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"Chester, PA"

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Note from Mrs. Phyllis J. Sundquist to MLK

Mrs. Phyllis Sundquist encourages Dr. King to continue his stance against the Vietnam War for the betterment of the United States.


Dr. King references the concept of evil.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Edna R. McKinnon

Wednesday, December 20, 1967

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Edna McKinnon expressing deep appreciation for her generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He continues to say that the work of the organization is strengthened by such support.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Miss Rankin at the US Justice Department

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Dora McDonald sends Miss Rankin of the Justice Department a copy of a statement made by Dr. King before the Republican Party. The statement was in reference to his proposed "Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged."


Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Letter from Robert Johnson Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1961

Mr. Smith invites Dr. King to be a special guest at the Annual Men's Day at Salem Baptist Church. He also asks Dr. King to recommend Herbert C. Nelson for appointment as a federal judge.

The Suffering Servant

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.


Dr. King references two quotations on a note card titled "Man."

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.


Dr. King quotes a passage from Psalms 77:13, which discusses the greatness of God through comparison to other gods.

Telegram from the Students Union of Aarus University to MLK

Friday, October 16, 1964

The Students Union of Aarus University congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Maryland Congressman Charles M. Mathias thanks Dr. King for his letter regarding the Representative's recent trip to Selma, Alabama. As a result of his visit, Congressman Mathias informs Dr. King that he prepared and introduced civil rights legislation to the latest House of Representatives session.

Letter from L. H. Stibbards to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Mr. Stibbards sends a donation and words of encouragement from the McMaster Divinity Student's Association. He assures Dr. King that their members are at Dr. King's service.

Letter to Rev. MLK, Sr. from Arlen Fuhlendorf

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mrs. Arlen Fuhlendorkr writes to Rev. King Sr., expressing deep sympathy for the death of Dr. King. She also wanted to convey to Rev. King that he should be proud of the great work his son did for humanity.

Long Island Baptist Societies Memorial Resolution on MLK

In this memorial resolution, the Board of Trustees of the Long Island Baptist Societies expresses its deep sense of loss at the tragic death of Dr. King. The board acknowledges the debt that is owed to Dr. King and commits to continuing his work.

Is Nonviolence Effective

Rev. P. R. Regamey writes a paper that discusses whether or not nonviolence is effective. He uses Gandhi's methods as a basis for the paper. Rev. Regamey also addresses the broader theory and practice of nonviolence.

Institute for Human Relations LBJ Leaflet

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Letter from John D. Reinheimer to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mr. Reinheimer, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Wayne County Interfaith Commission on Human Rights, inquires about Dr. King's response toward debasing remarks made about him by Ohio Congressman John M. Ashbrook. The author states that the Commission does not agree with Mr. Ashbrook's comments and would like to assist in refuting them.

Letter from Edward McGaughy to MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963

Edward McGaughy writes to Dr. King suggesting a "Christmas for Human Rights." The writer highlights a strategy to help make it possible for families in need to receive aid.

Remarks at the Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Mathew Ahmann, Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, asserts that the citizens of the US have permitted evil and racial discrimination for too long. He joins forces with those against inequality with hopes for a better lifestyle for all Americans regardless of the color of their skin.

Letter from LeRoy Collins of the U.S. Department of Commerce

The Director of Communtiy Relations Service for the U.S. Department of Commerce, LeRoy Collins, offers their partnership and support to the National Assembly on Progress in Eaquality of Opportunity in Housing and the National College Student Conference on Freedom of Residence. Each conference addresses the issue of discrimination; inequalitiesof residence and citizenship at the community level.

MLK's Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King expounds on his brutal attack by the "deranged woman" Izola Ware Curry, in which he was stabbed near the heart. He stresses the importance of remaining committed to nonviolence and says he is grateful for the outpouring of sympathy and affection he received while in the hospital.

Presidential Invitation to White House Luncheon

Tuesday, June 5, 1962

President Kennedy invites Dr. King to attend a White House Luncheon on the occasion of the visit of Archbishop Makarios, the President of the Republic of Cyprus.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marie Freckelton

Friday, February 15, 1963

Dora McDonald sends acknowledgement of the receipt of a letter and photograph on behalf of Dr. King to Marie Freckelton.

SCLC National Executive Board Meeting

Thursday, March 30, 1967

The SCLC conducts a mass meeting with the national executive board in Kentucky. Both members from the SCLC and Kentucky Christian Leadership Conference direct the meeting. The schedule includes an invocation, greetings from various members, an address by Dr. King, and more.


Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.