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Letter from Thomas Maloney to Dora McDonald

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Rev. Maloney thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance and the materials that she sent.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964

Dr. King is invited to deliver the main address for The Presbyterian College of Montreal's Annual Convocation in April of 1965. The institution will be preparing to celebrate its 100th Anniversary.

Reuther in Praise of Poverty War Funds to Alabama Farmers Cooperative

Monday, May 15, 1967

Walter Reuther, president of United Auto Workers, comments on the Office of Economic Opportunity's decision to give financial aid to the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association.

Letter from Gino Gullace to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

Dr. King is asked to participate in a worldwide survey on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life After Death." The survey is sponsored by OGGI magazine a weekly publication in Milano, Italy.

Declaration of Independence by MLK

Dr. King writes an article making reference to the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln, and the historical impact they both have had on the economy and what is described to be a social revolution. It is noted that this article is intended for a December, 1962 issue of a publication.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Letter from Leslie Orear to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

Leslie Orear requests Dr. King's assistance with judging the eight candidates for the Russell Bull Scholarship.

Letter from MLK to Debbie Steiner

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. King thanks Miss Steiner for her letter and explains how love is the way to overcome the injustices brought on by prejudice and ignorance. He writes that, though it can be difficult, she must direct her thoughts in a loving way towards those who mistreat her.

Letter from John G. Kirk to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

John G. Kirk of Metromedia asks Dr. King to write an editorial for a future publication called "America Now." Dr. King's article is to be based on the assumption that it is the responsibility of the government to enhance the dignity of individual citizens.

The Second Annual Bishop Lichtenberger Human Rights Award Dinner

The Chicago Chapter of The Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity invites Dr. King to the Second Annual Bishop Lichtenberger Human Rights Award Dinner. This award is being accepted by Mrs. Philip B. Daniels on behalf of her late son, Jonathan Myrick Daniels.

Letter from Jessie Jackson to C. L. Franklin

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

Reverend Jessie Jackson writes this letter to Reverend C. L. Franklin of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Jackson expresses his gratitude for Franklin's suggestions and assistance during a recent stay in Detroit. He also appreciates the solidarity exhibited towards the SCLC.

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Letter from W. Harding Kneedler to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

Dr. W. Harding Kneedler states that "marches are outdated" and believes that a solution is to have quiet organized action.

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.

Letter from Margo George to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Margo George, a student at the Kent School, wrote to Dr. King requesting any suggestions on how she could help with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Monday, December 30, 1963

The Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg invites Dr. King to speak at meeting that will be held at the Pennsylvania State Educational Building. Martin Morand, Vice-President of the Council, also includes information about the issues in Harrisburg's black community to show why Dr. King should accept the invitation.

Address to the National Bar Association

Thursday, August 20, 1959

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

Mystery

Dr. King records a quote on mystery from Robert Flint's "The Philosophy of History."

Letter from Shelia Mills to MLK

Sunday, December 13, 1964

Shelia Mills, a 7th grade student, commends Dr. King for his efforts within the nonviolence movement and for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, June 2, 1967

Ms. Badeker informs Dora McDonald that three copies of a contract with Econ Verlag are enclosed. She instructs that Dr. King is to sign and return the copies in order to further the German-language rights to "Where Do We Go from Here?"

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. Jesse Jackson

Dr. King writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson, urgently requesting his presence at a meeting of the Action Committee for Washington.

Dr. King To Lead Holy Land Tour

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release regarding Dr. King's planned Pilgrimage to the Holy Land in November.

Letter from Wilson Woodbeck to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967

Mr. Woodbeck invites Dr. King to be an honorary member of the National Association of Negro Musicians. For Dr. King’s review, several letters are enclosed complimenting the organization on their work and contribution to society.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

Handwriiten Notecard Regarding Freedom

This notecard written by Dr. Martin Luther King, cites a quote, of Tillich, regarding freedom.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

A. Phillip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, writes to Dr. King enclosing a letter to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Randolph addresses concerns of nationwide rioting in retaliation to social and economic oppression.

Letter from MLK to Joan Daves

Saturday, August 29, 1964

In this response letter, Dr. King encloses a revised copy of a manuscript from an article of which the reverend planned to make additional changes to.