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Hus, John

Dr. King makes biographical notes about John Hus, the leader of the Czech reform.

61:19 General Correspondence 1961 (R)

Tuesday, October 24, 1961
Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA)

Maude Reid request a manuscript copy of Dr. King's speech at New Calvary Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan.

A Country Called Corporate America

Sunday, July 3, 1966
New York (NY), California (CA), Illinois (IL), Pennsylvania (PA), Texas (TX), Ohio (OH)

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

Iowa (IA), Illinois (IL)

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

God

Dr. King writes about God's love according to Ezra 3:11.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

Letter from Bill Kunstler to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963
New York, NY, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD

Famed civil rights attorney William Kunstler states that this was the first time a federal court enjoined prosecution of contempt cases under a state injunction. He would like to use the same procedures in Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Flinsch

Friday, January 5, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter to Mrs. Margaret Flinsch, Dr. King personally thanks Flinsch for her generous contribution to SCLC and explains how her support benefits SCLC's efforts.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Goodwin

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's request for Mr. Daniel Goodwin to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms.

Critique of the Social Gospel

Dr. King used this outline while studying at Crozer Theological Seminary. The topics listed include: Social Contribution to Christianity, Contribution to Christian Social Philosophy, and the Sore Points of the Social Gospel.

Royalty Statement from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Harper and Row

Monday, April 10, 1967
New York (NY)

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the deductions for his royalty check from Harper and Row.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Original Sin

Dr. King records his views regarding the doctrine of original sin.

Statement of Mrs. Ruthie Lee Watts Regarding Death Plot on Dr. King

Selma, AL

Mrs. Watts submits a statement regarding a plot to assassinate Dr. King. She informs the FBI that a man named Jim Clark planned to kill Dr. King.

Race Problems in Albany

Wednesday, December 13, 1961
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

In the midst of some very disturbing events taking place in Albany, GA, Edward P. Morgan of the American Broadcasting Company writes this captivating broadcast message reflecting his personal view of the Negro's increasing self-awareness and recognition of its place in society.

Letter from Harry C. Meserve to Dr. King

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Michigan (MI)

Mr. Meserve of the Michigan Human Relation Council thanks Dr. King for his address to the organization. Additionally he apologizes for the disturbance of the "Nazis" during his visit.

Letter from Anna Mull Jones to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Indiana (IN)

Anna M. Jones informs Dr. King that she will pray for him while he is in jail, but she also requests that he read the history of the United States and reread the Constitution. She asserts that the Republican Party was created for the express purpose of halting the spread of slavery.

Letter from Robert Markowitz to MLK

Tuesday, January 1, 1963
Florida (FL)

Robert Markowitz, general manager of the Hampton House, sends Dr. King a request for reservations during the week of a golf tournament. He also lists the occupancy rates for the rooms.

Knowledge

Dr. King refers to Ecclesiastes 1:18 which says that increased knowledge brings increased sorrow.

Patripassianism

Dr. King gives a definition of patripassianism.

Letter from MLK to Alan Bible

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Alan Bible, a United States Senator from Nevada, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King's secretary sends Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway. The trip is associated with Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), HUNGARY

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from James C. Goodwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 8, 1967
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Mr. Goodwin, Executive Director of the Bay Area Neighborhood Development Non-profit Foundation, informs Dr. King of an artist who would like to present him the painting "Give Me a Future."

Letter to MLK Regarding Opposing Views

Friday, August 18, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The author of this letter expresses opposition towards Dr. King's civil disobedience methodologies, believing that civil disobedience is "contrary to God."

Letter from Fr. John McNamara to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
Louisiana (LA), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, St. Augustine, FL

Fr. McNamara, Catholic Chaplain at the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, writes Dr. King to extend congratulations on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Evil (Natural)

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson on the topic of evil.

Telegram from Memphis Sanitation Workers' to MLK

Sunday, October 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

Members of the Memphis Sanitation Workers' Strike express an urgent need for Dr. King to travel to Memphis in order to aid them in their crusade.

Washington D. C. Star: Negro Lawyer Pushing Town Incorporation Plan

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Congressman John Conyers shares an article with civil rights attorney, Orzell Billingsley. The article highlights Attorney Billingsley's efforts to join 20 predominately black municipalities, so that more African Americans can have a voice within politics and economic development.