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Letter from Hubert Reaves to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Michigan (MI)

As an inmate in Jackson, Michigan, Hubert Reaves writes Dr. King to express his interest in the SCLC, and inform him of his future education in ministry at the Detroit Bible College. Mr. Reaves also includes a letter to Mr. Goodall inquiring about his inmate account and the sending of his letters.

Letter from Leonard L. Smalls to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Leonard Smalls invites Dr. King to speak at the Men's Day Conference at the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter Draft from MLK to Mrs. Lewiston

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Lewiston to inform her that he will not be able to assist her with her financial problems because of the financial burdens that have already been placed on SCLC.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1967
New York (NY)

Bayard Rustin informs Dr. King that Albert Shanker, President of the United Federation of Teachers, has been sentenced to fifteen days in jail. He requests Dr. King to contribute $5.00 towards the payment of Mr. Shanker's fine and for permission to state publicly that he has contributed.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins, the chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urges Dr. King to attend a special meeting in Washington, D.C. to plan a course of action on pending civil rights legislation.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, CANADA

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Letter from James Degener to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Indiana (IN), Chicago, IL

Lutheran Church youth advisor James Degener asks that Dr. King assist him in showing a group of teenagers life around the dilapidated side of Chicago. Degener's goal is to expose the young people to the crippling and tragic conditions of the inner city. At the time of this correspondence, Dr. King and SCLC were in the midst of an open housing campaign in Chicago, known as the Chicago Freedom Movement.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1963

Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), California (CA), Ohio (OH), Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Texas (TX), JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Michigan (MI), Pennsylvania (PA)

This issue of the SCLC Newsletter covers the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The publication features a number of photographs, editorials and the full text of Dr. King's Washington address.

Letter from Finley Drewery to NAACP

Saturday, June 17, 1967
Georgia (GA)

Finley Drewery writes to the NAACP seeking aid for his upcoming criminal trial. He asserts that the state has no hard evidence against him and that his court appointed attorney is trying to make him pay $3,000 to mount a defense in court.

Telegram from Mrs. Terry Brown to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Terry Brown writes Dr. King reflecting on her participation in the Great Freedom March. She also expresses to Dr. King how his words are a source of inspiration.

Letter from Ethel Sebastian to MLK

Wednesday, September 12, 1962
Albany, GA, New York (NY)

Mrs. Ethel Sebastian requests that Dr. King assists in the search of her father, whom she has never met. Mrs. Sebastian provides facts and details to better aid Dr. King's pursuit of locating her father. She also mentions her cousin, a Reverend, who is a member of Friendship Baptist Church. Mrs. Sebastian is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and sends her blessings in hope that he can locate her family relatives.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's understanding of viewing Christ in relation to God's character.

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Wednesday, March 17, 1965
CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

Wycliffites: Followers of John Wycliffe

Dr. King writes on the ideas of English philosopher John Wycliffe's followers, "Wycliffites."

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

National-Zeitung Questionnaire


The National-Zeitung of Switzerland asks questions surrounding the current international issues of peace and the Vietnam War.

Letter from James O'Malley to MLK


Father James O'Malley of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Chicago asks Dr. King to withdraw from the Chicago Lawn area. He is concerned about the potential response to integration of the Lithuanians and Poles who live in the neighborhood.


Dr. King quotes Ernest Fremont Tittle's "The Lord's Prayer," in which Tittle explains how Jesus measured greatness.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Diaz

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Gunnar Jahn

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Gynnar Jahn organizes a delegation of Nobel Peace Prize winners who will have a discussion about the Vietnam War.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

Letter from CORE to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968
Missouri (MO), Wisconsin (WI), GEORGIA

The Kansas City, Missouri Chapter of CORE writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend their Negro History Week program.

Letter from Arthur R. Mann to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Arthur Mann thanks Dora McDonald for her hospitality during a recent visit to Atlanta by New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Letter From Don Slaiman

Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Don Slaiman of the AFL-CIO encloses a brochure titled "The Right to Strike and General Welfare." This brochure, which was developed by the Committee on the Church and Economic Life of the National Council of Churches, address problems and proposes solution to the Labor Movement.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The writer informs Dr. King that he or she is repulsed with Dr. King and laments the day that "your people get to rule this country."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding British Edition of Book

Thursday, May 11, 1967
New York (NY), London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

In this letter, Joan Daves relays details regarding the British edition of "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?" to Dr. King.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."