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Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Letter from John A.McDermott to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, invites Dr. King to be a special guest of honor at the annual John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. Theodore C. Sorenson, former Special Counsel to the late President Kennedy, will be the principal speaker at this event. Dr. King received the award two years earlier.

SCLC Mail Log: February 28, 1968

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This mail log exemplifies the large quantity of correspondence that the SCLC received daily, as well as the method that they devised to deal with it. The mail log for this day shows a variety of types of correspondence, including invitations, invoices, contributions, and personal letters from friends and colleagues.

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

How Do You View Progress in School Desegregation?

In this rough draft of an article written by Gene Roberts of the New York Times, Roberts expresses his optimistic and realistic views of the progress being made in integrating schools.

The Drum Major Instinct Sermon Outline

Monday, February 5, 1968

Dr. King outlines on scraps of paper his great sermon based on Mark 10:37. Everyone wants to be first, to get attention, he says, starting with our first cry as a baby. Adults want to do good and be praised. If the drum major instinct is not harnessed, the personality is distorted and we become boastful, gossip, put others down. On a societal level, this leads to exclusive social groups, racial prejudice and war. King states that Jesus’ answer is to dedicate this great force to worthy ends – goodness, moral excellence, generosity, kindness and service. .

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Tuesday, March 31, 1964

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

Letter from Reynold Moody to MLK

Reynold Moody, a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps, expresses support to Dr. King on behalf of the Miami, Florida Veterans for Peace.

SCLC Mail Log: February 23, 1968

Friday, February 23, 1968

This is a one-day mail log for incoming mail addressed to Dr. King and other SCLC associates. As an organizational tactic, the log kept track of the high volume of correspondence that came through the office.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Peggy Duff, from the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, writes to Dr. King requesting his support in ending the Vietnam War.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Letter from Member of SCLC to James Harrison

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

The letter's author encloses copies of recent checks made payable to the SCLC and contact information for individual and organizational contributors.

Letter from George Graham to MLK

Thursday, September 1, 1966

Mr. Graham thanks Dr.King for replying to his letter, and expresses how much he enjoyed seeing him when he visited Raleigh.

Telegram from Selma Frazier to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Selma Frazier and family send their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.

Letter from Silvio O. Conte to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Silvio Conte informs Dr. King that he received Dr. King's letter pertaining to the petition for home-rule of Washington D.C. Conte asserts that he is a strong advocate for home-rule of the district.

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Telegram from Author William Peters to Coretta Scott King Regarding a Book Opportunity

Peters was contracted to co-author the Myrlie Evers book by Random House. Random House then suggested he do the same with Coretta Scott King.

Letter from Arthur James to MLK

Arthur James, a member of the Movement for the Advancement of Black Brotherhood and Culture, invites Dr. King to speak at Lincoln University.

Letter from Menno Klassen to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Menno Klassen offers support on behalf of the Peace Committee of the Mennonite Central Committee for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Klassen explains that Dr. King is facing the same opposition that Jesus Christ did because he is continuing Jesus' work.

Letter from Asher Feren to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

Asher Feren writes to Dr. King to express his concerns for the Hyde Park High School Unity Plan.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Letter from E. Paul Weaver to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

E. Paul Weaver writes to Dr. King enclosing a small contribution for the work of the SCLC. Weaver also requests that the Dr. King visit Camp Mack as a guest speaker. The Executive Secretary of Church of the Brethren, one of three historic peace churches in the U. S., informs Dr. King of the Brethren's strong stand against slavery long before the Civil War.

Points for Progress, Birmingham, Alabama

This is a list or outline of points for progress in the Birmingham Campaign. They may have been used in a face-to-face presentation with local community leaders or with media officials. These words carefully enumerate the demands or wishes of the civil rights leaders and the Negro community.

God

Dr. King quotes a passage from "The Historic Faith and a Changing World," by Norman Pittenger.

Letter from Robert G. Lippmann to MLK

Saturday, November 16, 1963

Robert G. Lippmann requests a copy of the sermon Dr. King delivered at the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church for the funeral services of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Diane Wesley.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

Memo From Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, November 16, 1967

Miss Dora Mcdonald provides a brief summary of phone calls to Dr. King and the context of each.

Letter from Robert S. Swann to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

This letter to Dr. King accompanies the enclosure of a proposal regarding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Co-operative Association. Robert Swann hopes that this proposal can be discussed at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Washington, D.C.

Hate Mail Regarding Race Relations to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

The author write Dr. King to express his disdain for the Negro race. Stating that Negros are ?savages?, the author proclaims that the White race will forever remain in power.