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Shattered Dreams and Unfulfilled Hopes

Dr. King based this sermon on unfulfilled hopes and dreams. He focused on the story of the Apostle Paul and his wish to journey to Spain. Paul did eventually go to Spain but "as a prisoner and not as a free man." Dr. King told his congregation that they all faced unfulfilled dreams at some point in their lives.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Royalty Statements from Harper & Row, Publishers

Sunday, June 30, 1963

Harper & Row, Publishers sends Dr. King this royalty statements for sales of "Strength to Love" and "Stride Toward Freedom" for the first 6 months of 1963.

Letter from William J. Connor to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Dr. King was the recipient of the correspondence from Mr. William J. Connor of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Connor was honored to extend a contribution to the civil rights movement. He went on to extend courtesies to Dr. King's family and Rev. Abernathy.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James Halsey

Wednesday, March 20, 1963

Dora McDonald sends, at Dr. King's request, a check to Dr. James Halsey.

Letter from Bernard Holliday to MLK

Monday, September 23, 1963

President of Ministers Alliance, Mr. Holliday writes to Dr. King to show his support for the tragic incident that took place September 15, 1963. They enclosed a check to the families that lost someone during this terrible event.

Letter from MLK to Chris Folker of Sweden

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Chris Folcker's support and hospitality during his trip to Sweden. He also shares his satisfaction with the unique reaction of Mr. Folcker's organization.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

Wednesday, June 17, 1959

The Executive Director, Jacob Seidenberg, writes to Participants of the Religious Leaders Conference to send them a roster of people who have attended similar events. These people may be selected to help with the Conference on May 11, 1959.

Letter to Kenneth Gibbs from Dora McDonald

Monday, September 30, 1963

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Gibbs a letter of thanks for his kind letter of support and encloses an autographed cover of TIME magazine on behalf of Dr. King.

Soul Force and Woman Power

This notecard titled Soul Force refers to a Woman Power March to be held on June 19, 1968

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. V. E. Moray

Friday, April 14, 1967

Joan Daves gives Dr. Moray permission to publish a Marathi edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Commentary on MLK Article

This article describes Dr. King's approval of a recent civil rights ordinance passing in Gary, Indiana. The purpose of the ordinance is to prohibit discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing or financing of real estate. Dr. King thanks the community and members of the City Council for making the ordinance possible.

Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Salem Baptist Church Worship Service Program

Sunday, September 11, 1960

Dr. King attends Salem Baptist Church in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania as a guest speaker.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter Draft from MLK to Mrs. Lewiston

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Lewiston to inform her that he will not be able to assist her with her financial problems because of the financial burdens that have already been placed on SCLC.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Eugene Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addresses multiple issues that were misunderstood. He then encourages Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions and informs him that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter from Gerald Gotting to MLK

Friday, November 10, 1967

Gerald Gotting writes a letter in German requesting a peaceful end to the Vietnam war.

Get Well Message to MLK from the Anderson Family

The Anderson family wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery and informs him of a recent meeting with Rev. Kelley.

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy from Ralph E. Gulliver

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

The James H. Farrell Lodge contributes to the SCLC for the cause of Freedom-Now.

History and Human Nature

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation" on the rebellion against rationalism's interpretation of human nature.

Letter from Dorothy Cotton to Mrs. E.A. Johnson

Thursday, April 5, 1962

Educational Consultant Dorothy Cotton writes workshop attendee Mrs. E.A. Johnson concerning the importance of citizenship education, particularly in getting Negroes to vote. She addresses a concern of Mrs. Johnson's involving a young man invited to attend a citizenship workshop. Ms. Cotton informs Mrs. Johnson that Dr. King will speak with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in addressing the young man's situation.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In this column, Dr. King speaks of the outbreak of "Nazi-like degeneracy" less than 15 years after the Holocaust. He says that in spite of these evils, it should not discourage us from coming together as human beings, living in harmony and not letting the dangers of racism paralyze us as a world community.