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Letter from Dean Florio to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Dean Florio sends condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Froydis Kvaerk to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966
Oslo, Norway, Washington, D.C.

Norwegian student Froydis Kvaerk requests a copy of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in fulfillment of a class assignment on Dr. King and the civil rights struggle.

Constitution and Bylaws of the SCLC

Atlanta, GA

This booklet contains the constitution and bylaws of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Rabbi Joel S. Goor to MLK

Tuesday, July 28, 1964
California (CA), St. Augustine, FL

Rabbi Joel Goor extends his appreciation to Dr. King for being able to participate in SCLC's 1964 desegregation campaign in St. Augustine, Florida. He feels that his involvement in the civil rights movement spirtitually enhances his role as an active religious leader. Rabbi Goor encloses a donation to the SCLC for assisting with his bail while being jailed in St. Augustine and a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King to autograph.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In the 3rd installment of "The Martin Luther King Column," Dr. King praises the Jewish people for seeking freedom for all. Dr. King discusses their contributions to "philanthropy and social organization."

Comments on John F. Kennedy by MLK at the Berlin Festival

Sunday, September 13, 1964
Berlin, Germany, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King gave this speech at the Berlin Freedom Festival in Berlin, West Germany, in memorial to the recently assassinated President John F. Kennedy. Dr. King reflects on the personality, achievements and enormous influence Kennedy had on the world. He highlights Kennedy's commitment to international human rights, which included recognition of Negro rights, and his leadership in concluding the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

SCLC Six-Month Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Thomas Offenburger, Director of Information for the SCLC Department of Information, composes a semi-annual report detailing the work of the department for Dr. King and Reverend Abernathy.

Letter from Dr. Mircea Tanasescu to MLK

California (CA), MEXICO, PANAMA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, San Francisco, CA, ROMANIA

Dr. Tanasescu asks Dr. King to help him receive permission from the Romanian government, so that his family may enter the United States.

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Moral Progress

Dr. King describes moral progress as endless struggle toward "an infinite goal," which will lead to "happiness."

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from Andrew Young to Harry Belafonte

Monday, February 28, 1966
New York, NY, Chicago, IL

Andrew J. Young writes Harry Belafonte applauding him on his television show "The Strolling Twenties." Unlike average shows, Belafonte delivers "high calibre performances" with the ability to articulate the realities of the American Negro. Young further expresses hope that the 1966 Freedom Festival in Chicago has a similar effect.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

Letter from Chris Folcker to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Recording

Friday, January 13, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Chris Folcker informs Joan Daves of the limitations of the grammophone record with Dr. King and Harry Belafonte produced in Stockholm.

Letter from Bronx High School Student Paul Kylar to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
New York (NY)

Paul Kylar, a student from the Bronx, writes Dr. King to convey support for his plea for peace. Kylar mentions that he attended a peace parade and how elated he is to know that Dr. King works for all people and not just Negroes.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an issue of Cuadernos, which printed a Spanish version of his Berlin address about President Kennedy. A copy of "Why We Can't Wait" is sold to Figaro Litteraire.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD)

Flozella Clark and Agnes Edwards congratulate Dr. King for being awarded the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. They also share what Dr. King's achievement means to them.

Letter from James Allen to MLK

Wednesday, April 6, 1966
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

James Allen expresses his opinion of the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Forgiveness and Repentance

Dr. King reviews a passage from the Book of Ezekiel regarding forgiveness and repentance. Summarizing the verse, he states that repentance involves an "actual change of attitude" and forgiveness includes forgetting past mistakes.

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

New York Welfare Organizers to Join Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Susan Oreskes, a welfare organizer in New York City, informs Dr. King that 2000 people demonstrated as part of Dr. Spock’s peace campaign. She and Beulah Sanders, Citywide Coordinator of Welfare Groups, took 4 busses from the Upper West Side to George Wiley’s Poverty Rights Convention in Washington in August where they met with Senator Jacob Javits about a guaranteed minimum income. Mrs. Oreskes also states she wants to work with Dr. King and includes addresses for Beulah Sanders and Arnaldo Barrow of the Puerto Rican Community Project.

MLK Cited in Damage Suit

Sunday, September 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The New York Times reports that Dr. King is one of the defendants in a $15 Million law suit.

Ferm, Vergilius (ed)

New York (NY)

Dr. King cites a book written by Vergilius Ferm that discusses theology in America.

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

Letter from Rose Mary to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Chicago, IL

Seventh grader Rose Mary writes to Dr. King commending his efforts concerning "racial problems" and informing him of her admiration.

Letter from Paul Johnson to MLK regarding American Politics

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, Paul Johnson tells Dr. King about how there is a concern about the state of the 1968 elections before soliciting Dr. King's response to a series of questions.

Letter from L. E. Stahl to SCLC

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Ruth Stahl encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC for their commitment to improving the issues of the world. Mrs. Stahl intended to join the NAACP but decided to contribute to progressive organizations instead.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, California (CA)

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.