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Letter From Dora McDonald to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, May 28, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, London, England

Ms. McDonald thanks Mrs. Harvey for her contribution to the SCLC, and informs her that Dr. King will contact her on his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King thanks David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union for their thoughtful donation to SCLC. The contribution will be used to assist the SCLC in voter registration, direct action and other methods to combat racial injustice.

Estimated Budget for 1957 - 1958

This drafted budget written by Dr. King lists a number of expenses and allotments for traveling, speaking engagements, supplies and utilities for the office.

Letter from Marc Pilisuk to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), CANADA

Marc Pilisuk, Associate Professor of Administrative Science and Psychology at Purdue University, requests Dr. King's permission to reprint the book "The Triple Revolution."

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

Sunday, September 14, 1958
Brooklyn, NY, Montgomery, AL

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

SCLC Report on the Status of the Affiliate Department

Monday, June 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL

T. Y. Rogers gives a detailed report as the Acting Director of the SCLC Affiliates Department. He includes certain organization procedures that will enhance the vitality of the staff and the number of affiliates in various regions of the country.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Grand Hotel

Oslo, Norway

Dora McDonald sends an additional Grand Hotel reservation request for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies of December 1964.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Invitation for MLK to Speak at Bryn Mawr College

Tuesday, January 4, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

The class of 1966 from Bryn Mawr College invite Dr. King to be the baccalaureate speaker for their service on Sunday May 29th. They remind Dr. King that he was scheduled to speak previously but other engagements prevented him from doing so.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Flight Schedule for Coretta Scott King and Party

Tuesday, December 1, 1964
Atlanta, GA, London, England, New York, NY, FRANCE, Oslo, Norway, Stockholm, Sweden, DENMARK, Georgia (GA), UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY)

The Henderson Travel Service provides a detailed schedule of suggested flights for Coretta Scott King and others traveling to witness Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Maschera Pier-Carlo to MLK

Friday, October 6, 1967
ITALY

Maschera Pier-Carlo, a citizen of Italy, writes Dr. King informing him that his book "Strength to Love" helped her understand the true value of Christian love and God.

Birthday Card from Margarite Foley

This birthday, wishing the recipient "increasing joy," was sent by Margarite Foley.

Letter from MLK to Thomas Harten

Monday, July 15, 1963
New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes to Rev. Harten of the Holy Trinity Baptist Church to thank him and his organization for the donation of one thousand dollars. He explains how the money will be used throughout the SCLC and the importance of having support from organizations who help contribute to the Civil Rights Movement.

Program for Ecumenical Service in Storkyrkan

Stockholm, Sweden, Oslo, Norway

The following document is a program for an ecumenical service held at Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. King provided the sermon for the service that was translated in the Swedish native language.

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
New York (NY)

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

Letter from James McLaurin to MLK and Andrew Young

Tuesday, March 15, 1966
Chicago, IL

James McLaurin asks Dr. King to spend part of a day with the students and faculty at Garrett. The topic that they want Dr. King to speak about is the seminary's role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Hugh Bingham to MLK

Friday, April 22, 1966
New York (NY), AUSTRALIA, Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Hugh Bingham, Associate Editor of the London Daily Mirror, requests help planning his trip to the United States to report on the "progress and processes of integration." He explains that, in addition to the political aspects of integration, he would also like to write about the people involved in the movement.

The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, CONGO / ZAIRE, BELGIUM, SOUTH AFRICA, Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY

Dr. King makes a public statement addressing the poor economic and housing conditions in the North. Dr. King specifically identifies Chicago as the prototype for the conditions occurring within this region. He describes a three phase plan detailing how to properly address and manage the problems effectively.

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Friday, September 7, 1962
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

Letter from Robert Weaver to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Secretary Weaver responds to a former letter from Dr. King requesting assistance for an economic project sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church. He informs Dr. King to contact Mr. John Thigpen at the Atlanta Federal Housing Administration office.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

New York (NY)

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.

Letter from J. Herbert May to Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Minnesota (MN), Wisconsin (WI)

Herbert May discusses several points in which he disagrees with Ralph Abernathy on how to best reach a fully integrated and equitable society.

Letter from Kivie Kaplan to MLK Regarding His NewBook

Wednesday, February 22, 1967
Florida (FL)

In this letter, Kaplan requests an autographed copy of Dr. King's new book enclosed with a personal message. Mr. Kaplan also requests that Dr. King autograph the books ordered from Harper & Row, since he gets a discount buying in bulk.

Ezekiel and the Philosophy of History

ISRAEL

Dr. King records his interpretation of Ezekiel and the Oracles against Foreign Nations. He asserts that the Biblical series affirms monotheism and a "providential philosophy of history."