Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Chicago, IL"

Letter from Mrs. Bill Green to MLK

Monday, May 27, 1963

Mrs. Bill Green, an uneducated white woman, informs Dr. King on the spiriutal words she has recieved from God. Mrs. Green asserts that she recieved this insight after she envisioned the struggle Dr. king has endured. She lists four ideas surrounding the lack of collectivity amongst the races and the acknowledgment of the power of prayer.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from MLK to Helen Anderson

Friday, February 9, 1968

This letter is in acknowledgement and appreciation of contributions to the SCLC from Mrs. Helen Anderson to Dr. King which was overlooked in the mail.

God Nature

Dr. King sketches his thoughts on Saint Thomas Aquinas' "investigation of God's nature."

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman Robert T. Stafford writes to Dr. King acknowledging receipt of a recent request to support a particular bill. Stafford asserts that he will respect the majority rule of the District of Columbia and possibly revisit the petition at a later date.

Schleiermacher (Dogmas & Creeds)

Dr. King references Friedrich Schleiermacher's notions of dogmas and creeds, stating that they are mere descriptions of feeling.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

Letter from Victor Carter to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Victor Carter writes a letter of support to Dr. King on behalf of he and his wife. The Carters are unable to attend the Selma to Montgomery march but enclose a check to aid in the civil right struggle.

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

Friday, September 6, 1963

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."

Letter from Pamela Schnida to MLK

Thursday, October 10, 1067

Pamela Schnida writes to Dr. King requesting information on the riots that occurred in 1967.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

States Avoid Woes: Hughes and Stanley Attacks Deadbeats in UN

Sunday, January 5, 1964

These are two articles from the Des Moines Sunday Register. The first article entitled "States Avoid Woes: Hughes" by Donald Kaul focuses on a statement by then Iowa Governor Harold Hughes. Hughes asserts that it is the right and responsibility of the states to solve domestic social problems. The other article explores the opinion of then state representative David Stanley. Stanley believes that all United Nations members should share in the operating costs of the UN.

Letter from Monica Wilson to Dora McDonald

Friday, March 11, 1966

Monica Wilson, from the School of African studies at the University of Cape Town, writes Dora McDonald expressing joy and excitement that Dr. King accepted the invitation to deliver the Davie Memorial Lecture. Wilson states that while King's accommodations are taken care of, the school cannot possibly pay for his aide.

Letter from Michael Williams to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

The Chairman of the Society of African and Afro-American Students, at the University of Pennsylvania, extends an invitation to Dr. King to come speak with students during "Black Week."

Letter from the Prime Minister of Jordan to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

The Prime Minister of Jordan, Wasfi Tell, invites Dr. King to visit Jordan during his upcoming pilgrimage to the Middle East. Minister Tell assures Dr. King that his pilgrimage will be regarded spiritually, and not politically.

Telegram from Bob Dillon to MLK

Sunday, September 15, 1963

In this telegram, Bob Dillon requests Dr. King's presence along with Reverend Billy Graham at a revival being held in what he classifies as an "unchristian community" in Birmingham.

Anonymous letter to MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joseph McKinney to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Reverend Lee Wright invites Dr. King to speak at the Annual Spring Membership Campaign for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Wheeling Branch in West Virginia.

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

MLK Announces New Appointment

Dr. King announces the immediate appointment of Jesse Jackson as the Director of Special Projects and Economic Development for SCLC. The new department will focus on "stimulating the development and expansion of Negro businesses and services."

Telegram from Johnnie McKinney to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Johnnie McKinney telegrams Dr. King to invite him to a fundraising event that is set to occur in Wyoming. McKinney states, "Wyoming needs you to make Reverend Reebs home state a real fortress of equality."

Thank You Letter from MLK to Reverend Terrell

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr.King expresses his deep appreciation to Union Baptist Church for their generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Summit Conference Program

Sunday, December 15, 1963

This program outlines the schedule and issues of concern to be addressed at the Summit Conference.

Letter from Otto Emil Geppert to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Otto Emil Geppert expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and encloses a monetary contribution to Dr. King, in support of his nonviolent approach.

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

Program for Ecumenical Service in Storkyrkan

The following document is a program for an ecumenical service held at Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. King provided the sermon for the service that was translated in the Swedish native language.

Letter from Blanche Shropshire to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967

Mrs. Shropshire expresses her gratitutde to Dr. King for his inspiring words at an address delivered in Buffalo, New York.