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Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Albany, GA

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

Telegram from Selma Frazier to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Selma Frazier and family send their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.

Letter from Mrs. Julia D. Fields to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Florida (FL)

Julia Fields is the only Negro stockbroker in Florida and discusses the adversities she has experienced with Dr. King. Mrs. Fields describes this time period as the "worst year of her life" because the whites resent any Negro attempting to move in their neighborhood. Dr. King is addressed to possibly give advice to better her situation and uplift her "let down" spirit.

Support Letter to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966
INDIA, Alabama (AL)

The author of this letter is sending Dr. King a book entitiled 'Satyagraha in South Africa' by Mahatma Gandhi. The book holds similarities to Dr. King's book 'Stride Towards Freedom'. The author of the letter describes how both books have provided inspiration to those who believe in the philosophy of non-violence.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Monday, January 22, 1968
NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

MLK Handwritten Draft Letter

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the letter he received providing insights to an unknown problem.

Tonight Show Appearance Press Release

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The SCLC announces that Dr. King will appear on the Tonight Show with Harry Belafonte filling in for Johnny Carson as host. Comedian Nipsey Russell and actor Paul Newman, both active in the civil rights movement, will also be guests. Dr. King looks forward to this opportunity to speak about the upcoming Poor People?s Campaign.

Letter from Robert Green to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Memphis, TN, Jackson, MS

SCLC Education Director Robert Green writes Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach requesting a federal intervention on discrimination practices in Mississippi. Green complains that members of SCLC, SNCC, CORE and other organizations were denied access to restrooms during the 1966 James Meredith March Against Fear.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from George Overton to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1954
Connecticut (CT)

George Overton sends Dora McDonald a letter thanking her for the calendar of Dr. King's family. He also requests some photographs and expresses his support of Dr. King.

Telegram from Dr. Robert Green to MLK

Monday, September 12, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Robert L. Green, Executive Director of Friends of SNCC Los Angeles, criticizes recent remarks made by the SCLC regarding his organization. Dr. Green also advises Dr. King that the SCLC should not comment on SNCC, if the SCLC cannot say something positive.

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

Letter from Katherine H. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, March 27, 1965
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Katherine H. Jackson writes Dr. King on behalf of the late Reverend James J. Reeb. The Marin County Board of Supervisors declared March 20, James J. Reeb Memorial Day. Contributions were received throughout the county and forwarded to the SCLC. In addition, Jackson invites Dr. King to Marin County at a later, more convenient date.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

MLK Statement Regarding the Land Purchase Agreement with the Atlanta Housing Authority

Monday, July 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA

With a purchase of land through the Atlanta Housing Authority, Dr. King announces that Ebenezer Baptist Church intends to provide new housing in an organized neighborhood near downtown Atlanta. Ebenezer Baptist Church also plans to develop a program with contracting firms to teach men the fundamentals of construction.

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

Letter from MLK to Rev. H. Edward Whitaker

Tuesday, April 3, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Rev. Edward Whitaker, regarding Whitaker's desire to be a college minster. He expresses to Whitaker that his experience should serve him well for such a responsibility. Dr. King and Rev. Whitaker were classmates at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Randolph Blackwell to Greene, Ayers, Swigert & Cluster

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Florida (FL)

Randolph T. Blackwell responds to the gentlemen of Greene, Ayers, Swiger & Cluster concerning a previous issue.

Letter from Frances S. Smith to MLK

Friday, June 5, 1964
New York, NY

Frances Smith, Promotion Director for the Christian journal "Christianity and Crisis," asks Dr. King to write a few sentences regarding the "need for continuing analysis of the civil rights movement from the Christian perspective."

Index Card with Dr.King's Handwritten Philosophy Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines insights on pantheism and references philosophers Goethe, Spinoza, and Rousseau. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

SCLC Tour of Northern Cities

Chicago, IL

Dr. King announces an SCLC tour of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Washington, DC. He cites the wish to establish communication with people in the black ghettos of northern cities and to assist local leadership in taking movement issues into their communities. He mentions the moral and material support provided by northern allies for the southern struggle and a time to reciprocate.

Dr. King on Vietnam: Demagogic Tactics

VIETNAM

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall critiques Dr. King's Vietnam stance and asserts that Dr. King's position undermines his work and credibility as a civil rights leader.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1957
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Vice President Nixon writes to Dr. King concerning the efficiency and effectiveness of the Civil Rights Bill. He expresses his gratitude for a previous correspondence from Dr. King and ensures his continued advocacy of civil rights legislation.

Freedom

Dr. King summarizes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr and his conceptualization of "Freedom."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from Mrs. Jena Hobbs

Monday, April 8, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Coretta Scott King received many kind and heartfelt letters of condolence, following the assassination of her husband. This document, in particular, came from Mrs. Lena Hobbs of Brooklyn, NY, who wanted to express the empathy she felt for Mrs. King and her four children. According to Mrs. Hobbs, Dr. King was a great leader that would be dearly missed.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), New York, NY, London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Milnor Alexander

Friday, November 6, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the kick-off celebration for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom 50th Anniversary. A previous engagement in another section of the country prevents Dr. King from accepting. However, Dr. King would later speak for the organization in Philadelphia. Coretta Scott King was a key member and sponsor of the league.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Bartley to MLK

Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King was sent this telegram from a couple who had recently heard him speak, prior to his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.