of TIME Magazine

Tuesday, March 24, 1964

Dr. King responds to Robert Fischer's request for is Autographed cover of TIME magazine. He expresses his appreciation of Fischer's support and how honored he was to receive the title of Man of the Year. Dr. King views this honor as a tribute to the entire civil rights movement and those who continuously pursue the fight for social justice.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Thursday, December 19, 1963

In this letter to Dr. Mays, Dr. King mentions a letter of recommendation written on the behalf of William Herbert Gray Jr.

Musical Composition by C. Bosserman

This untitled musical composition by C. Bosserman alludes to the White race, urging the White race to join the human race.

Gods Existence

Abstract: Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

Letter from Sankey Blanton to MLK

Wednesday, October 3, 1951

Sankey Blanton, of Crozer Theological Seminary, sends Martin Luther King, Jr. half of his fellowship grant for the 1951-1952 academic year. A second check will be sent when they have received his first semester grades and registration for the second semester.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.