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Letter from A. William Loos to James Farmer

Monday, July 19, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM

A. William Loos expresses his agreement with the actions of the recipient, James Farmer, which lead to the reconsideration of a vote to remove United States troops from Vietnam.

Sin

Dr. King explains the relationship between punishment and sin by referencing the biblical verse, I Chronicles 21:17.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Wisconsin (WI), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Letter from MLK to Melvin Grussing Regarding a Contribution

Monday, February 26, 1968
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King writes to express gratitude for the generous contribution of $126 to the SCLC. He conveys that such support enables SCLC to continue programs to complete the task of voter registration in the South.

Letter from Culbert G. Rutenber to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Professor Rutenber, of Andover Newton Theological School, writes Dr. King on behalf of Lovic Dean, an African American minister, who has requested Dr. King send him "the best books" to build a library on the subject of pacifism.

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA)

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

Letter from Oscar Seitz to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mr. Seitz expresses his appreciation for the efforts of Dr. King and the SCLC by enclosing a check to the organization.

Man

Dr. King records a quote from Jeremiah 17:9, which discusses the evilness of man.

Sincerity and Intelligence

Dr. King reviews the Christian teaching of sincerity and its relationship to intelligence. Referencing Judaistic history and a biblical story involving the Apostle Paul, he comments that sincerity alone is lacking. He insists that Christians must infuse their sincerity with intelligence in order to "solve the spiritual problems of the world."

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Letter of Holy Land Trip Postponement from MLK to Sandy F. Ray

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
New York (NY), GREECE, ISRAEL

In this retained copy of his letter to Sandy Ray of Concreta Tours, Dr. King postpones his planned tour of the Holy Land. Dr. King suggests observing the escalating conflict there, along with the strife in Greece, before revisiting further plans for trips to those areas.

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Floyd B. McKissick to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this telegram, Floyd B. McKissick tells Dr. King that he will not be able to attend a march and rally in Chicago due to his schedule.

The Hard or the Easy Way?

Thursday, October 5, 1961
Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Arkansas (AR), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Regional Council discusses the topics of school segregation and integration in specific southern states and counties, especially Yancey County, North Carolina.

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

Soul Force and Woman Power

This notecard titled Soul Force refers to a Woman Power March to be held on June 19, 1968

MLK's Statement on Birmingham Jails

Monday, May 6, 1963
Birmingham, AL

During a broadcast, Dr. King states that the witness and determination of those incarcerated in Birmingham, will break down the barriers of segregation.

Letter from Wilford Tallie to Dr. King

Friday, January 28, 1966
Chicago, IL

Wilford Tallie, a Veteran at the West Side Veteran's Hospital, expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the SCLC Chicago Campaign.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Monday, January 22, 1968
NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter Envelope from MLK, Addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber

New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

This envelope is addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Questions Which Easter Answers

Dr. King writes a sermon entitled, "Questions Which Easter Answers." King asserts that while many people attend church on Easter because of its value as it relates to Christ, the true significance in Easter is in the fact that is makes one think of immortality; as symbolized in Jesus Christ.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."

Letter from Mary L. Rhett to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
South Carolina (SC)

Mary Rhett writes Dr. King informing him that she has a very important matter to discuss with him regarding the civil rights struggle.

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Telegram from the New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

The New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action wishes Dr. King well in his recovery.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Seventh Biennial Religious Conference

New Jersey (NJ)

This is a program for the seventh Biennial Religious Conference at Princeton University. Initially conceived shortly after World War II, the conference continues to confront important issues of human life. Under the leadership of the Student Christian Association, "Integration: Conscience in Crisis" will take place over a span of four days. Topics of the conference include "the historical and social as well as the judicial, international, and theological" implications of segregation and integration.

Letter from Ned and Augusta Thomas to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM

Ned and Augusta Thomas write Dr. King asking if SCLC is truly a "nonsectarian agency," then why is the word "Christian" a part of the name? They also state that they "strongly back" Dr. King's stand on Vietnam.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Lilace Reid Barnes

Monday, May 23, 1966
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the contribution made by Lilace Barnnes to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King states that without the contributions from supporters the initiatives of the SCLC would not be possible.