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Letter from Burt Nelson and Hilda Nelson to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Burt and Hilda Nelson write Dr. King requesting five copies of his address of April 5, 1967.

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

GHANA, ISRAEL

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Letter from Arthur R. Mann to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Arthur Mann thanks Dora McDonald for her hospitality during a recent visit to Atlanta by New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller.

Support Letter to MLK

Wednesday, January 10, 1962

Kiser writes Dr. King to enclose a financial contribution and expresses the need for better integration.

Antioch College Commencement Program

Saturday, June 19, 1965
Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

This is a program for Antioch College's 1965 commencement, at which Dr. King addressed the graduating class.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Georgia (GA), VIETNAM, New Hampshire (NH), Wisconsin (WI)

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

Letter from Gregory Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968
Des Moines, IA, Iowa (IA)

Eleven-year-old Gregory Williams expresses his admiration and support for Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

An Order For the Baptism of Adults

Dr. King outlines the order of the baptism service, including specific phrases for the minister to use.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

JAPAN, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Telegram from George Houser to MLK

Thursday, November 11, 1965
New York, NY

George Houser of the American Committee on Africa urges Dr. King to telegram the President about Rhodesia's unilateral declaration of independence. The Rhodesian government, under Prime Minister Ian Smith, took this illegal action to break from the United Kingdom after days of negotiation with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson. The British sought to give blacks a fair share of power.

Mission to Mississippi

California (CA), North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Letter from Bruce Macdonald to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967
CANADA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

Brice Macdonald, a writer for Canada's national newspaper "The Globe and Mail," informs Dr. King that he will be travelling to the South to see how it is developing. Macdonald inquires if he can converse with Dr. King or any of his employees who are well informed on the situation in Southern regions.

Letter from MLK to Rev. A C K Arbouin

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York (NY)

This letter is in response to and appreciation of contributions, made to the SCLC, by Reverend A C K Arbouin.

Letter From Henry Springs Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mr. Henry Springs requests Dr.King's help in creating "Action Programs," that would be beneficial to the African-American community in Lake County, Illinois.

Los Angeles Times: Prophetic Talk of Dr. King

Tuesday, April 16, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Carl Greenberg, Political Editor for the Los Angeles Times, wrote this editorial about Dr. King's final trip to California and his opinion on the 1968 Presidential Campaign. Mr. Greenberg describes Dr. King's assessment of the war on poverty, the 1968 Democratic National Convention and possible support for Eugene McCarthy or Robert Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to John L. Tilley

Tuesday, January 6, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is requesting the use of Morehouse College for a three-day conference of southern leaders. The conference will be sponsored by the SCLC and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. Target issues include nonviolence and social action.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. White

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that she should seek financial assistance from her local welfare office because the SCLC will not be able to provide that service.

Immortality

Dr. King takes notes regarding immortality. In his notes, he references Johann Fichte's definition of ethics. He also discusses human duty as it relates to immortality.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH AFRICA, BELGIUM, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, MEXICO, PUERTO RICO, VIETNAM, SOUTH KOREA, TAIWAN, THAILAND, Chicago, IL, CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Cleveland, OH, JAPAN, FRANCE, ZIMBABWE, New York (NY)

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Letter from Mark Baldwin to MLK about an Interview

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Mark Baldwin, managing editor of the "Washingtonian" magazine, requests an interview with Dr. King to be conducted by Tom Donnelly.

Antidotes For Fear

MEXICO, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Letter from Marie Turner to MLK

Thursday, May 2, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this letter Marie Turner of the American Friends Service Committee requests copies of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" to be reproduced and distributed.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
San Francisco, CA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

McGraw-Hill Requests MLK Comment for New Author

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
New York, NY

An editor from McGraw-Hill Book Company writes Dr. King to introduce the work of young African-American author Audrey Lee. The company sends him a galley copy of "The Clarion People", in the hope that he will add a positive remark to help promote the book.

Letter from Samuel Abbott to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Samuel Abbott asks Dr. King for a personal favor in writing the preface for his recent publication.

Letter from MLK to Theodore W. Kheel

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

Dr. King graciously declines attorney and noted labor mediator Theodore Kheel's invitation to sit on the Dais at the International Longshoremen's 50th Anniversary Dinner due to a previous commitment in Berlin, Germany.

Vote No on State Question 409 – Oklahoma NAACP

Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders state their opinions regarding ballot question 409, the "right to work" law. All of the civil rights leaders encourage Negro readers to vote against passing his law because it will not benefit the Negro worker.