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I Marched on Washington

Washington (WA), Louisiana (LA), Philadelphia, PA

Kelly E. Miller composed this poem for Dr. King as a tribute to the March on Washington.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

Sermon Outline

This document outlines sermon notes and ideas. Dr. King references passages from the book of Luke. He also wonders what Christ did to give people hope when their desires had not been reached. King also discusses that Jesus conquers time, where as, human beings are victims of time.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Friday, August 30, 1957
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Mysticism

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking’s “The Meaning of God in Human Experience.”

God

Dr. King records his thoughts on the book of Deuteronomy to illustrate the oneness of God.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
CANADA

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Letter from Samuel Merrick to Robert Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

U.S. Department of Labor representative Samuel V. Merrick reports the details of a Texas racial discrimination case to Senator Robert F. Kennedy.

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

Friday, December 3, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Ohio (OH), Indiana (IN)

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Letter from Edris Head to MLK about Mormans and the Presidential Election

Saturday, May 20, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Mrs. Head conveys to Dr. King her opinion of potential presidential candidate George Romney while criticizing the Mormon clergy and their road to priesthood. Additionally, Mrs. Head compares Dr. King to Gandhi and Jesus.

Letter from MLK to Reverend George W. Goth

Sunday, October 27, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend George Goth of Metropolitan United Church declining his invitation to make an appearance at his church. Dr. King has engagements for the remainder of the year that hinder him from committing to any further appearances.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Wachman

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King informs Dr. Wachman, that due to his extremely busy schedule and his particular attention to the South, he will not be able to accept an invitation to speak at Lincoln University.

SNCC - SCLC Alabama Staff Meeting

Friday, January 28, 1966
Alabama (AL)

Randolph Blackwell updates Andrew Young of the recent SCLC and SNCC joint meeting intended to resolve any conflicts between the two organizations and their initiatives within the state of Alabama. The mounting tension between the two civil rights organizations is attributed to the rise of Black Panther Party chapters throughout the South, a phenomenon from which SCLC intends to distance itself.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from Paul P. Martin to MLK

Monday, March 26, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Erie Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the principal speaker at its Freedom Rally.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

GREECE, Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), INDIA

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Education Heritage

Friday, March 13, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the Educational Heritage Company has come to an arrangement about distributing "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." The letter goes on to say that Educational Heritage will pay a guarantee of $2500 against a royalty of 42 cent per copy sold.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York, NY

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Letter from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Wednesday, September 27, 1967
London, England

Dr. King is visiting Newcastle, England to receive an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Bettenson of Dr. King's schedule and requirements so that the staff can prepare accordingly.

If I Can Help Somebody

These are the words to a song written in 1945 by Alma Bazel Androzzo that was made famous by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. Dr. King quotes this song in his Drum Major Instinct sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on February 4, 1968.

Letter from MLK to Blaine Marrin

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Detroit, MI, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King thanks Blaine Marrin and the local 157 UAW members for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the relationship between the labor and civil rights movements. He also discusses the financial needs of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Telegram to MLK from W.E. Gardner

Thursday, August 16, 1962

Rev. Gardner organizes a board meeting to plan for a Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Nature

Dr. King quotes Aristotle's "Physics, Book II" and notes Spinoza's view of nature.

The Trinity

Dr. King provides the historical origin and ideology of the Trinity.

Letter from William Caspe and Bruce Fleegler to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS)

William Caspe and Bruce Fleeger, representatives of the Northern Student Movement at Brandies University, inform Dr. King of their past civil rights efforts with Negroes in the south and their upcoming "Fast for Freedom" event. They request Dr. King's written endorsement of the program and ask that he encourage others to participate.

Letter from Susan Altman to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Susan Altman requests an autographed copy of Time magazine, in which Dr. King was featured.

Letter from Bishop P. Randolph Shy to MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA, California (CA)

Presiding Bishop of The Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, P. Randolph Shy, declines Dr. King's invitation to attend an upcoming convention. Bishop Shy mentions that he will make a contribution "through our churches to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference."