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News from the American Jewish Committee

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

This news release announces that John Gardner, former Secretary of Health (among other positions) accepted the head position of the Urban Coalition, a campaign that combats urban poverty.

Letter From MLK to Mrs. William Lescase

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

Dr.King thanks Mrs. William Lescaze for her contribution to the SCLC.

Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

God

Dr. King quotes Dr. William Temple, stating that "God minus the world equals God; the world minus God equals nothing."

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall informs Dr. King that the Department of Justice is investigating the assault upon Reverend Paul Chapman.

Letter from Henry H. Arrington to Paul Whelehon about P. Ballantine & Sons Employment of Negroes

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The letter references letters between Arrington and John Farrell, regarding the employment of a Negro representative. Mr. Kiah Sayles, a representative of P. Ballantine & Sons, explained that P. Ballantine & Sons was the first company to hire Negro models which elevated Negroes in executive positions. Sayles went on to explain the liberal hiring policy of Coyle Beverage, a distributor of P. Ballantine and Sons.

Letter from MLK to Walter Harding

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the dedication of Walter Hardin's book. Walter Hardin was considered a distinguished professor and scholar at State University College of Geneseo, New York.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that a check for $24.96 is enclosed. The check represents the permission fee for the use of an extract from "Stride Toward Freedom" by Macmillan Company.

Notecard Regarding God

In this handwritten notecard, Dr. King gives a description of God.

Letter from John Barber to Mrs. A.W. Boone

Monday, November 8, 1965

John Barber, Executive Assistant to Dr. King, thanks Mrs. Boone of Atlanta's Booker T. Washington High School for agreeing to find a "Negro youngster" to become the pen pal of "a young French correspondent." The pen pal request resulted from communication between Dr. King and Dominique Pire, a Nobel Peace Prize recipient and Belgian priest.

Mars Lecture Series

Tuesday, April 15, 1958

This 1958 program features Dr. King as guest lecturer for the Mars Lectures at Northwestern University.

Letter from Alice Brainerd to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

Ms. Brainerd criticizes the methods of Dr. King, asserting that "civil disobedience and non-cooperation" are not the best approach to take towards justice.

Letter from some White Citizens of Mississippi to MLK about a Wedding

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

In this letter Mrs. A.N. Brown and several others express their interest in having Dr. King demonstrate in front of a church at which Lucy Johnson will be getting married.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom News Release

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

The National Urban League expresses it's gratitude for being apart of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Whitney Young expresses the importance of Americans continuing their fight for equality through the proper necessary legislation.

MLK's Statement on Endorsing a 1960 Presidential Candidate

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

Dr. King states that the SCLC is a non-partisan organization and that he cannot endorse a political party or candidate. He then goes on to express gratitude for Senator Kennedy and Mayor Hartsfield for their continuous support and leadership.

Letter from Richard Clemence to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Richard Clemence, a white Air Force officer, thanks Dr. King for his service to the nation in bringing people together. Clemence wrtes that "your steady guiding hand and spirit have led many to see the light of moral right."

Volunteers Serving Program

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, August 29, 1965

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Letter from MLK to Adolph Held

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dr. King writes Adolph Held, President of the Jewish Labor Committee, in response to his inquiry regarding SCLC's position on anti-semitism. Dr. King clarifies a number of distortions produced by the media, and presents the facts of the Chicago Conference of New Politics event throughout the letter.

Movement for Puerto Rican Independence

Pedro Juan Rua, a leader in the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, gives a speech concerning the American military presence in Vietnam. He provides a historical framework for understanding America's involvement with other oppressed nations, asserting "U.S. rulers are new Nazis. Unite to defeat them."

Letter from Robert Needles to MLK

Thursday, June 17, 1965

A critic writes to Dr. King to explain why he will not support his program. He insists that Dr. King's activity only contributes to the "deterioration of the colored people in America."

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from FBI Director John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the work of Special Agents of the Bureau in Alabama.

Religious Education

Dr. King discusses the topic of religious education. King asserts that religious education should not become a substitute for personal evangelism and that "religious instruction without conversion is comparatively ineffective."

Letter from William Adams to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

William Adams from the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary writes Dr. King informing him of political matters in New York City, which may hinder the civil rights efforts of African Americans.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Saturday, April 29, 1967

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from C. A. Milton Hogg to MLK

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

C. A. Milton Hogg, a member of the Negro Citizenship Association Inc., provides Dr. King with a copy of documentation regarding a resolution to the racial issues.

Letter from The Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club to Dr. King

Thursday, October 2, 1958

Samuel Baskerville, of the Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club, wrote to Dr. King out of sympathy, for his nearly fatal stabbing at a department store in Harlem. Mr. Baskerville, on behalf of his organization, conveyed their delight in knowing of Dr. King's survival, per various press releases.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.