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"Chicago, IL"

Protest Against MLK Flyer

Chicago, IL, CHINA

This flyer accuses Dr. King of being a traitor and calls for a protest rally when he appears at Grosse Pointe High School in Detroit

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, ISRAEL, NORTH KOREA

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. King Acceptance as an Honorary Member of Wellesley College

Dr. King often had delayed responses due to his strenuous schedule, traveling obligations, and completion of the necessary duties as the President of the SCLC. Dr. King's letter to Miss Knight provides an example of the unintentional unpunctuality as he accepts an award as an honorary member of Wellesley College class of 1966.

Letter from MLK to Michael J. Quill

Thursday, August 24, 1961
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Michael J. Quill's dedication to the "front lines" during a libel case. Dr. King informs Mr. Quill of the current status of the case and the courts response. He further provides Mr. Quill with the operations in the south and their deep involvement in the "Freedom Ride."

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

Letter from Orville Freeman to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

The author informs Dr. King of the efforts being made to adequately address the issues pertaining to nutritional health in the country.

Letter from MLK to Cal David Gleaton

Thursday, December 2, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA)

Dr. King thanks Rev. Cal Gleaton for his letter in support of the work of the SCLC. Dr. King tells Gleaton that the letter was uplifting and that his contribution to the morale and the spirit of the freedom movement is mostly appreciated by the staff of the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alfred A. Haesler Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Thursday, October 5, 1967
SWITZERLAND

In this correspondence to Alfred A. Haesler, Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, acknowledged the receipt of Mr. Haesler letter, inviting Dr. King to complete a writing assignment. However, due to prior engagements, Dr. King would not be able to complete any other publications, but offered that his book entitled, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?" answered most of the questions raised in the letter.

Gunnar Jahn's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Speech on MLK

Oslo, Norway, Montgomery, AL

Gunnar Jahn shares background information about Dr. King prior to presenting him the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. In his speech, Jahn informs the audience about the bus boycotts and the campaign for equality that Dr. King led. He also discusses Dr. and Mrs. King's choice to leave the easier life in the North to fight a racial battle in the South. Lastly he discusses Dr. King's dedication to his church and his faith in God.

Letter from some White Citizens of Mississippi to MLK about a Wedding

Wednesday, July 27, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

In this letter Mrs. A.N. Brown and several others express their interest in having Dr. King demonstrate in front of a church at which Lucy Johnson will be getting married.

Diagram of Apartment Complex Sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church

Three dimensional diagram of an apartment complex sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church.

MLK to Bill Moyers of Newsday

Friday, May 19, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King writes to Bill Moyers of NEWSDAY and apologizes for not responding to his letter in a timely manner.

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Astronomy

Dr. King writes about the smallness of the earth in the great expanse of the universe.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), PUERTO RICO

Mr. Kirkpatrick thanks Dr. King for his address at the Assembly in Puerto Rico for the World Convention of Churches of Christ. He also encloses a monetary donation to care for his expenses and serve as an honorarium.

Letter from Don Blaine to MLK

Thursday, August 26, 1965
Kansas (KS), Atlanta, GA

Don Blaine seeks advice from Dr. King concerning the idea of organizing a peace caravan that would travel throughout the United States. Blaine views this suggestion as a way to garner international support for peace.

Augustine's Theory of Knowledge

Dr. King discusses St. Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. According to Augustine, "sense knowledge is the lowest level of knowledge."

MLK Endorses Septima Clark's Autobiography

Monday, July 2, 1962

King writes this endorsement of Septima Clark's autobiography"Echo In My Soul," which captured her struggle as a Negro woman in the South. Clark was a prominent civil rights activist considered to be the "Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter writes Dr. King concerning the state in which Negroes live. The author feels as if Dr. King only addresses the faults of the white race instead of those of his own race.

Thank You Letter from Mary Keller to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Michigan (MI)

This letter from Mary Keller to Dr. King thanks him for his speech given at Grosse Pointe High School on March 14, 1968. Keller apologizes for the behavior of some "troublemakers" during the event.

Letter from Bruce Macdonald to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967
CANADA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

Brice Macdonald, a writer for Canada's national newspaper "The Globe and Mail," informs Dr. King that he will be travelling to the South to see how it is developing. Macdonald inquires if he can converse with Dr. King or any of his employees who are well informed on the situation in Southern regions.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Albany, GA

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Letter from Sue M. Stiles to MLK

Sunday, May 24, 1964

Sue Stiles writes Dr. King to assert her viewpoints and beliefs according to her childhood and upbringing. In expressing these truths, Stiles affirms her support in Dr. King's practices in human rights and encloses a financial contribution.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
New York, NY

Bayard Rustin writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference sponsored by the A. Philip Randolph Education Fund. The conference focuses on "The Role of Press in a Period of Social Crisis."

Letter from MLK to Senator Thomas H. Kuchel Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas H. Kuchel's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

I Have A Dream

Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Colorado (CO), New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), New Hampshire (NH), California (CA), Tennessee (TN), Louisiana (LA)

This is an excerpt of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, as delivered at the March on Washington. The moderator asks Marion Anderson to sing, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

Speeches by the Leaders

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISRAEL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, Boston, MA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, California (CA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Maine (ME), South Carolina (SC), New Hampshire (NH), Colorado (CO), Tennessee (TN)

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test