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Letter from Debbie Steiner to MLK

Sunday, May 17, 1964

Debbie Steiner of Willburn, New Jersey tells Dr. King how she was moved by his article in Life magazine, which she calls "a realistic summary of why the Negro can not wait." She explains her discontent with prejudice and inquires about how young people can influence change.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Letter from Alan and June Fite to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

In this letter dated April 19, 1967, Alan and June Fite commend Dr. King for his speech given at a peace demonstration on April 15 and request a copy of the speech.

Project Concern Pamphlet

This Pamphlet, made by Project Concern, discusses the efforts taken to help the impoverished and sick.

Letter from United States Congress to MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Joseph McDade writes Dr. King to solicit his views regarding the affects of organized crime on the plight of the urban poor.

King Calls for Anti-War Referendum

Friday, August 4, 1967

Dr. King announces a nationwide campaign to give Americans an opportunity to vote on the Vietnam War. He explains that the local initiative is a unique and dramatic way for the people to deliver their mandate against the war.

Letter from Roosevelt Zanders to MLK

Sunday, June 3, 1962

Roosevelt Zanders expresses his appreciation to Dr. King after receiving a kind letter and personal autographed copy of "Stride Toward Freedom." Zanders expresses his appreciation for the luncheon in Washington, D. C. and states his desire to visit the Reverend again.

New Wine in New Bottles

Dr. King outlines a sermon he preached at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery on October 17, 1954. His text is Matthew 9:17. He compares new ideas to new wine, stating that an idea cannot progress if people are not ready to accept it; this is what it means for an idea to be before its time. New ideas require new structures to contain them. The same is true in our personal lives when we resolve to rid ourselves of bad habits.

Letter to Monsier Sempe from Joan Daves

Thursday, October 17, 1963

This is a letter stating that Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" cannot be used in any books because Dr. King wants it to appear in his own book first and it cannot be used before a French version of that book becomes available. Any translation and duplication of his letter violates copyright laws.

Letter to MLK from the Women For: Organization

Thursday, May 25, 1967

The WOMEN FOR: organization sent Dr. King a letter with their enclosed policy regarding the conflict in Vietnam. Women For: is a non-partisan civic organization that is actively involved in local, national, and international affairs. The group of over 2,000 women believed, unanimously, that the United States should cease all military occupation.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Samuel Proctor

Friday, December 29, 1967

In this telegram to Dr. Samuel Proctor and Family, Dr. King expresses his grief upon hearing of the death of Dr. Proctor's mother.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Receipt from the SCLC to Mr. John Henry Kelly IV

Monday, July 10, 1967

This document is a receipt to John Henry Kelly IV for his $1.00 contribution to the SCLC.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The sender of this letter lists six main goals that should be accomplished in 1968. The sender pleads for Dr. King to take leadership in accomplishing these goals.

Letter from Sharon J. Brown to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Sharon Brown, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King how his congregation worships. She explains that this question is for a class project.

Mass Mailing from the Model Inner city Community Organization

Thursday, February 23, 1967

This is a form letter from the Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy informing the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. about Dr. King's visit to help revitalize the area.

SCLC Newsletter: February 1964

Saturday, February 1, 1964

This SCLC newsletter covers items ranging from Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize nomination to voter registration drives throughout the country. The lead photo features national civil rights leaders "summoned to the White House for a special conference with President Lyndon B. Johnson."

Letter from Robert Carter and D. John Heyman to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968

The National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing (NCDH) sends Dr. King a report, which examined "where the jobs are and where those who need them most now live." According to the NCDH, the study shows that jobs are not in the same geographic area where Negroes and other minorities live.

Meet the Press Interview with Roy Wilkins and MLK

Sunday, August 25, 1963

This document is a transcript of NBC’s “Meet the Press” televised press conference with Dr. King and Roy Wilkins. The program is moderated by Ned Brooks. Frank Van Der Linden, Robert MacNeil, Richard Wilson, and Lawrence Spivak are panelists. Some of the topics covered are the goals of the March on Washington, a concern about whether the Civil Rights Movement is pushing too hard, and past political affiliations of Bayard Rustin.

Letter from Bernard Edelman to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Bernard Edelman, a former supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, expresses his objection to Dr. King's stance on Vietnam.

Letter from George E. Riddick to MLK

Wednesday, July 8, 1964

Mr. Riddick writes to Dr. King and thanks him for speaking at Soldier Field. He expresses the support of the Illinois community for Dr. King's ministry on behalf of Civil Rights.

Letter from the US Civil Service Commission to Helyn M. Brooks

Friday, March 26, 1965

The United States Civil Service Commission informs Mrs. Helyn M. Brooks of her prospects for consideration for appointment in a civil service position.Mrs. Brooks' prospects section estimate is listed as poor.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967

Kenneth Lee extends his gratitude for Dr. King's sponsorship status for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. Mr. Lee asks Dora McDonald if a meeting can be arranged between himself and Dr. King during his visit to Atlanta, Georgia in August 1967.

God (His Love)

Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne's "Studies in Christianity" on God's infinite love for humanity.

Letter from Richard Landau of Antioch College to MLK

Friday, January 29, 1965

Richard Landau, Editor of The Antiochian, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and "biographical data sheet" for a story about his upcoming appearance as the commencement speaker.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Friday, September 8, 1961

Vernon R. Byrd, a fellow Boston University graduate, invites Dr. King to Bermuda to be a speaker for Men's Day at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from David Cole Gordon to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

David Cole Gordon, Consulting Editor for American Humanist Association, requests that Dr. King provide an essay for their upcoming feature, "This is How I Live."