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Letter From A.H. Emmott to MLK

Thursday, February 6, 1964

A. H. Emmott congratulates Dr. King on winning Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" award and invites him to speak at the Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities in Canada. The UMBC is an organization, which represents the interests of local governments within the Province of British Columbia.

Workers Defense League Board Meeting Announcement

This is an invitation to the annual national executive board meeting of the Workers Defense League in New York City. The agenda is to discuss civil rights, how to defend the rights of conscientious objectors, workers and welfare recipients, political asylum, and other topics.

Letter from Hadley Executive Committee to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Director of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests Dr. King's participation in the Hadley Memorial Fund lecture.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares an Easter sermon entitled "Why Death Could Not Hold Him." He references scripture passage Acts 2: 24. The date and place of delivery for this sermon is unknown.

Schleiermacher's Meaning of Religion

Dr. King cites a quotation from Friedrich Schleiermacher's perception of the meaning of religion. Schleiermacher asserts that the soul is dissolved in the immediate feeling of the infinite and eternal. Dr. King notes that in order for one to understand the externals of religion, we must first have the inner experience.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

God

Dr. King records a note on French scholar Ernest Renan's prophecy in relation to God.

Letter from Ethel Sebastian to MLK

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Mrs. Ethel Sebastian requests that Dr. King assists in the search of her father, whom she has never met. Mrs. Sebastian provides facts and details to better aid Dr. King's pursuit of locating her father. She also mentions her cousin, a Reverend, who is a member of Friendship Baptist Church. Mrs. Sebastian is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and sends her blessings in hope that he can locate her family relatives.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Telegram from W. L. Battle to MLK

Apostle W. L. Battle offers to sponsor Dr. King in a "preaching extravaganza and conference."

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend an urgent meeting of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights to discuss civil rights developments in the Senate. The 1964 Civil Rights Act was under debate at the time in the United States House of Representatives and Senate.

Ezekiel and the Philosophy of History

Dr. King records his interpretation of Ezekiel and the Oracles against Foreign Nations. He asserts that the Biblical series affirms monotheism and a "providential philosophy of history."

Letter from William W. Stafford to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

William Stafford expresses admiration, gratitude and support for Dr. King's work with the Civil Rights Movement and his stand against the Vietnam War.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Robert Browning's "Paracelsus."

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

Letter from Ned French to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

A high school student requests the political opinions of several famous individuals concerning the national issues and potential candidates of the 1968 presidential election.

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

Letter from T. Jansma to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

The General Secretary of the Baptists in the Netherlands praises Dr. King for receiving an honorary degree from Vrije Unversiteit in Amsterdam and inquires if he is available to deliver any speeches in the Netherlands during the same time period.

Telegram from Uppsala Student to MLK

Monday, November 9, 1964

Student organizations in Sweden invite Dr. King to Uppsala during his visit to Scandinavia.

Metaphysic[s]

Dr. King quotes William James’ “The Sentiment of Rationality” on Arthur Schopenhauer’s view of metaphysics.

Letter from Mr. Paul W. Moon to Miss Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 17, 1963

Paul Hoon of the Union Theological Seminary, asks Ms. McDonald if the invitation formerly extended to Dr. King has had any change in status.

Letter from Joseph Sittler to MLK

Friday, February 14, 1964

Joseph Sittler requests feedback from Dr. King regarding the McCarran Act. The McCarran Act dealt with subversive activities and was passed in 1950. Sittler encloses a reply card for Dr. King's convenience.

Letter from Leila Robins to MLK

Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Harper and Row is having difficulty publishing a paperback edition of "Where Do We Go From Here? "

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

Letter from the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Ulf Sviden, Chairman of the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch, sends Dr. King a congratulatory letter for his Nobel Peace Prize Award and an invitation to speak to the students of Stockholm.

Staff of SCLC

The SCLC lists its executive, field and clerical staff.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Samuel S. Backlar to MLK

Friday, October 3, 1958

Samuel S. Backlar, Chairman of the American Legion New York County Organization, writes Dr. King wishing him a "speedy recovery" and invites him to speak at Abraham Lincoln's 150th birthday celebration.