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Letter from MLK on behalf of Cosby Wallace

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King requests reconsideration of Mr. Cosby Wallace's status in the U. S. Army. The financial strain on Mr. Wallace’s family and a physical disability warrants his not being inducted.

Letter from Alice Cooper to MLK

Sunday, February 18, 1968
Florida (FL), IRAN, THAILAND, Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Cooper expresses agreement with Dr. King's article in the May 1967 edition of "The Progressive," which discussed the inherit injustice in using "black and white" as names for races. She also sends a copy of an article she wrote that suggests some alternate names.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Birmingham, AL

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Telegram from MLK to Judy Silver & Gordon Geller

Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King salutes the Cincinnati Committee of Concern for Soviet Jewry for their efforts to end discrimination against the Jewish people of the U.S.S.R.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. J Parry Jones for an SCLC Contribution

Friday, December 8, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

This letter from Dr. King responded to a donation to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference from Mr. and Mrs. J. Parry Jones of Newton, Pennsylvania. Dr. King expressed deep appreciation on behalf of the multitudes who would benefit from the support.

Letter from Stephen Johnston to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Stephen Johnston, of the Communications Department at the National Cathedral in Washington D.C, forwards Dr. King a copy of the press release promoting his upcoming appearance. It was on this date that Dr. King delivered his second to last speech, "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Letter from Norman Thomas to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Norman Thomas offers his congratulations to Dr. King for being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Thomas also feels the need to thank the Nobel Committee for recognizing Dr. King's leadership in being the one to receive the coveted award.

Letter from MLK to J. Frank Patch

Friday, May 13, 1966
CANADA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King declines to accept J. Frank Patch's invitation to attend the conference sponsored by the Baptist Union of Western Canada due to prior commitments in the United States.

Martin Luther King To Speak in Ithaca

Tuesday, March 28, 1961
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This article from the Ithaca Journal talks about Dr. King's speaking engagement at Cornell University's Bailey Hall in Ithaca. The article also gives some background information on Dr. King.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter to J. Avery from MLK

Friday, May 13, 1966
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses embarrassment because of his late response to a telegram requesting his presence and explains that the mistake is due to an overworked, understaffed office. The tone of the letter conveys the personal concern King feels for each of the numerous individuals who seek his participation in events around the country.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Jespersen Og Pios Forlag has made an offer for the Danish language rights to "Strength To Love." Enclosed are agreements signed by Jespersen Og Pios Forlag.

Cover of the Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter

Monday, March 1, 1965
Iowa (IA)

The cover of Iowa's Catholic Interracial Council announces that Dr. King will be the recipient of the 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. The awards banquet is held in Davenport, Iowa.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

Atlanta, GA, CHINA, VIETNAM

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Letter from G. Campbell-Westlind to MLK

Wednesday, July 21, 1965
SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA, Stockholm, Sweden, New York (NY)

G. Campbell-Westlind, Acting Consul General of the Royal Consulate General of Sweden, informs Dr. King that Simon & Schuster has asked the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm for permission to print his Nobel Award Acceptance Speech. The letter requests Dr. King's comments on the proposal.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Blicksilver

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Blicksilver for his contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges the impact of such support in improving race relations throughout the nation.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CHINA, FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Geneva, Switzerland, BURMA / MYANMAR, ITALY, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., CANADA, SOUTH KOREA

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

Office of Economic Opportunity Application for Community Action Program

This document displays the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee Wilcox County S.C.L.C., Inc. budget. The budget focuses on their Family Development and Family Education Project.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

MLK Itinerary

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, London, England, Berlin, Germany, GERMANY, Colorado (CO), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), New Jersey (NJ), Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Indiana (IN), Missouri (MO), New York, NY

Dr. King's secretary is writing Joan Daves to notify her of his speaking engagements for the 1964-1965 season.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

Letter from MLK Regarding Atlanta University Center

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes to a woman concerning what he calls "the best Negro colleges in the South." He discusses the Atlanta University Center, which consists of Spelman College, Morehouse College, Clark University and Morris Brown College.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. Frank Patch

Monday, January 25, 1965
CANADA

Dr. King writes Reverend J. Frank Patch informing him that his schedule prevents him from accepting Patch's invitation to speak at the Baptist Union of Western Canada.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 7, 1967
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., London, England

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, writes Dr. King to invite him to a meeting with members of the British Parliament to discuss the developing racial crisis in their country. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Baruch Treiger

Thursday, October 21, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks the National Women's League for its continued financial support of the SCLC.

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from George Field to Ms. McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Fields requests advance text of remarks Dr. King is to give at the Twenty-second Freedom House Anniversary Dinner. The Freedom House Dinner receives major attention from the media and boasts a guest list of influential opinion makers.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.