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Letter from Andrew J. Young to Thomas A. Johnson

Tuesday, December 29, 1964
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

Andrew J. Young writes to Thomas A. Johnson regarding the SCLC annual income for the fiscal year September 1, 1963 to August 31, 1964.

MLK Delta Flight Itinerary

Atlanta, GA, GEORGIA, Georgia (GA), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, BRAZIL, BAHAMAS, Florida (FL), New York, NY, New York (NY), VENEZUELA, ARGENTINA, PUERTO RICO

This is Dr. King's flight itinerary. Included destinations are New York, Nassau, and Buenos Aires, South America.

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

Monday, January 23, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter from C. I. C. Bosanquet to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967
London, England, Atlanta, GA

C. I. C Bosanquet, Vice Chancellor of the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, expresses delight in Dr. King upcoming visit to receive an honorary Doctor of Civil Law degree. He sends Dr. King a lists possible transportation options from London to the university and inquires about the length of his stay.

Worship

Dr. King describes Edgar S. Brightman’s four attitudes of worship in “Philosophy of Religion.”

Letter from Mrs. Mildred Yacks to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Missouri (MO)

Mildred Yacks writes Dr. King, complimenting him on his character but shares her belief that King's efforts are useless unless he redirects the youth.

Harper & Row, Publishers, Book Format Instructions

This document contains instructions for the proper format of one of Dr. King's books.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

Saint Mary's Sends Invitation to MLK

Monday, November 28, 1966
Cambridge, MA, Atlanta, GA

This telegram sent to Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, requests that Dr. King make an appearance on March 12, 1967.

MLK Confidential Memorandum

Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA), New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King outlines the SCLC's direct action program for the communities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery.

Support Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962
California (CA), Ohio (OH)

A Jewish man sends Dr. King a letter expressing his support for "Stride Toward Freedom" and informing Dr. King about his connection to the black community.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Ethel T. Elsea, Assistant Editor of Fleming H. Revell Company, writes Dr. King requesting to use his quotation in Frank S. Mead's unpublished book. Elsea also encloses a release form for the Reverend to sign and return.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Monday, January 8, 1968
Oregon (OR), SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from MLK to David Brandyberry

Friday, August 9, 1963
Ohio (OH), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Brandyberry for his recent letter and explains why the current time is "a wonderful and challenging age." He also expresses his hope that the work done in Birmingham, Alabama will bring about better race relations.

Letter from Mahalia Jackson Foundation Requesting Financial Support

Illinois (IL)

In this letter addressed to "Friend," gospel singer Mahalia Jackson requests financial support for the Mahalia Jackson Foundation, which helps deserving children obtain a higher education.

Ferm, Vergilius (ed)

New York (NY)

Dr. King cites a book written by Vergilius Ferm that discusses theology in America.

Letter from Edmond Melis to MLK

Saturday, January 23, 1965
NETHERLANDS, UNITED KINGDOM

Edmond Melis asks Dr. King to write a forward for an international police association magazine. He also expresses an interest in helping end discrimination in the United States.

Letter from John Language to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

John Langone asks Dr. King to write an article for his psychology journal on violence.

Letter from Robert Needles to MLK

Thursday, June 17, 1965
Florida (FL)

A critic writes to Dr. King to explain why he will not support his program. He insists that Dr. King's activity only contributes to the "deterioration of the colored people in America."

Letter from MLK to Rev. James A. Shiflett

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Reverend Shiflett of Chicago for his involvement in and support of the Albany Movement.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

Dogmatics

Dr. King records a note on the function of dogmatic theology and a quote from Karl Barth's "Church Dogmatics: The Doctrine of the Word of God."

Letter by William Castleman on Northern Marches

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Illinois (IL)

William Castleman, Executive Director for the American Federation of Senior Citizens, commends Dr. King on the effectiveness of the marches in the North and says they should not be abandoned. At the time this letter was written, Dr. King had led numerous marches in Chicago and other urban cities focusing on equal housing. The correspondence references the Founding Fathers and the Constitutional rights that allow peaceful solution of the nation's problems.

Views of Senator Barry Goldwater

San Francisco, CA, New York (NY), California (CA)

This document depicts brief summaries of Senator Goldwater's sentiments regarding civil rights, social welfare, education, right-wing extremism, disarmament and peace.

Letter from Rev. C. J. Bell to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Rev. C. J. Bell, the Editor in Chief of the Alexandria News Leader and pastor of the Progressive Baptist Church, wrote this letter to Dr. Ralph David Abernathy expressing his support following Dr. King's assassination. Abernathy was named Dr. King's successor as president of the SCLC and Bell wishes to offer his help if he can be of service.

September 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s secretary writes Joan Daves to inform her of his absence.

Friday, September 11, 1964
GERMANY

Dora McDonald, secretary to Dr. King, wrote Joan Daves to inform her that Dr. King will look into the request from Philip Unwin upon his return from Berlin.

Western Union Telegram from Harrison Tweed and Bernard G. Segal to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965
Selma, AL, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Montgomery, AL

Mr. Tweed and Mr. Segal urge Dr. King to observe Judge Johnson's order prohibiting marches to Montgomery, Alabama. They also enclose an excerpt of their telegram to Governor George Wallace compelling him to restrain law enforcement from excessive force.

Royalties Summary to MLK from J. Campe

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY)

Here J. Campe itemizes the income from Dr. King's various publications including "Why We Can't Wait," "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love", for a total of $2202.26.