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The Gibson Report

Monday, April 1, 1968

The Gibson Report illustrates the economic status of employed and unemployed African American women in the U.S. It also compared the incomes of white and black Americans.

Letter from MLK to William Kivi

Monday, July 17, 1967

In this letter to Mr. William Kivi, Dr. King expresses his view on the representation of the American flag.

Letter to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The author of this letter writes to oppose Dr. King's view of the government being the greatest infuser of violence. The author attributes Communism as the root of violence, and asks Dr. King to consider the consequences of unfavorable criticism during such times.

Letter from MLK to Rev. E. Wayne Roberts

Sunday, January 3, 1965

Dr. King writes Rev. E. Wayne Roberts in support of his fellow friend and SCLC Co-Founder Rev. C. K. Steele, Jr. He notes Rev. Steele as "a thorough and competent pastor" that exemplifies the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Moisa Bulboaca

Monday, May 16, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Louisiana native Moisa Bulboaca invites Dr. King to visit Romania. Ms. McDonald states Dr. King is involved in the freedom struggle and at the present time will be unable to accept the invitation.

Letter to MLK from Andrew W. Loewi

Saturday, October 28, 1967

Andrew W. Loewi writes Dr. King asking him to sign a petition against the Vietnam War.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

The Modern Negro Activist

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Letter from Marian Hargrave to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963

Ms. Hargrave offers her support for Dr. King and his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. She also discusses the religious aspects of the struggle, which she feels give it a deeper meaning.

Support Correspondence from Harold Ford to MLK

Sunday, September 3, 1967

In this letter, Harold Ford stresses the importance of the movement and the need for more privileged whites to lend a helping hand. He states that everyone has a moral responsibility to ensure the welfare of man kind and no one should haphazardly turn a blind to the issues of race and economics.

Dr. Abernathy Appeals to New Governor of Alabama

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

Ralph David Abernathy, vice-president of the SCLC, issues a press release concerning the federal governments decision to halt funding to the state of Alabama for noncompliance with the 'law of the land'. Abernathy appeals this decision and asserts that the blame should be directed towards local government officials such as George C. Wallace.

Redwood City, CA Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 1967

At the bottom of this clipping, from the Redwood City, California Tribune, is a brief update on the release of Dr. King's final book. The book entitled: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", according to the tribune, anticipated that it would be a very must-read publication.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK

An anonymous person wrote this letter to Dr. King, telling him that he is "directly responsible" for the murder of a 16 year old boy in Memphis, Tennessee.

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

Letter from MLK to Brown Brothers Harriman and Company about a Contribution

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to the Brown Brothers Harriman and Company for an anonymous contribution of company stock they forwarded. Dr. King also comments on why such contributions are needed.

Letter from Clyde Rembert to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Clyde Rembert, a broadcaster from KRLD-Radio and KRLD-TV, writes Dr. King inviting him to the radio show. Rembert seeks a response from Dr. King regarding a derogatory statement made by Dr. Criswell concerning King's anti-Vietnam war stance.

Petition for Charter, the Filing of the Clerk and Certificate of the Secretary of State for Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Thursday, March 24, 1966

The following is a copy of the cover for the petition for charter,the filing of the Clerk and certificate of the Secretary of State for "Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Letter from MLK to Dr. William H. Allen regarding kind letter

Tuesday, October 15, 1968

Dr. King sent this thank you letter to Dr. William Allen for the prayers and well wishes expressed to Dr. King, as he recovered from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem in 1958. He also conveyed to Dr. Allen that he had been making great progress in his health and anticipated rejoining those working hard in the fight for equality.

Letter from C.B. Atkins to MLK

Tuesday, June 12, 1962

In this document the writer thanks Dr. King for meeting with him concerning the proposed "Martin King album" and television series. The writer encloses a memorandum on consumer information and requests King's travel schedule.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

Proposed Agenda of Board Meeting

This document is a draft of an outline for the proposed agenda of an SCLC board meeting.

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Letter from Malcolm X to MLK

Wednesday, July 31, 1963

Malcolm X invites Dr. King, along with other Negro leaders, to give an analysis and a solution on the current "race problem" at a rally in New York on August 10th.

Letter from MLK to Carl Hayden

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King addresses Carl Hayden to commend him on the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

Friday, June 26, 1964

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Letter from Prue Robertson to Ethel Minor

Friday, June 9, 1967

Prue Robertson, secretary to Mrs. King, writes Ethel Minor concerning students in Belgium that would like to correspond with S.N.C.C.

Findings and Recommendation Committee

This is a recommendation to establish a temporary coordinating committee in Atlanta, GA to deal particularly in the areas of finance and communication.