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Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Thursday, February 27, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Letter from Willis C. Tabor to MLK

Tuesday, June 15, 1965
Chicago, IL, Selma, AL, Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Missouri (MO)

In this letter from Willis C. Tabor to Dr. King Mr. Tabor requests an application for employment with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after his dismissal as pastor of West Side Christian Parish.

Letter from Joseph L. Kapica to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA, Minnesota (MN), Boston, MA, CANADA, Chicago, IL

Joseph Kapica, a freelance writer from Connecticut, requests special commentary from Dr. King regarding the issue of interracial adoption. Kapica writes about interracial adoption based on findings from the Child Welfare League of America.

Letter from Aggie Smith to MLK

Tuesday, January 25, 1966
Chicago, IL

Aggie Smith invites Dr. King and his children to visit her school in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
New Mexico (NM), Atlanta, GA

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.

Letter from W. Russell Chapman to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

The York County, Pennsylvania branch of the NAACP sends a second invitation to Dr. King to be a guest speaker.

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

Letter to MLK from Cydrisse Crafton

In this document, Mr. Crafton writes to Dr. King advising not to participate in another "March". He asserts that "Negro's" are marching because they desire to live in a white neighborhood.

Colwell, Ernest Cadman

Dr. King references Ernest Caldwell's book "Toward Better Theological Education."

Letter from Mrs. Donald H. Hage to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Colorado (CO), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Hage praises Dr. King's work, particularly his use of peaceful means to accomplish his goals. She also requests information about how best to help at the local level in Colorado.

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963
New York (NY), BRAZIL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter to MLK Regarding Support and Donation

Saturday, September 27, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

A New York couple and their 9 year old son, mailed Dr. King this get well letter praying for his recovery and saluting him for his work.

Public Statement by the Albany Movement

Tuesday, January 23, 1962

The statement from the Albany Movement addresses issues of racial injustice and stresses the importance of equality for all.


Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah demonstrating God's wrath.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

Letter from David H. McKillop to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964
SPAIN, Washington, D.C.

David McKillop informs Dr. King that the United States Consulate General in Barcelona received a letter from five Spanish citizens congratulating him for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Dora McDonald Re Thich Nhat Hanh

Friday, January 27, 1967
New York, NY

Raphael Gould, of The Fellowship of Reconciliation, writes to Miss McDonald requesting a letter from Dr. King nominating Thich Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Gould calls attention to the approaching deadline and the extensive documentation that must accompany the letter.

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Kentucky (KY), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Arkansas (AR), Texas (TX), Oklahoma (OK), Tennessee (TN), Maryland (MD), Florida (FL), West Virginia (WV), Delaware (DE)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK and Andrew Young

Friday, July 7, 1967
New York, NY, Georgia (GA)

As a result of an automobile accident, Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King and Andrew Young of possible litigation against SCLC.

SCLC Answers Attorney General Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Clayton releases a statement concerning accusations made against Dr. King. In the statement, Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook states that Dr. King refused to give him information him concerning a known communist named Jack O'Dell. Dr. King confirms that he has, in fact, cooperated with Cook and that O'Dell no longer works for the organization.

Volunteers Serving Program

Georgia (GA)

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, Montgomery, AL

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Letter from Mary L. Bryant to MLK

Georgia (GA)

Mary L. Bryant writes Dr. King seeking help. She is a mother of eight and in desperate need of used clothes for her children. Her appeal comes as a result of financial hardship due to covering the medical expenses of a child with a serious illness.

Letter from Fred Sondermann to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Colorado (CO)

Mr. Sondermann invites Dr. King on behalf of Colorado College to speak at their annual symposium. Mr. Sondermann discusses this important tradition and explains the upcoming topic.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, dated October 5, 1966, J. Campe encloses royalty payments for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," "Why We Can't Wait", and "Strength to Love."